Anyone got a radiator valve and wall room thermostat in the same room?

16
Posted 15th Sep
I have had radiators with TRV fitted and a wall thermostat in the same room, mainly the corridor. I haven't had an issue but when I got some new radiators replaced recently, I was told that I should not have a TRV fitted to the radiator if it is the same room as the wall thermostat.

I have never heard of this before and when I googled this, it seems to state that the engineer is right but it didn't seem to think it was a big issue if you did have both in the same room.

Anyone got both in the same room and can comment on whether you have had any issue?
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I have both in same room and not an issue.
Congrats on 1106
16 Comments
I haven't got a radiator thermostat and a system thermostat in the same room. should not be an issue if set correctly BUT if the rad thermo switches rad off the system thermo will never know that it is getting hot and therefore will not switch your system heating off
We here a £40 wireless thermostat that moves about the house plus trv on all the rads. Thermostat has a table stand
Edited by: "wayners" 15th Sep
I have both in same room and not an issue.
Congrats on 1106
tardytortoise15/09/2019 17:10

I haven't got a radiator thermostat and a system thermostat in the same …I haven't got a radiator thermostat and a system thermostat in the same room. should not be an issue if set correctly BUT if the rad thermo switches rad off the system thermo will never know that it is getting hot and therefore will not switch your system heating off


i don't understand your explanation. if the TRV on the hall radiator is set to off, why does the room thermostat in the hall not know the house is getting too hot, if i am reading your explanation correctly?
mutley115/09/2019 17:31

i don't understand your explanation. if the TRV on the hall radiator is …i don't understand your explanation. if the TRV on the hall radiator is set to off, why does the room thermostat in the hall not know the house is getting too hot, if i am reading your explanation correctly?


Because if the TRV on the radiator in hallway is set to off the hallway will be cold. If the hallway is cold then the room thermostat in the hallway will detect that coldness and keep the boiler on trying indefinitely to heat the room with a radiator that is basically turned off. You need to set the TRV in the hallway to max, therefore no point in having it there.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 15th Sep
Keep the TRV fully opened all the time. The thermostat will be your control for when the boiler fires on and off.
My understanding on fixed thermostat.
If thermostat is set for 30 but you turn trv for temp 20. The thermostat will try to work until it reaches 30. Overworking itself and more temp in other rooms.
So all rooms can have trv except where fixed thermostat is.
OllieSt15/09/2019 18:00

Because if the TRV on the radiator in hallway is set to off the hallway …Because if the TRV on the radiator in hallway is set to off the hallway will be cold. If the hallway is cold then the room thermostat in the hallway will detect that coldness and keep the boiler on trying indefinitely to heat the room with a radiator that is basically turned off. You need to set the TRV in the hallway to max, therefore no point in having it there.



puts it better than i did
so if setting the TRV in the hall to off but the room thermostat to 28, then the boiler will stay on even if the rest of the house has reached 28 because the hall is cold and the room thermostat can only tell the temperature in the hall, where it is situated.

if setting the TRV in the hall to max and the room thermostat to 28. then when the hall gets to 28 the boiler will be switched by the room thermostat even if the rest of the house has not reached 28?

it puzzles me what the point of the room thermostat is, if it only measures the temperature within the room it is located!
mutley115/09/2019 17:31

i don't understand your explanation. if the TRV on the hall radiator is …i don't understand your explanation. if the TRV on the hall radiator is set to off, why does the room thermostat in the hall not know the house is getting too hot, if i am reading your explanation correctly?



