Anyone got Netflix UHD share ?

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Posted 27th Oct
Hi. Looking for a Netflix share if anyone has any spare slots let me know please ?
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This kind of post is why Netflix is cracking down on multi screen.
Looking for a slot too.....
Flaminguy27/10/2019 18:34

This kind of post is why Netflix is cracking down on multi screen.


No they're not
chocci28/10/2019 07:01

No they're not


Yes, they are.

waow.com/new…ts/

In a Netflix earnings call, the streaming platform said it’s focused on preventing customers from sharing accounts and trading passwords.

Its chief product officer said they’re still looking for ways to make that happen.

Right now, the cost of a basic plan is $8.99 per month, which allows a user to stream on a single screen at a time.

Other slightly more expensive plans allow users to watch on additional screens.

According to a survey done by Magid for CNBC, nearly 10% of Netflix users don’t pay for their accounts.

Netflix has the ability to end an account or put it on hold at any time to prevent fraudulent actions.

popculture.com/str…ng/

Don't expect to share your Netflix password with your extended family and friends and be able to get away with it. Having multiple households on one Netflix account could start to become a thing of the past, as the streaming giant is well aware of the issue and has plans in the distant future to crack down on it.

Netflix's quarterly earnings call this week saw product chief Greg Peters acknowledge that password sharing was an issue that the company was aware of. However, Peters explained that there was no clear timeline for trying to stop account-sharing, meaning that password-borrowers might not have to freak out just yet.


"We continue to monitor [password sharing]," Peters said during the quarterly earnings call. "We'll continue to look at the situation and we'll see those consumer-friendly ways to push on the edge of that, but we've got no big plans at this point in time in terms of doing something different there."

While a basic Netflix plan allowing for a user to stream on one screen at a single time costs $8.99 per month, for nearly double that ($15.99 per month), a single Netflix account can be accessed on four different screens at the same time. However, the plan is meant to apply to a single household only, as per Netflix's terms and conditions. "Any content viewed through the service are for your personal and non-commercial use only and may not be shared with individuals beyond your household," the terms state.


If Netflix suspects fraudulent actions, the company has the ability to end an account or put it on hold.

While Netflix hasn't done a ton to limit password and account sharing it sounds like the company may be in the midst of trying to decipher a way to restrict it — though their timeline and course of action is unclear.




fastcompany.com/904…own

Password sharing is a victimless crime to consumers, but a survey late last year by the research firm Magid estimated that Netflix loses more than $135 million each month due to just under 10% of its customers sharing their passwords. That may not sound like a lot, but it amounts to about 13.7 million people. (If password sharing held steady as a percentage of Netflix’s total audience, that number would now be about 15 million.) If Netflix were able to get those consumers to pay, it’d add the equivalent of six months of its projected growth in subscribers, and it would improve its operating margins with the additional revenue it’d receive for a service it’s currently paying to deliver for free.

Password users are, as you might suspect, younger consumers, the kind Netflix is most interested in wooing, especially as the streaming wars heat up. That Magid survey says millennials are the biggest offenders, with 35% sharing compared with 19% of Generation X and 13% of Baby Boomers. This would make economic sense as it’s likely consumers helping out friends who might have less household income to have a recurring Netflix subscription.

There’s also the question of whether it’s actually piracy or just a community looking out for one another, particularly in cases where multiple households may collectively pay for one account, and that’s where things get more complex.


The answer to the piracy versus community conundrum is that it’s both. Cracking down on password sharing is also a cybersecurity issue, due to password thieves, and there are companies with dedicated products dedicated to the task. For example, Synamedia, a London-based software provider, has been testing a cybersecurity software called Credentials Sharing Insight since last year with various cable and satellite companies that offer streaming—think Cox, Comcast, and Verizon. “Credential Sharing Insights is predictive analytics as a service, with the goal of detecting and allowing responses to credential sharing,” says Orly Amsalem, product manager at Synamedia. “We are also looking into cases where credentials are used fraudulently, meaning identity theft [and] organizations that are compromising [security] with different data breaches, and eventually, putting passwords on sale in marketplaces, jeopardizing the digital identity of those subscribers and of our customers.”

