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Any know how to tell if a graph has Exponential Decay?

10
Found 16th Apr 2011
As title really, how do you know if a graph/chart has exponential decay?

How do you work this out?
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Plot it on log graph paper and it should be a straight line

The way i read it is that the drop in results against the increase of X makes it exponential decay?

Or am i missing the point.


hughwp

Plot it on log graph paper and it should be a straight line



What happens if the results decay slightly when on log paper? (which they do)


choc1969

http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/teachingwdata/Graphsexponential.html



Thanks, have checked out that site and no wiser lol

Edited by: "mds1256" 16th Apr 2011
If the quantity decreases by one half in a characteristic time, then you will get a graph that curves down rapidly to begin with and then tails off.
I will look for an example.

like this:
graph
Edited by: "chesso" 16th Apr 2011
When you say will form a straight line does that mean a straight line or.a straight diagonal line?
mds1256

When you say will form a straight line does that mean a straight line … When you say will form a straight line does that mean a straight line or.a straight diagonal line?



no, it will be a curved line as per the graphical evidence above ^^^^^

In exponential decay, the rate of change decreases over time - the rate … In exponential decay, the rate of change decreases over time - the rate of the decay becomes slower as time passes. Since the rate of change is not constant (the same) across the entire graph, these functions are not straight lines.

http://regentsprep.org/REgents/math/ALGEBRA/AE7/fixpic1.gif
That's great thanks!
Edited by: "mds1256" 16th Apr 2011
mds1256

When you say will form a straight line does that mean a straight line … When you say will form a straight line does that mean a straight line or.a straight diagonal line?


If will be a sloped line but depends on base of logs most people will assume natural logs (2.7 odd) as it's whats mostly found in science.

Answered and closed at OP request

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