any builders out there?! need some advice on converting garage.

18
Found 3rd Jun 2015
Hi,
I'm buying a house with a garage attached to the property, I want to convert it to a cinema room/man cave. it's only a single garage with single skin walls.

was wondering what would you recomend be my best plan of action? keep the door and brick in from inside or remove it?
Also in terms of insulating, should I breeze block with insulation between then batton, more insulation then plasterboard and plaster over that?

do I need to go the breeze block root or can I leave that out if the insulation under plasterboard is good enough?

Thanks in advance!

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Im not a builder but you can get several types/quality of foam backed plasterboard and skim to finish as used on solid walled homes which would save any brickie work.Ive used 50mm thermal insulated boarding on my walls to good effect.
buildingmaterials.co.uk/ins…tml


Edited by: "arachnoid" 3rd Jun 2015
Original Poster
arachnoid

Im not a builder but you can get several types/quality of foam backed … Im not a builder but you can get several types/quality of foam backed plasterboard and skim to finish as used on solid walled homes which would save any brickie work.Ive used 50mm thermal insulated boarding on my walls to good effect.http://www.buildingmaterials.co.uk/insulated-plasterboard.html



Thanks mate appreciate that, is it good at retaining heat? thinking I might need the room to be a little sound proofed too.. guessing the better quality boards will give better results..
Yes I have an old solid brick walled house and went for mid range of the offerings and the rooms are a lot warmer.You can get a different product which is a dense plaster board for sound proofing the stuff i got for the partition wall weighted a ton per sheet.

The cheaper insulated boarding is just the white flaky foam you see when you purchase electronic equipment and is a waste of money so go for the best you can afford for the outer walls you will notice the difference.
Original Poster
arachnoid

Yes I have an old solid brick walled house and went for mid range of the … Yes I have an old solid brick walled house and went for mid range of the offerings and the rooms are a lot warmer.You can get a different product which is a dense plaster board for sound proofing the stuff i got for the partition wall weighted a ton per sheet.The cheaper insulated boarding is just the white flaky foam you see when you purchase electronic equipment and is a waste of money so go for the best you can afford for the outer walls you will notice the difference.[/quote[quote=arachnoid]Yes I have an old solid brick walled house and went for mid range of the offerings and the rooms are a lot warmer.You can get a different product which is a dense plaster board for sound proofing the stuff i got for the partition wall weighted a ton per sheet.The cheaper insulated boarding is just the white flaky foam you see when you purchase electronic equipment and is a waste of money so go for the best you can afford for the outer walls you will notice the difference.



nice one Thanks for the advice mate, think I might go with something like that and save on a brickie!
Original Poster
mate ur a star, really appreciate the links and info, definitely will be ordering some of these once I'm in there!
Thanks again
Are you just thinking of planning to brick the inside of the garage door or will u build another wall around the inside so you have a double wall. The problem with a single skin wall is damp will penetrate once its plastered. At the moment its not covered from the inside so any moisture build up evaporates and u have good ventilation in the garage. Also alot of garages dont have a damp proof membrane on the floor either. Once you cover the floor u will again trap moisture.
My suggestion would be
1. Paint a dpm liquid membrane onto the floor. This can take a good few days to dry.
2. Build a stud wall from 100mm timber around the whole garage including behind the garage door. This will go up quick and save u alot of money then bricking up. Leave a gap of around a 25mm between the brick and timber to stop damp and allow air circulation.
3. fill all the spaces between the studs with 100mm kingspan ( or another brand ) insulation.
4. Do any electrics then plasterboard and skim.
Hope that helps. You can also choose thermal blocks if in favour of bricklaying but u would need to leave a 100mm cavity filled with 50mm kingspan or 100mm cavity wool insulation.
We had a double garage converted by builders to two storey they blocked up from inside of original walls then plasterboard over as normal. We then had bi fold doors put in where garage door used to be.
Original Poster
kash2013

Are you just thinking of planning to brick the inside of the garage door … Are you just thinking of planning to brick the inside of the garage door or will u build another wall around the inside so you have a double wall. The problem with a single skin wall is damp will penetrate once its plastered. At the moment its not covered from the inside so any moisture build up evaporates and u have good ventilation in the garage. Also alot of garages dont have a damp proof membrane on the floor either. Once you cover the floor u will again trap moisture. My suggestion would be1. Paint a dpm liquid membrane onto the floor. This can take a good few days to dry.2. Build a stud wall from 100mm timber around the whole garage including behind the garage door. This will go up quick and save u alot of money then bricking up. Leave a gap of around a 25mm between the brick and timber to stop damp and allow air circulation. 3. fill all the spaces between the studs with 100mm kingspan ( or another brand ) insulation. 4. Do any electrics then plasterboard and skim. Hope that helps. You can also choose thermal blocks if in favour of bricklaying but u would need to leave a 100mm cavity filled with 50mm kingspan or 100mm cavity wool insulation.



