Apples convoluted refund process

Avatardeleted5795929
Found 30th MarEdited by:"deleted57959"
I bought an Apple iPhone 6s from Music Magpie, after a few returns and reorders a got a decent mint looking device but suffering from a battery that was at the end of its life.

I knew Apple had reduced its battery replacements to £25.00 + P&P (£32.44 total) and as such I arranged for this to be complete and sent it off to them, after a few days I had it back in my hands with a brand new battery.

Then the very next week someone posted on here about free replacements for 6s models, upon checking online my phone was one of the eligible batteries (the original one).

I contacted Apple and this is where it began..

First off I had to lie on the contact forms as they will not allow to contact them if your phone is out of warranty regardless of the issue, you need to request a one off call.

I managed to arrange a callback, and I explained the eligibility for a free battery and requested a refund, my call was passed to a senior adviser and after about 20 minutes of convincing him that my battery was eligible I then got passed to a manager, whom said he needed to check with another department, he arrange a call back for 3 days later.

3 days later he called me back and said I needed to speak with another department and arranged a callback for the next day.

The next day, the other department called me and spent almost an hour, checking my eligibility and said I needed to speak to the finance department, a call back was arranged for the next day.

The next day the finance called me and said they would need to process a claim and send it to the claims department, this could take up to 10 workings days and they could arrange a call back for 2 working days after that to check it was done.

2 weeks later I got a call from the claims dept saying they needed my bank details to process a refund, and I provided my account number and sort code.. they would call me back in 24 hours to confirm they processed it

The next day I got call to say they were going to process the refund within 7 days and they had to wait a further 7 days before they could do that to make sure I was eligible!

Its been 48 hours since the first 7 day timescale so 9 days in total and today I got an email

"Hi REDACTED,








We’re happy to tell you that your money is on its way.








Amount: 32.44 GBP


Method: Direct Deposit


Case number: REDACTED


Credit memo number: REDACTED








You’ll see this amount credited to your account within 15 days.








Thanks,


Apple"

15 days! for the actual refund.

so in total its going to take 1-2 months to get a refund from start until finish, now I am in no rush, but seriously for a company so big and supposedly streamlined, its the most ridiculous process I ever dealt with.. esp as each call was just them telling me that they were going to do it but they had to wait and wait and wait and then when they think I am eligible someone else needs to do it.
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So you buy an old model phone second hand, and then have the cheek to moan about having to wait for a refund of £30'ish from the original manufacturer?
I'm in no way an apple fan, but can't believe you're moaning about getting a free battery.
18 Comments
My experience with them has been a nightmare in the past. My son had iPhone 6. In store test said battery was faulty and they would replace it free of charge. Went away did backup and took it to a different store explaining diagnostic test from another store will show battery needs replacing FOC. New store said needed to do test again. I wasn't prepared to wait the hours required for the test (quoted me 4 hours). Phoned up AppleCare and explained. They booked appointment for original store for replacement battery. Went tot hat appointment to be told battery out of stock. I said 'that's crazy what did you think I was booked in for?' I asked for replacement phone, they said no way. As a matter of urgency I was told 7 days a new battery would be in stock and I would receive an email when it was. I got that email and travelled back to the store. On inspection of the phone they said it had a slight bend and battery replacement was not possible due to danger with lithium battery. I then created a scene in store stating when original test was done on battery it should have been spotted then. After cordoning off an area to keep me isolated from other customers I calmed down and told manager how many times I had been in an Apple store over the recent weeks. He agreed it was unacceptable and replaced the phone. A complete mare. All told took about 3 weeks for a battery replacement and 4 visits.


Sold the phone within weeks and son now has Android phone.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 30th Mar
So you buy an old model phone second hand, and then have the cheek to moan about having to wait for a refund of £30'ish from the original manufacturer?
I'm in no way an apple fan, but can't believe you're moaning about getting a free battery.
Dyslexic_Dog8 m ago

So you buy an old model phone second hand, and then have the cheek to moan …So you buy an old model phone second hand, and then have the cheek to moan about having to wait for a refund of £30'ish from the original manufacturer?I'm in no way an apple fan, but can't believe you're moaning about getting a free battery.


Ditto.

I mean, you lied on a form and you were well aware you technically were ineligible as the phone was out of warranty then have the cheek to say their refund process was "convoluted".