the room thermostat in the hall controls the whole house heating.
if the thermostat senses the temperature in the hall is too hot it will switch off the heating to the whole of the house
if the thermostat senses the temperature in the hall is too cold it will switch on the heating to the whole of the house
so any radiator in the hall with a TRV needs to have its setting in such a way that it does not adversely and artificially affect the whole house heating
remember TRVs fitted to radiators in any room in the house are there mostly to prevent the room being overheated. BUT jf the main heating is off they cannot be used to heat that room.
Edited by: "tardytortoise" 15th Sep
mutley115/09/2019 19:14

so if setting the TRV in the hall to off but the room thermostat to 28, …so if setting the TRV in the hall to off but the room thermostat to 28, then the boiler will stay on even if the rest of the house has reached 28 because the hall is cold and the room thermostat can only tell the temperature in the hall, where it is situated.if setting the TRV in the hall to max and the room thermostat to 28. then when the hall gets to 28 the boiler will be switched by the room thermostat even if the rest of the house has not reached 28?it puzzles me what the point of the room thermostat is, if it only measures the temperature within the room it is located!



total heating thermostats were invented first
individual room thermostats were invented afterwards and are only needed on radiators in rooms that dont need to be kept as warm as other areas of the house. if you dont have a whole system thermostat somewhere then you cannot rely on the temperature to switch the heating on and off - you would have to do it manually
Edited by: "tardytortoise" 15th Sep
Mutters - when will you stop using these ice cream salesmen masquerading as Plumbers /CH engineers . A TRV is a local thermostat - a thermostat is a err …….. thermostat . Work it out for yourself for once - or put the thermostat in the hall ! - its not rocket science
If the system thermostat does not receive enough heat from an uncontrolled radiator, then the boiler will cycle continuously to maintain heat (like it would in an old gravity hot water / pumped radiator system), also, you do not want the pump to try to push water through a system where every radiator has a TRV that is closed.

Before TRV, the individual room radiators needed to be carefully balanced by adjusting the valves. TRVs make it easier to damp down a hot spot radiator, or to run bedrooms a bit cooler, but you do need the feedback from the system thermostat to allow a more efficient boiler operation, whether an old type or a more modern condensing that is most efficient when heavily loaded.

If the thermostat gets heat from other rooms that are not TRV (like mine which is closer to the doorway of the downstairs rooms, while the hall radiator predominantly send heat up the stairs to the landing, then it may have enough feedback
Edited by: "matth9999" 17th Sep
matth999917/09/2019 23:28

If the system thermostat does not receive enough heat from an uncontrolled …If the system thermostat does not receive enough heat from an uncontrolled radiator, then the boiler will cycle continuously to maintain heat (like it would in an old gravity hot water / pumped radiator system), also, you do not want the pump to try to push water through a system where every radiator has a TRV that is closed.Before TRV, the individual room radiators needed to be carefully balanced by adjusting the valves. TRVs make it easier to damp down a hot spot radiator, or to run bedrooms a bit cooler, but you do need the feedback from the system thermostat to allow a more efficient boiler operation, whether an old type or a more modern condensing that is most efficient when heavily loaded.If the thermostat gets heat from other rooms that are not TRV (like mine which is closer to the doorway of the downstairs rooms, while the hall radiator predominantly send heat up the stairs to the landing, then it may have enough feedback


i am still not sure if i have the system set up right. i have a radiator in the hall that is directly opposite to a honeywell programmer / room thermostat. if i leave the TRV on this radiator on full and all the other TRV in the house on full, this should not be an issue? what if the room thermostat thinks the house is already hot and turns the boiler off as it is getting a near heat source from the hall radiator opposite?
If the other areas aren't warm enough, then you may have to lower that one and let warmth bleed from other rooms
matth999920/09/2019 01:09

If the other areas aren't warm enough, then you may have to lower that one …If the other areas aren't warm enough, then you may have to lower that one and let warmth bleed from other rooms


yeah, was thinking that. it sounds like you shouldn't have a room thermostat near to a radiator as the heat from the radiator will confuse the thermostat. we had the boiler installed last year and the engineer did not say anything about this being an issue. i had radiators replaced at another property recently and the engineer said this was going to be an issue as i had a room thermostat in the hall upstairs and the radiator with TRV in the hall downstairs. he said that is still in the same room space, which i think is a bit OTT as they are very far from one another.

it would appear that opinion is divided on TRV and room thermostat being in the same room space between engineers and reading on the net, some articles state this is a no no but other articles state this is not a real issue. not really great when you are trying to work out who is right.
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