Any roofing experts?

7
Posted 24th Nov
Hi there,

I am looking to buy a property - I am a first time buyer. It’s a top floor flat that’s nearly six years old. It has a (from the outside) seemingly flat roof. Having looked at satellite view, I can see there appears to be a slight pitch on the roof.

I know flat roofs have a limited lifespan and am worried - being at the top - that this might make it a bad purchase decision?

There is a factoring fee of £60pm which includes building insurance.

The builder is Charles Church.

Can anyone with roofing experience share some info? It may be that these types of roofs in modern times are much more reliable.
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If it is 6 years old it is highly unlikely that it will need any work done to the roof for a good few years. Average life span of a modern flat roof is 20-25 years.
Depending on if the property is in England or Scotland there are different rules, but if it is in need of repair or replacement it will require a shared cost with the other flat owners / lease holders / there is usually a management company involved in England.
If you just decide you want to replace it without needing done then you might have to pay for it all.
BaronVonDouche24/11/2019 09:23

If it is 6 years old it is highly unlikely that it will need any work done …If it is 6 years old it is highly unlikely that it will need any work done to the roof for a good few years. Average life span of a modern flat roof is 20-25 years. Depending on if the property is in England or Scotland there are different rules, but if it is in need of repair or replacement it will require a shared cost with the other flat owners / lease holders / there is usually a management company involved in England.If you just decide you want to replace it without needing done then you might have to pay for it all.


Thank you. It’s in Scotland. The home report doesn’t indicate any issues with the roof. Just conscious if it leaks, I’ll be the first to have issues.
shnp24/11/2019 09:26

Thank you. It’s in Scotland. The home report doesn’t indicate any issues …Thank you. It’s in Scotland. The home report doesn’t indicate any issues with the roof. Just conscious if it leaks, I’ll be the first to have issues.


In that case everyone in the block is liable for shared costs on any roof repairs, can be hard to get everyone on board as nobody wants to pay for anything, but it is probably on their deeds etc.

But as it's only 6 years old I wouldn't expect any problems for a while yet.
Edited by: "BaronVonDouche" 24th Nov
To be honest, if you bought a normal detached bungalow you would still have to worry about roof repairs at some stage that you would need to pay for on your own, at least in a flat everyone is supposed to chip in.

But then there is always your Home insurance in both cases.
The home report for the property was perfect (all ones), but this comment bothers me:

“Sections of the flooring were noted to be rather creaky in places when weight tested, a not untypical occurrence in a property of this age.”

Having viewed the property yesterday, I didn’t notice any creaking. With reference to the comment above, when they mention a property of this age do they mean that it’s normal to have creaky floors in a relatively new building?

If I decide to go ahead I’d obviously get a proper survey done, but just curious.
You have 3 issues to consider

The property; It's 6 years old so should be in good condition. Its built by a reputable builder (if such a thing exists but they have been around a while). But flat roofs are always worry in the longer term. You can read about them here homeadviceguide.com/fla…st/

The survey. A home report is a 'walk in, look around, walk out' style of report. It does not move furniture, lift carpets or go into a loft space (which you presumably don't have). It does not involve using a damp meter. Its WYSIWYG only.

The Management Company; THIS IS THE MONSTER BIGGIE. FORGET THE FEW BOB IT WOULD COST TO RE-ROOF. Your conveyance agent should be all over this like a rash. For background; I am a director of one such company and have dealt with several others

If you cant see or smell a damp problem and you have looked in every cupboard etc, you quite possibly don't have an issue on a 6 year old property. But at the scary end of the scale, if you have a defective management company, you may well not be able to sell the property.

Sadly, some builders like to set these companies up to fund their retirement and/or keep their children in funds. Giving the Leaseholders a vehicle to manage their properties is a secondary factor. I have no idea how Charles Church approaches them but for your own sake, please do the research on how yours is setup and how it compares to Charles Church developments.

The company should publish accounts and you can download them from Companies House. Read them and understand them to find out if everyone is paying their money and how much the management company is taking in fees. In the UK, You should get a copy of the last 3 years of accounts and the minutes of the ANNUAL meeting. No Minutes tells you the company may not be doing its job. Find out about the insurance policy and who is acting as they agent (thus receiving commission).

Your biggest source of comfort and knowledge will be to know on the doors of a few flats and find out how your neighbours react.

Hope fully all is sweetness and light in your case. I would expect it to be so on a 6 year old Charles Church development. But if ti isn't, the time to find out is before you buy, not after.
shnp24/11/2019 09:55

The home report for the property was perfect (all ones), but this comment …The home report for the property was perfect (all ones), but this comment bothers me:“Sections of the flooring were noted to be rather creaky in places when weight tested, a not untypical occurrence in a property of this age.”Having viewed the property yesterday, I didn’t notice any creaking. With reference to the comment above, when they mention a property of this age do they mean that it’s normal to have creaky floors in a relatively new building?If I decide to go ahead I’d obviously get a proper survey done, but just curious.



Sounds like cheap (but sadly common) chipboard flooring rather than T&G and all properties move for quite a few years. Very, very, very common issue. Can sometimes be fixed with taking up carpets, using large head screws and having patience
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