You should be gratefull you even got a refund.
Edited by: "M0nk3h" 30th Mar
What do you expect from IOI
deleted5795930th Mar

No I shouldn't, maybe you both should learn consumer law. I was completely …No I shouldn't, maybe you both should learn consumer law. I was completely eligible to claim that refund.But you and Dyslexics reply sums up the mentality on here, that some how I should be grateful that Apple replaced my battery for a price and then made me run through a long winded process to claim it back under a replacement program they run. I do not believe for one minute both of you would just let Apple keep your money and thank them


Nobody said you weren't eligible.
deleted5795930th Mar

Er you just did, seems you cant even keep up with your own commentsI quote …Er you just did, seems you cant even keep up with your own commentsI quote you sir as saying"I mean, you lied on a form and you were well aware you technically were ineligible"see that last word there, the one you said, well that means YOU said I werent eligible, blimey keep up eh! |If you are going to troll me on here might as well do it right.


"Er" what are you? A chav?

And if you actually read properly you'd see I was referring to the fact you stated you needed an in-warranty device to even get a call back.

"First off I had to lie on the contact forms as they will not allow to contact them if your phone is out of warranty regardless of the issue, you need to request a one off call.".

I never stated the words "You're ineligible for a refund", did I?

Talk about keeping up eh?
OP, try dealing with Very. You're CS has been superb in comparison. They have called you when they said they would and your refund has been sorted. I don't see the problem.
deleted5795930th Mar

A Chav? its not 2001 and I'm not wearing Burberry.. To err is human.I had …A Chav? its not 2001 and I'm not wearing Burberry.. To err is human.I had to lie to contact them based on their advice to contact them.. see the problem there? and my device was in warranty under Consumer Law.here is quote again from apple"Under consumer laws in the UK, consumers are entitled to a free of charge repair or replacement, discount or refund by the seller, of defective goods or goods which do not conform with the contract of sale. For goods purchased in England or Wales, these rights expire six years from delivery of the goods and for goods purchased in Scotland, these rights expire five years from delivery of the goods. "SOURCE"I never stated the words "You're ineligible for a refund", did I?" - Pedantic much?Again keep up. do not throw comments at me like facts when you clearly do not understand what your talking about.


"To err is human." I'll have what you're taking. What are you going to do next, start using "m8" and let your staffie on me?

"Again keep up. do not throw comments at me like facts when you clearly do not understand what your talking about." Hey I mean you stated this in your post. Nowhere in my post did I mention your in-eligibility for a refund.

Ironic, isn't it? Being pedantic?
deleted5795930th Mar

You do not know what ironic means either..“An Essay on Criticism,” by Ale …You do not know what ironic means either..“An Essay on Criticism,” by Alexander Pope. that is Irony!


Reminds me of the song by Alanis Morissette.
Which was more stressful, dealing with Apple or this thread?
And now you can wait for your bank account to be hijacked....
Actually the battery is normally considered as an accessory and not covered past six months as they are expected to deteriorate with use.

Your actually very lucky to have gotten away with that as Apple didn't have any obligation to you, not sure if they were being kind or just confused as you did indeed buy a battery from them but that could have been counted as a seperate sale as they didn't sell you the phone.

"Under UK consumer law, consumers may choose to have defective goods or goods which do not conform with the contract sale either repaired or replaced free of charge. If a repair or replacement is not possible, would impose a disproportionate burden on the seller, or could not be performed in a reasonable time and without significant inconvenience to the consumer, the consumer may choose either to have the price reduced or to withdraw from the contract by returning the product in exchange for a full refund. A consumer is also entitled to withdraw from the contract by returning the product in exchange for a full refund if the consumer rejects the goods within 30 days or if the product does not conform with the contract after one repair or replacement.. The primary responsibility to provide a remedy is on the seller, which would be Apple if the goods were purchased from the Apple Online Store or an Apple Retail Store. If the goods were purchased from a third party reseller of Apple products, the primary responsibility to provide a remedy will lie with the reseller. For goods purchased in England or Wales, these rights expire six years from delivery of the goods. For goods purchased in Scotland, these rights expire five years from delivery of the goods. A claim under UK consumer law may be made subject to the defect being present at the time of purchase.

Any defect or non-conformity of goods with the contract which becomes apparent within 6 months of delivery are presumed to have existed at the time of delivery. After the expiry of this 6 month period, the burden to prove that the defect or non-conformity of goods with the contract existed on delivery generally shifts to the consumer."
deleted5795931st Mar

It was proved as Apple admitted liability, hence the replacement program


Yes but Apple is the manufacturer not the retailer so they could have told you to sod off back to musicmagpie.
deleted5795931st Mar

Yes but because they held a replacement program they were clearly taking …Yes but because they held a replacement program they were clearly taking responsibility for the fault.. to be fair Apples advice is to contact them and arrange a replacement with them regardless of the date and place of purchase.I did say earlier if apple said no to me then I accept I was willing to pay, well I already did.


