Anyone recommend a place for cheap radiators and any info on changing singles to new doubles please?

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Found 30th Jan
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Original Poster
I’m after changing these radiators myself so I can have shiny new ones to go with the room once I redecorate it. I’ve never done it before so any advice would be great thanks
Homebase were selling them for £45 or £55 for doubles in the sale recently?
They look like "Myson Premier Roundtop HE Radiators." Quality radiator - nice looking with the round top. I am guessing yours look like single panels without any convector (fins on the back to increase the heat transfer area).

directheatingsupplies.co.uk/mys…ors

Simplest thing to do is purchase the same brand of radiator, same size (height/width) - that should fit on the existing wall fittings and need minimal adjustment of the piping. If you are after more heat output you can get a single convector, a double radiator (with a single convector) or a double with a double convector.

For your size radiator have a look on the above link under the specs for the BTU output (this is how much heat can be output from each radiator). There are guides online on how much heat a room needs based on floor area and no. outside walls etc - have a google to find. This will tell you what type of radiator you will need - single....... double (double convector).

Actually changing the radiator is a straight forward mechanical job - but the fittings for the radiator valves will be further from the wall than at present. These dimensions will be on the above link and will tell you whether you will be able to just spring the pipework (force) to fit or whether some modification is necessary - you will likely be able to spring for a single convector but a double panel will likely need the pipework to me modded to move further from the wall. Pipework mods are simple if you've cut and soldered copper pipes before - if not perhaps more than a beginners project!


Edit - the above link may not be the cheapest, just the first one I found for your brand, worth googling for a few other prices.

Edit - here is a BTU calculator for radiator size.... bestheating.com/btu…tor

Edit - These are the standouts from the wall to the centre of the water inlet/oulet nozzles that your pipework must reach.....

. Single Panel & Convector – 45mm

. Double Panel/Single Convector – 70mm

. Double Panel/Double Convector – 83mm
Edited by: "Van1973" 30th Jan
Screwfix are doing free TRV and lockshield valves with all Kudox radiators at the moment - example - screwfix.com/p/k…901
Original Poster
Van197350 m ago

They look like "Myson Premier Roundtop HE Radiators." Quality radiator …They look like "Myson Premier Roundtop HE Radiators." Quality radiator - nice looking with the round top. I am guessing yours look like single panels without any convector (fins on the back to increase the heat transfer area).http://www.directheatingsupplies.co.uk/myson-premier-roundtop-he-radiatorsSimplest thing to do is purchase the same brand of radiator, same size (height/width) - that should fit on the existing wall fittings and need minimal adjustment of the piping. If you are after more heat output you can get a single convector, a double radiator (with a single convector) or a double with a double convector. For your size radiator have a look on the above link under the specs for the BTU output (this is how much heat can be output from each radiator). There are guides online on how much heat a room needs based on floor area and no. outside walls etc - have a google to find. This will tell you what type of radiator you will need - single....... double (double convector).Actually changing the radiator is a straight forward mechanical job - but the fittings for the radiator valves will be further from the wall than at present. These dimensions will be on the above link and will tell you whether you will be able to just spring the pipework (force) to fit or whether some modification is necessary - you will likely be able to spring for a single convector but a double panel will likely need the pipework to me modded to move further from the wall. Pipework mods are simple if you've cut and soldered copper pipes before - if not perhaps more than a beginners project!Edit - the above link may not be the cheapest, just the first one I found for your brand, worth googling for a few other prices.Edit - here is a BTU calculator for radiator size.... http://www.bestheating.com/btu-calculatorEdit - These are the standouts from the wall to the centre of the water inlet/oulet nozzles that your pipework must reach..... . Single Panel & Convector – 45mm. Double Panel/Single Convector – 70mm. Double Panel/Double Convector – 83mm

33167325-RvnNB.jpg
It’s like this at the back of it and the dimensions are roughly 530 x 1150. The pipes seem to move away from the wall easy enough. I’m happy enough to keep same sizes I’m just unsure on valves and stopping the water from flowing either end when removing. Thanks for your in-depth comments 😊
Screwfix
Original Poster
To be fair the radiators are not rusty but could with a paint and I thought it would be easier just to change them as the temp valves on the side have had it.
My guess was wrong - you already have a single panel single convector.

So to upgrade you need either of these doubles..... directheatingsupplies.co.uk/mys…149

The single convector would give an output of 4920 BTU/hr ( a 46% increase from now) whereas a double convector would give 6324 BTU/hr (an 88% increase). Use the calculator in the edits of my first post to see what size your room needs.

A Double panel/single convector would need the pipework to be sprung 25mm whereas a double convector 38mm.


