Approx cost of complete refurbish of 3 bedroom house

I am looking for advice from experienced people who have done a complete refurbishment. There is a 3 bed house in the market which seems to be reasonably priced but would require work to be done. I was wondering if anyone can suggest roughly how much I would be looking at (considering that I am a medium DIYer, can do laminate flooring, painting, etc.).

Would definitely need to change carpets, strip wallpaper (may be even plaster 1 or 2 rooms walls/ceilings), new kitchen and bathroom suite.

I am not looking for top end equipment or granite etc but decent quality installations. As it will be my residence.

If it helps, the below are the dimensions:

Lounge 10' 7" x 18' 6" (3.23m max x 5.64m)

Kitchen Irregular Shaped Room 10' 7" x 7' 9" (3.23m x 2.36m)

Dining Room 16' 4" extended x 18' 6" (4.98m extended x 5.64m)

Cloakroom

Bedroom One 10' 10" x 11' 9" (3.30m x 3.58m)

Bedroom Two 10' 11" x 10' 5"(3.33m x 3.18m)

Bedroom Three 10' 8" x 5' 10" ( 3.25m x 1.78m)

Bathroom

16 Comments

As of 5 years ago. 3 bed semi in Leeds new windows/doors. Complete re wire (mates rates) and replastering throughout (uncle did upstairs for free and paid a tradesman £200 cash for downstairs) New carpets/ decorating. 10k kitchen/ 3k bathroom, new boiler/ burglar alarm / garage door!! Really nice new fireplace £1300. Can't think of anything else.
£22,000 total (still have jobs to do mainly outside repointing and landscaping)
Really shopped around for everything and negotiated. Not everything was new eg beds and sofa were brought from the previous property.

got to say 22k is unrealistic for today and if you want a good finish. double that at least





jhyt89

got to say 22k is unrealistic for today and if you want a good finish. … got to say 22k is unrealistic for today and if you want a good finish. double that at least



OP doesn't state if he/she is planning on replacing windows/doors, re-wiring or installing new heating system.

<22k is achievable IMO if 'complete refurb' excludes the above.

Original Poster

andynicol

OP doesn't state if he/she is planning on replacing windows/doors, … OP doesn't state if he/she is planning on replacing windows/doors, re-wiring or installing new heating system.<22k is achievable IMO if 'complete refurb' excludes the above.



Some part of the heating system (3 to 4 radiators) maybe but definitely no need for re-wiring or replacing windows/doors.

Edited by: "AstalaVista" 7th Sep 2016

Don't forget fascias and bottom tile felt replacement as this is important if they've rotted. It's all the little bits that cost in the end.

andynicol

OP doesn't state if he/she is planning on replacing windows/doors, … OP doesn't state if he/she is planning on replacing windows/doors, re-wiring or installing new heating system.<22k is achievable IMO if 'complete refurb' excludes the above.



depends on the quality as I say. you could refurb with the cheapest materials and basic finish or the best materials and the best finish. but the range is 20 to 50k.

AstalaVista

Some part of the heating system (3 to 4 radiators) maybe but definitely … Some part of the heating system (3 to 4 radiators) maybe but definitely no need for re-wiring or replacing windows/doors.



3/4 radiators, presuming your system is adequate, could be up to £1k, steep? this could be the best part of a weeks work to a plumber.

carpeting, painting, skirting etc, presuming you'll do these yourself, £750 per room, lounge, 3 beds & dining = £3,750

plasterer, if required, £2-300 per room..??

cloakroom, as lounge and beds, but using leftover paint, carpet etc - £nil

bathroom - £5k plus

kitchen - £8k plus


I'd do most of the DIY myself and would be confident of doing this below £20k





jhyt89

depends on the quality as I say. you could refurb with the cheapest … depends on the quality as I say. you could refurb with the cheapest materials and basic finish or the best materials and the best finish. but the range is 20 to 50k.



Only the kitchen and bathroom would benefit from better quality materials, decent carpets, paint and woodwork need not be top dollar to be decent, no point in using say Farrow & Ball paint, when Dulux at half the price would suffice etc.

Bath & kitchen is where the money should be spent, this is where the better materials would be noticed, and appreciated more IMHO, what that budget is down to the OP to decide, gold taps, at a cost, budget taps, replace within a year, have to find a happy medium which suits the budget.


Carpets and underlay will be approx 800-1200 per room (lounge will be more). Plastering is approx 400-1000 per room assuming all walls and celling.

Adding radiators is a pain as the floor will likely come up (assuming it's suspended and not surface laid) so it takes longer to the plumber. are you replacing rads or fitting new? It's possible the floor will have to be lifted in a few places as rads are often different widths and depths to old ones.

Are you sure the electrics are adequate? If the floor has to come up for the heating, fitting new electrics is a lot easier.