Yes but the law states you contact the seller so you're lucky they let you because they could have said well get lost you just bought a battery from us you didn't contact us complaining your iPhone you bought from us isnt functioning properly. Just saying that was very nice of them because they didn't have to accommodate you
M0nk3h18 h, 47 m ago

Ditto.I mean, you lied on a form and you were well aware you technically …Ditto.I mean, you lied on a form and you were well aware you technically were ineligible as the phone was out of warranty then have the cheek to say their refund process was "convoluted".You should be gratefull you even got a refund.


If they give free part replacements for known issues on some models then they do it for all devices affected. It doesn't matter if they're out of warranty or not. They're all eligible if the serial number is among the ones affected by the issue.
I had the rear camera replaced on a 6 Plus that was out of warranty under a replacement program they had.

What happened was OP didn't check that his iPhone qualified for a free battery replacement under one of these programs (you check if the serial number is eligible) in advance and paid for it instead. Totally entitled to a refund in this case.

He had to lie in order to have a call back as they probably do that only if you're calling about a device still under warranty. It has nothing to do with the issue in itself.
Edited by: "hearts22" 31st Mar
hearts2211 m ago

If they give free part replacements for known issues on some models then …If they give free part replacements for known issues on some models then they do it for all devices affected. It doesn't matter if they're out of warranty or not. They're all eligible if the serial number is among the ones affected by the issue.I had the rear camera replaced on a 6 Plus that was out of warranty under a replacement programme they had.What happened was OP didn't check that his iPhone qualified for a free battery replacement under one of these programmes (you check if the serial number is eligible) in advance and paid for it instead. Totally entitled to a refund in this case. He had to lie in order to have a call back as they probably do that only if you're calling about a device still under warranty. It has nothing to do with the issue in itself.


Oh hai there.

Feel free to read through my other comments.

Kthxbai
@Segata-Sanshiro
It has nothing to do with what you said.
OP paid for a battery replacement performed by Apple.

He later found out by checking the recall and replacement programs on Apple website that his device qualified for a free battery replacement.
Apple does this when they recognise a known issue. In this case the battery on some models of this iPhone was recognised as faulty. Apple will replace it for free whether the device is under warranty or not or bought from them, second-hand etc.

OP could have had it replaced for free and was entitled to this free replacement upon checking the serial number (you check on Apple website).
He therefore asked for a refund of the money paid for the replacement performed.
The replacement program is offered by Apple, not retailers, so I didn't understand your comments about OP having to talk to the retailer :/.

I hope it's all clear now.
Edited by: "hearts22" 31st Mar
hearts225 h, 10 m ago

@Segata-Sanshiro It has nothing to do with what you said.OP paid for a …@Segata-Sanshiro It has nothing to do with what you said.OP paid for a battery replacement performed by Apple.He later found out by checking the recall and replacement programs on Apple website that his device qualified for a free battery replacement.Apple does this when they recognise a known issue. In this case the battery on some models of this iPhone was recognised as faulty. Apple will replace it for free whether the device is under warranty or not or bought from them, second-hand etc.OP could have had it replaced for free and was entitled to this free replacement upon checking the serial number (you check on Apple website). He therefore asked for a refund of the money paid for the replacement performed. The replacement program is offered by Apple, not retailers, so I didn't understand your comments about OP having to talk to the retailer :/. I hope it's all clear now.


The consumer rights act that he's stating about things having to be free from defects for six years, states in it that the retailer is responsible, that applies to recalls as well, you contact the retailer you bought it from and not the manufacturer.

Its entirely out of choice that Apple do that, its not actually part of the consumer rights act, they could have told him to return the phone to music magpie instead under the law as that was the retailer he bought it from, then musicmagpie would have had to sort it out with the manufacturer.

Furthermore batteries are not normally covered by the consumer rights act, they are recognised as something that degrades over time, it would be totally unrealistic to expect a battery to have the same capacity after six years so they are normally classed as accessories under the law with a lifespan of 6 to 12 months, he bought a battery from Apple, a accessory the battery he bought isnt faulty and under the law should be fine for a year, the whole phone with faulty battery he bought from musicmagpie,

so under the law as it is, Apple could have told him to contact musicmagpie as they sold him a phone with a faulty battery (known issue), Apple themselves simply sold him a battery a brand new one thats perfectly good. Do you see?
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