Synamedia declined to say if Netflix is a client or not, but Amsalem notes that companies are aware that while families and friends may knowingly share passwords, there are also actual pirates who steal data from paying customers and sell it to anyone who wants access to an authentic account at the expense of an unknowing subscriber.

Netflix has acknowledged that it’s thinking about the password sharing issue, but how does it plan to convince freeloaders—not to be mistaken for pirates—who haven’t been converted into loyal subscribers to actually pay for an account? Very gently. In response to an analyst’s question about policing password sharing more actively, Greg Peters, Netflix’s chief product officer, said, “We continue to monitor it, so we’re looking at the situation, and we’ll see those consumer-friendly ways to push on the edges of that. But I think we’ve got no big plans to announce at this point and time in terms of doing something differently there.”

In other words, Netflix understands that taking extreme measures to reduce password sharing could be risky. It could alienate not only potential subscribers into the arms of Hulu, Apple TV+, Disney+, or eventually HBO Max or Peacock but also its current subscribers, some of whom are the ones with passwords being shared. Weighing options potentially means utilizing software like Credential Sharing Insights and figuring out solutions that make customers—and by extension, the parties they share passwords with—feel valued and motivated enough to spend money. Spoiler alert: it’s actually not by limiting the devices that subscribers can watch at the same time, or even in decreasing prices, which reps from Synamedia say are common beliefs in the industry. “The opportunity that we see here is to monetize sharing, and by actually reviewing the motivation of the intentions behind the sharing, whether they are sharing with their family and friends and so on, and understanding what type of sharing can actually be used for monetization,” Amsalem says. “For example, if you can reveal that there are parents that are sharing with their kids that aren’t in their household anymore—for example, the kid went to college or lives in their own household—we can identify that, then the service provider can actually leverage that and offer an upgrade in a customer-friendly way and eventually monetize and maximize the subscriber’s value.”

This also applies to security and figuring out how to notify customers that they’ve been compromised. As far as marketing efforts are concerned, what will people do when forced to make a definitive choice? Imagine logging in to your sister’s account and being offered your own login and password for an add on of x-amount extra per month. Would you pay up?

Historically, people—assuming we’re talking about honest-ish password sharers—go where the shows with massive cult followings are, which helps explain why Netflix just announced plans to raise yet another $2 billion in debt to fund production, development, and new content acquisitions. However, if the industry is losing money, then that also affects the quality of content because it takes money to deliver good entertainment.


Nothing breaks a password sharer like new shows and movies good enough to pay for.
Edited by: "Flaminguy" 28th Oct
Flaminguy28/10/2019 07:09