Kitchens don't need to cost a fortune, check ebay\gumtree as people sell off whole kitchens in good conditions, I'd recommend an extra £200 extra to buy a brand new worktop though.

I stripped my last house back to brick and replaced everything over 6 months. Electrics, plumbing and most building work I did with help from family, heating engineer and plasterer was what cost the money. carpets were 1k per room (18.99 per square metre).

You don't have to do it all at once. Live in the house for 6 months before you start doing things as you'll see things in a different way once you are living in it.

My advice is do a plastering course and learn about draining the CH system and refit new rads yourself.
£1k to fit 4 new rads, a weeks work. What are people smoking round here.
Bathroom, depending on relocation of plumbing etc. Fit most of it yourself.
Kitchen, with the exception of gas, again do it yourself.
It all depends on the time you have, skill level and if you can do it while house is empty.
Assuming you fit laminate flooring to a quality you are happy with. Most other jobs you take will be fine.

Oneday77

My advice is do a plastering course and learn about draining the CH … My advice is do a plastering course and learn about draining the CH system and refit new rads yourself. £1k to fit 4 new rads, a weeks work. What are people smoking round here. Bathroom, depending on relocation of plumbing etc. Fit most of it yourself. Kitchen, with the exception of gas, again do it yourself. It all depends on the time you have, skill level and if you can do it while house is empty. Assuming you fit laminate flooring to a quality you are happy with. Most other jobs you take will be fine.



'up to £1k'

'best part of a weeks work' means 3 days+

This is worst case scenario.

andynicol

Only the kitchen and bathroom would benefit from better quality … Only the kitchen and bathroom would benefit from better quality materials, decent carpets, paint and woodwork need not be top dollar to be decent, no point in using say Farrow & Ball paint, when Dulux at half the price would suffice etc.Bath & kitchen is where the money should be spent, this is where the better materials would be noticed, and appreciated more IMHO, what that budget is down to the OP to decide, gold taps, at a cost, budget taps, replace within a year, have to find a happy medium which suits the budget.



not gold taps...but bristan or grohe will command a premium, real wooden floor or laminate will make a difference, experienced carpenters vs cheap lowballers, etc. it all adds up. just speaking from experience.

jhyt89

not gold taps...but bristan or grohe will command a premium, real wooden … not gold taps...but bristan or grohe will command a premium, real wooden floor or laminate will make a difference, experienced carpenters vs cheap lowballers, etc. it all adds up. just speaking from experience.



Of course, point I'm making is that the more the OP does the more he will potentially save, depending on skill level obviously.

Fitting roll end carpets yourself and finishing off the rooms yourself can save a lot of money, whereas the tradesman could/should be used in the bath and kitchen where the extra skill level would be appreciated more.

All budget depending of course, and the other rooms could be finished by tradesman over time to achieve a better finish throughout.

Totally depends on the amount of work your willing to do.
Carpet is cheap depending on what you want.
Stripping wall paper is easy just use a scrapper then either warm water and a rag or wall paper stripper.
Kitchen and bathroom depends on what you want doing like for like replacement it's easily doable. Kitchen units are akin to IKEA furniture then it's just a case of cutting the surface to size and fixing them.
Baths, sinks and toilets are just a case of draining, fitting and sealing.
Plastering is an art, requires a lot of practice to get get good at so probably best to get someone in.

All in all could cost you anything from a couple of grand to tens of thousands depending what finish you want and how much your willing to do.

I did a 2 bed total refurb with all electrics, plumbing, roof, rear 4mx5m rear extension for 50k in 2008. Top fittings inc granite worktops, limestone tiles, oak flooring, underfloor heating etc.

I worked as project manager and sourced all the fixtures and fittings as well as stripping out the house to bare walls before the builders started.

The more you can do then the cheaper or better spec you will get.

Look for end of lines making sure you have enough to complete the job. Trade shows are great to get some bargains.

Asking for a price is the same as 'how long is a piece of string '. But it's always more than you think.


Just in the process of doing up a 3 bed house now (solid wall so frame built with 75mm celotex). But apart from the new boiler and final skim I have done all of it myself.

Tip 1: If possible do plumbing and electrical work before moving in. Trying to rip up floors while you are moved in is a pain.

Tip 2: Think about how you want it. I knocked the wall out between the kitchen and lounge then while taking a rest (sitting on my toolbox) realised then the noise from the fridge and the boiler would annoy me if I wanted to sit in the lounge and read. So ended up splashing out on a set of oak tri-fold doors that I hadn't budgeted for. But glad I did.

Once all finished will probably spend about £12k (Boiler £1400, skim £1600, £9K on materials (but would have been less without the tri-fold doors and replacing the lounge window with French doors))
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