If you are going to do the job yourself you would need to drain the system down - if you have a Combi boiler isolate the water at the boiler, if a header tank stop the water filling the tank. As you have pipework running along the skirting I guess you have concrete floors - somewhere on the pipework you will have a drain down point where you can fit a garden hose and run it outside.

I would lift and pull the carpet back as you are likely to have some water remaining in the radiator when you break the fittings at the radiator valves - and it will be black! Have someone help you lift the radiator outside - not heavy but to minimise spills/drips onto other carpets. The radiator just lifts off the brackets - lift an inch or so then pull it forward to remove. Then it is a case of just lifting the new radiator onto the existing brackets (which should fit the new rad) and then connecting the inlet/out pipework. Then refill - every radiator in the house will need bleeding!

Sounds complicated but it really isn't. Have a look on youtube - there will be many vids to watch. You can buy pipe freezing kits to avoid draining the whole system but I would not recommend these for a first timer - best to have the whole system drained!!
rollercoaster6312 m ago

To be fair the radiators are not rusty but could with a paint and I …To be fair the radiators are not rusty but could with a paint and I thought it would be easier just to change them as the temp valves on the side have had it.


If you don't need any more heat in the room I would just paint them! I paint mine the same colour as the walls using Satinwood paint.

You could change the valves if you wanted (would need a drain down) or even just the plastic caps if they are looking a bit rough.
Van19732 h, 40 m ago

My guess was wrong - you already have a single panel single convector.So …My guess was wrong - you already have a single panel single convector.So to upgrade you need either of these doubles..... http://www.directheatingsupplies.co.uk/myson-premier-he-roundtop-k2-radiator-21dc45-530-x-1149The single convector would give an output of 4920 BTU/hr ( a 46% increase from now) whereas a double convector would give 6324 BTU/hr (an 88% increase). Use the calculator in the edits of my first post to see what size your room needs.A Double panel/single convector would need the pipework to be sprung 25mm whereas a double convector 38mm.If you are going to do the job yourself you would need to drain the system down - if you have a Combi boiler isolate the water at the boiler, if a header tank stop the water filling the tank. As you have pipework running along the skirting I guess you have concrete floors - somewhere on the pipework you will have a drain down point where you can fit a garden hose and run it outside. I would lift and pull the carpet back as you are likely to have some water remaining in the radiator when you break the fittings at the radiator valves - and it will be black! Have someone help you lift the radiator outside - not heavy but to minimise spills/drips onto other carpets. The radiator just lifts off the brackets - lift an inch or so then pull it forward to remove. Then it is a case of just lifting the new radiator onto the existing brackets (which should fit the new rad) and then connecting the inlet/out pipework. Then refill - every radiator in the house will need bleeding!Sounds complicated but it really isn't. Have a look on youtube - there will be many vids to watch. You can buy pipe freezing kits to avoid draining the whole system but I would not recommend these for a first timer - best to have the whole system drained!!



No need to drain the system completely, simply isolate the radiator to be changed by closing both the lock shield and the TRV, water spillage will be reduced and mostly only the water in the radiator in question will be lost, there may of course be some spillage through the valves due to the pressure though.

Moot point though as the OP has stated they wish to change the TRV and lockshield, therefore they will more than likely have to drain system, unless there in a bungalow (like me) and a quick TRV and lock shield change (one at a time) sees not a lot of leakage, depends how quick you are of course

Another vote for the Kudox rads from Screwfix with free TRV and lockshield, size depending of course.
Edited by: "andynicol" 30th Jan
Just be careful that the TRV doesn't leak....
You currently have a single panel, single fin radiator.

If they are older radiators, they will likely be an imperial width, so lining up the old pipe work with the new metric width radiators, would be an issue (you won't be able to). Also because the new radiators you want are thicker (and therefore, protrude further away from the wall) your currently pipework would definitely need adjusting slightly.

If you are not too fussed about ascetics, you could cut off the pipework just below the current radiator lock shield, clean the paint off of the pipe with wire wool and attach a pushfit fitting onto that current (and now clean) copper pipe (you can't attached a push-fit fitting onto a painted pipe).

Then, use plastic piping from the new pushfit fitting to the new lock shield/TRV value that you should be installing.

ther things to note.

You would also need PTFE tape to wrap around the fitting on the lockshield/TRV that goes into the radiator.

you would need to add pipe inserts to the plastic pipe on every end of the plastic pipe and use (I think) a copper olive with the TRV/lock-shield compression joint instead of brass.

I like JG speedfit plastic pipe and fittings/inserts

mrcentralheating are cheap for radiators, however as others have mentioned, the current screwfix special offer (free TRV and lockshield) is very good value.

Infact I just bought 2x these from screwfix myself.

if you know someone with a trade Plumbfix or Electrifix account the radiator said are only about £61 inc VAT
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