Yes, they are. …Yes, they are. https://waow.com/news/top-stories/2019/10/24/netflix-to-crack-down-on-shared-accounts/In a Netflix earnings call, the streaming platform said it’s focused on preventing customers from sharing accounts and trading passwords.Its chief product officer said they’re still looking for ways to make that happen.Right now, the cost of a basic plan is $8.99 per month, which allows a user to stream on a single screen at a time.Other slightly more expensive plans allow users to watch on additional screens.According to a survey done by Magid for CNBC, nearly 10% of Netflix users don’t pay for their accounts.Netflix has the ability to end an account or put it on hold at any time to prevent fraudulent actions.https://popculture.com/streaming/2019/10/23/netflix-expected-start-cracking-down-password-sharing/Don't expect to share your Netflix password with your extended family and friends and be able to get away with it. Having multiple households on one Netflix account could start to become a thing of the past, as the streaming giant is well aware of the issue and has plans in the distant future to crack down on it.Netflix's quarterly earnings call this week saw product chief Greg Peters acknowledge that password sharing was an issue that the company was aware of. However, Peters explained that there was no clear timeline for trying to stop account-sharing, meaning that password-borrowers might not have to freak out just yet."We continue to monitor [password sharing]," Peters said during the quarterly earnings call. "We'll continue to look at the situation and we'll see those consumer-friendly ways to push on the edge of that, but we've got no big plans at this point in time in terms of doing something different there."While a basic Netflix plan allowing for a user to stream on one screen at a single time costs $8.99 per month, for nearly double that ($15.99 per month), a single Netflix account can be accessed on four different screens at the same time. However, the plan is meant to apply to a single household only, as per Netflix's terms and conditions. "Any content viewed through the service are for your personal and non-commercial use only and may not be shared with individuals beyond your household," the terms state.If Netflix suspects fraudulent actions, the company has the ability to end an account or put it on hold.While Netflix hasn't done a ton to limit password and account sharing it sounds like the company may be in the midst of trying to decipher a way to restrict it — though their timeline and course of action is unclear.https://www.fastcompany.com/90420891/the-perils-of-netflixs-rumored-password-sharing-crackdownPassword sharing is a victimless crime to consumers, but a survey late last year by the research firm Magid estimated that Netflix loses more than $135 million each month due to just under 10% of its customers sharing their passwords. That may not sound like a lot, but it amounts to about 13.7 million people. (If password sharing held steady as a percentage of Netflix’s total audience, that number would now be about 15 million.) If Netflix were able to get those consumers to pay, it’d add the equivalent of six months of its projected growth in subscribers, and it would improve its operating margins with the additional revenue it’d receive for a service it’s currently paying to deliver for free.Password users are, as you might suspect, younger consumers, the kind Netflix is most interested in wooing, especially as the streaming wars heat up. That Magid survey says millennials are the biggest offenders, with 35% sharing compared with 19% of Generation X and 13% of Baby Boomers. This would make economic sense as it’s likely consumers helping out friends who might have less household income to have a recurring Netflix subscription.There’s also the question of whether it’s actually piracy or just a community looking out for one another, particularly in cases where multiple households may collectively pay for one account, and that’s where things get more complex.The answer to the piracy versus community conundrum is that it’s both. Cracking down on password sharing is also a cybersecurity issue, due to password thieves, and there are companies with dedicated products dedicated to the task. For example, Synamedia, a London-based software provider, has been testing a cybersecurity software called Credentials Sharing Insight since last year with various cable and satellite companies that offer streaming—think Cox, Comcast, and Verizon. “Credential Sharing Insights is predictive analytics as a service, with the goal of detecting and allowing responses to credential sharing,” says Orly Amsalem, product manager at Synamedia. “We are also looking into cases where credentials are used fraudulently, meaning identity theft [and] organizations that are compromising [security] with different data breaches, and eventually, putting passwords on sale in marketplaces, jeopardizing the digital identity of those subscribers and of our customers.”Synamedia declined to say if Netflix is a client or not, but Amsalem notes that companies are aware that while families and friends may knowingly share passwords, there are also actual pirates who steal data from paying customers and sell it to anyone who wants access to an authentic account at the expense of an unknowing subscriber.Netflix has acknowledged that it’s thinking about the password sharing issue, but how does it plan to convince freeloaders—not to be mistaken for pirates—who haven’t been converted into loyal subscribers to actually pay for an account? Very gently. In response to an analyst’s question about policing password sharing more actively, Greg Peters, Netflix’s chief product officer, said, “We continue to monitor it, so we’re looking at the situation, and we’ll see those consumer-friendly ways to push on the edges of that. But I think we’ve got no big plans to announce at this point and time in terms of doing something differently there.”In other words, Netflix understands that taking extreme measures to reduce password sharing could be risky. It could alienate not only potential subscribers into the arms of Hulu, Apple TV+, Disney+, or eventually HBO Max or Peacock but also its current subscribers, some of whom are the ones with passwords being shared. Weighing options potentially means utilizing software like Credential Sharing Insights and figuring out solutions that make customers—and by extension, the parties they share passwords with—feel valued and motivated enough to spend money. Spoiler alert: it’s actually not by limiting the devices that subscribers can watch at the same time, or even in decreasing prices, which reps from Synamedia say are common beliefs in the industry. “The opportunity that we see here is to monetize sharing, and by actually reviewing the motivation of the intentions behind the sharing, whether they are sharing with their family and friends and so on, and understanding what type of sharing can actually be used for monetization,” Amsalem says. “For example, if you can reveal that there are parents that are sharing with their kids that aren’t in their household anymore—for example, the kid went to college or lives in their own household—we can identify that, then the service provider can actually leverage that and offer an upgrade in a customer-friendly way and eventually monetize and maximize the subscriber’s value.”This also applies to security and figuring out how to notify customers that they’ve been compromised. As far as marketing efforts are concerned, what will people do when forced to make a definitive choice? Imagine logging in to your sister’s account and being offered your own login and password for an add on of x-amount extra per month. Would you pay up?Historically, people—assuming we’re talking about honest-ish password sharers—go where the shows with massive cult followings are, which helps explain why Netflix just announced plans to raise yet another $2 billion in debt to fund production, development, and new content acquisitions. However, if the industry is losing money, then that also affects the quality of content because it takes money to deliver good entertainment.Nothing breaks a password sharer like new shows and movies good enough to pay for.