Thanks mate, so if I do this would I not need to brick the garage door in?
great advice, ill be putting in a small window too to help with ventilation plus the door to the house will help too..
I would do a skylight instead of window, this way you don't need to break walls, need to be careful with waterproofing though.
Banned
kash2013

Are you just thinking of planning to brick the inside of the garage door … Are you just thinking of planning to brick the inside of the garage door or will u build another wall around the inside so you have a double wall. The problem with a single skin wall is damp will penetrate once its plastered. At the moment its not covered from the inside so any moisture build up evaporates and u have good ventilation in the garage. Also alot of garages dont have a damp proof membrane on the floor either. Once you cover the floor u will again trap moisture. My suggestion would be1. Paint a dpm liquid membrane onto the floor. This can take a good few days to dry.2. Build a stud wall from 100mm timber around the whole garage including behind the garage door. This will go up quick and save u alot of money then bricking up. Leave a gap of around a 25mm between the brick and timber to stop damp and allow air circulation. 3. fill all the spaces between the studs with 100mm kingspan ( or another brand ) insulation. 4. Do any electrics then plasterboard and skim. Hope that helps. You can also choose thermal blocks if in favour of bricklaying but u would need to leave a 100mm cavity filled with 50mm kingspan or 100mm cavity wool insulation.



pretty much this. It could be worth tanking the walls. waterproof cement render then blackjack painting on. Then insulated plasterboard. Make sure boards are jacked up off floor by 1 cm.

In my 13 years as a plasterer builder we find this works best.
Original Poster
lukeybuilder

pretty much this. It could be worth tanking the walls. waterproof cement … pretty much this. It could be worth tanking the walls. waterproof cement render then blackjack painting on. Then insulated plasterboard. Make sure boards are jacked up off floor by 1 cm. In my 13 years as a plasterer builder we find this works best.



Cheers, sorry but what do u mean by tanking the walls? do u reckon I should leave the garage door on but stud wall over from the inside too?
thanks mate
Banned
allenjones2003

Cheers, sorry but what do u mean by tanking the walls? do u reckon I … Cheers, sorry but what do u mean by tanking the walls? do u reckon I should leave the garage door on but stud wall over from the inside too?thanks mate



tanking treats rising and penetrating damp. modern houses avoid penetrating damp is usually done by a wall cavity. which you don't have.
You will probably be ok the planning permission front but the following apply.

Building Regulations

The conversion of a garage, or part of a garage, into habitable space will normally require approval under the Building Regulations.

In-fill garage door
Flooring
Walls below ground level
Ventilation
The following common work sections give an indication of several other elements normally required to satisfy the requirements of the Regulations when converting a garage:

Doors and windows
Drainage
Electrics
External walls
Internal walls
Roofs
In-fill garage door

As part of the garage coversion, it is likely that the original garage door will be infilled with a new wall and possibly a window or door. As the foundation to the existing garage is not likely to be traditional (it's probably a shallow slab), a new foundation may be needed for the new wall. The existing foundation may be checked by digging alongside it until it's bottom is reached.

Foundations are required to transmit the load of the building safely to the ground. Therefore, all buildings should have adequate foundations (normally concrete), which will vary from one project to another depending on the circumstances of each case.

These foundations can be cast as deep-fill (filling most of the trench) or shallow-fill (where the minimum thickness to transfer the load to the soil is provided).

There are other types of foundations that may be used if the ground conditions do not make trench fill practicable. It is advisable to contact a structural engineer or speak to building control for further advice.
Edited by: "Argoj" 4th Jun 2015
allenjones2003

Thanks mate, so if I do this would I not need to brick the garage door … Thanks mate, so if I do this would I not need to brick the garage door in? great advice, ill be putting in a small window too to help with ventilation plus the door to the house will help too..


Bricking the garage door is a choice up to yourself. It will create more work or can be done at a later stage. If u do decide to brick up then you will need to do the following.
1. Dig down across the garage door width either 1m down to put in a concrete foundation or the easy way would be dig around 20 cm bellow ground and remove a brick on each end of the wall and fit a concrete lintel in between the gap and then build your brickwork up from here.
2. Build it up to the dpc level and again remove a bick from either end of the wall once you are up to dpc level. put a dpc membrane along the wall and lap the original dpc over the the old dpc. then build up to the window height. F
3. Fit window.
Original Poster
kash2013

Bricking the garage door is a choice up to yourself. It will create more … Bricking the garage door is a choice up to yourself. It will create more work or can be done at a later stage. If u do decide to brick up then you will need to do the following.1. Dig down across the garage door width either 1m down to put in a concrete foundation or the easy way would be dig around 20 cm bellow ground and remove a brick on each end of the wall and fit a concrete lintel in between the gap and then build your brickwork up from here. 2. Build it up to the dpc level and again remove a bick from either end of the wall once you are up to dpc level. put a dpc membrane along the wall and lap the original dpc over the the old dpc. then build up to the window height. F3. Fit window.




Thanks mate, really appreciate the help. Think to begin with I might not brick it in just seal off from inside with stud wall, after making sure its water tight.. Wouldn't be able to brick it myself would have to get a professional in prob costing around £1200 - £1500.

Will definitely get someone to knock a door through into the house though, don't fancy doing that myself!
Banned
You should be looking to pay 75 per square meter labour only for brickwork.
Just think a bit ahead if your walling in the garage door as you wont be able to open the door up once the partitions in so you might need to mount it on brackets to the brickwork externally till you decide to remove it.
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