Tldr but they've been promising a crackdown since 2013. It's never gonna happen
chocci28/10/2019 07:16

Tldr but they've been promising a crackdown since 2013. It's never gonna …Tldr but they've been promising a crackdown since 2013. It's never gonna happen


And yet us honest users keep finding our prices going up.
Flaminguy28/10/2019 07:19

And yet us honest users keep finding our prices going up.


Its hardly dishonest to share, unless there is a law against it......
chocci28/10/2019 09:20

Its hardly dishonest to share, unless there is a law against it......


If they make it against their terms and conditions then we'll all end up with subscriptions binded to our machines MAC addresses like Sky Go, so those of us who do have more than two devices will end up having to buy the more expensive plans purely because other people were abusing the existing policy that allows us to take our content with us on our laptops, tablets and phones when we're not watching it at home.

It was never designed or supposed to be for giving to friends to use, because all you are doing is depriving Netflix of your friend paying for their own subscription and keeping the whole system funded.

If Netflix decide to do that, then yes, it will be illigal, exactly the same as stealing Sky tv channels with card sharing and pirate streams. So thanks for that..
Edited by: "Flaminguy" 28th Oct
Flaminguy28/10/2019 09:39

If they make it against their terms and conditions then we'll all end up …If they make it against their terms and conditions then we'll all end up with subscriptions binded to our machines MAC addresses like Sky Go, so those of us who do have more than two devices will end up having to buy the more expensive plans purely because other people were abusing the existing policy that allows us to take our content with us on our laptops, tablets and phones when we're not watching it at home. It was never designed or supposed to be for giving to friends to use, because all you are doing is depriving Netflix of your friend paying for their own subscription and keeping the whole system funded.If Netflix decide to do that, then yes, it will be illigal, exactly the same as stealing Sky tv channels with card sharing and pirate streams. So thanks for that..


So, it's not dishonest now in the slightest. Thanks for confirming.


Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has spoken openly about customers sharing their monthly subscription with other people.

"We love people sharing Netflix," said company CEO Reed Hastings at the Consumer Electronics Show.

"That's a positive thing, not a negative thing."
Edited by: "chocci" 28th Oct
chocci28/10/2019 09:52

So, it's not dishonest now in the slightest. Thanks for confirming.


Of course it's dishonest. You're paying a subscription to use on your devices, and yet you're giving them to other people to use on their devices without paying. Don't try to justify blatant theft. I bet you give your mates copies of DVD's and CD's too.
Flaminguy28/10/2019 09:55

Of course it's dishonest. You're paying a subscription to use on your …Of course it's dishonest. You're paying a subscription to use on your devices, and yet you're giving them to other people to use on their devices without paying. Don't try to justify blatant theft. I bet you give your mates copies of DVD's and CD's too.


DVDs and cds? Is this 2010?

Still awaiting proof that Netflix terms state it is illegal to share across households......
chocci28/10/2019 09:52

So, it's not dishonest now in the slightest. Thanks for confirming.Netflix …So, it's not dishonest now in the slightest. Thanks for confirming.Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has spoken openly about customers sharing their monthly subscription with other people."We love people sharing Netflix," said company CEO Reed Hastings at the Consumer Electronics Show."That's a positive thing, not a negative thing."



birminghammail.co.uk/new…230
Netflix users illegally sharing account passwords set to be tracked down by new AI
Flaminguy28/10/2019 09:57

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/showbiz-tv/netflix-users-illegally-sharing-account-15658230Netflix users illegally sharing account passwords set to be tracked down by new AI


Still awaiting proof that Netflix terms state it is illegal to share across households......
chocci28/10/2019 10:00

Still awaiting proof that Netflix terms state it is illegal to share …Still awaiting proof that Netflix terms state it is illegal to share across households......


You've been given it, but ignore because you are perfectly happy stealing.
Flaminguy28/10/2019 10:01

You've been given it, but ignore because you are perfectly happy stealing.


Where?

I don't even use Netflix. Torrents ftw
chocci28/10/2019 10:02

Where? I don't even use Netflix. Torrents ftw


You're a terrible person. As an independent artist myself, people like you stealing revenue out of the pockets of people like me are the lowest of the low. You might as well be breaking into my bank account and stealing money.

You might wish to read up on the Computer Misuse Act, although I doubt you'll care until you get caught.
Edited by: "Flaminguy" 28th Oct
Heated debate going on lol
Flaminguy28/10/2019 10:06

You're a terrible person. As an independent artist myself, people like you …You're a terrible person. As an independent artist myself, people like you stealing revenue out of the pockets of people like me are the lowest of the low. You might as well be breaking into my bank account and stealing money.You might wish to read up on the Computer Misuse Act, although I doubt you'll care until you get caught.


Bit judgemental. Cry me a river.
Flaminguy28/10/2019 10:06

You're a terrible person. As an independent artist myself, people like you …You're a terrible person. As an independent artist myself, people like you stealing revenue out of the pockets of people like me are the lowest of the low. You might as well be breaking into my bank account and stealing money.You might wish to read up on the Computer Misuse Act, although I doubt you'll care until you get caught.


😴
Flaminguy28/10/2019 10:01

You've been given it, but ignore because you are perfectly happy stealing.


You’re in the wrong discussion mate, this is for people who want a deal on Netflix, not a lecture on legalities of it.
0211matt29/10/2019 07:52

You’re in the wrong discussion mate, this is for people who want a deal on …You’re in the wrong discussion mate, this is for people who want a deal on Netflix, not a lecture on legalities of it.


That won't help you if you're convicted under the computer misuse act and digital millenium copyright act.
Flaminguy29/10/2019 07:55

That won't help you if you're convicted under the computer misuse act and …That won't help you if you're convicted under the computer misuse act and digital millenium copyright act.


Stop spouting nonsense. It's tedious.
Flaminguy29/10/2019 08:31

https://crimestoppers-uk.org/keeping-safe/online-safety/illegal-streaming-know-the-risks


Lol

Total UK prosecutions for home streaming = zero
Flaminguy30/10/2019 06:41

Guess again …Guess again kidhttps://www.techradar.com/news/uk-man-given-first-custodial-sentence-for-piracy-as-torrent-sites-continue-to-flourishhttps://www.broadbandtvnews.com/2019/03/19/long-prison-sentences-for-uk-torrent-pirates/


Learn to read properly

'home streaming', not illegally distributing
chocci30/10/2019 06:45

Learn to read properly 'home streaming', not illegally distributing


I think the real problem here is poor parenting. A complete disconnect with adults. You should make every effort to manage that and ensure you do your utmost to avoid bringing innocent people into your world.
Flaminguy30/10/2019 07:45

I think the real problem here is poor parenting. A complete disconnect …I think the real problem here is poor parenting. A complete disconnect with adults. You should make every effort to manage that and ensure you do your utmost to avoid bringing innocent people into your world.


Great comeback lol
chocci30/10/2019 07:47

Great comeback lol


Try arguing with another millennial.
Edited by: "Flaminguy" 30th Oct
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