Arsenic in rice

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Found 17th AprEdited by:"OllieSt"
Does anyone bother to soak RICE in water overnight? Apparently it reduces levels by 80%


Should you be concerned?
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No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at work!
Dyslexic_Dog27 m ago

No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at …No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at work!


To make sure your arsenick is clean?
Edited by: "deeky" 17th Apr
41 Comments
No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at work!
Dyslexic_Dog27 m ago

No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at …No, but I do lay in the bath for thirty minutes or so after a hard day at work!


To make sure your arsenick is clean?
Edited by: "deeky" 17th Apr
I just give my rice a good rinse in cold water.
OllieSt4 m ago

You've kind of anticipated my next postSuddenly I've got bad vibes about …You've kind of anticipated my next postSuddenly I've got bad vibes about toilets


You should post the deal. Looks a classy bit of kit

'Unaffected by external environment free you from water-consuming phantom flush.'

I can't honestly say that's ever been an issue for me
Edited by: "deeky" 17th Apr
When making a risotto or stir fry with rice I cook it, empty it in a strainer and pour boiling water over it. Never done any different and I've never poisoned anyone as far as I know.
Always rinse your rice before cooking
Think of the Asian and Far East cultures who eat rice on a almost daily basis - they dont seem to have a problem with arsenic poisoning so I would just eat rice as normal and not worry.
I always wash my rice before cooking and rinse a few times , and then rinse with boiling water once it's cooked . Nothing to do with arsenic , but someone once told me that rice has one of the highest allowable number of insect body parts in a food item and it sort of made me do extra rinsing
.
For last roughly 10 yrs I’ve always soaked my rice for about half an hour to an hour before cooking it, then rinse it. Makes it fluffier (less claggy) and so much quicker to cook too.

I doubt you can really keep water germ free overnight..
googley25 h, 22 m ago

Think of the Asian and Far East cultures who eat rice on a almost daily …Think of the Asian and Far East cultures who eat rice on a almost daily basis - they dont seem to have a problem with arsenic poisoning so I would just eat rice as normal and not worry.


who knows eh, they may wash the rice before cooking it?
Arsenic actually exists in soil, small amounts can get into food, though in general these levels are so low that they're not a cause for concern.

I also remember the issue with rice being covered on the BBC's Trust Me, I'm A Doctor and also mentioned that there's an easy solution to this. This is the bit I remember the most.

It also appears almost the same as the point Ollie started with, cutting arsenic levels by 80%

The best technique to reduce arsenic in rice is to soak it overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio.

That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two parts water to one part rice and letting all the water soak in. Using lots of water - the 5:1 ratio - without pre-soaking also reduced arsenic levels, but not by as much as the pre-soaking levels.

Though it does also mention: it dose depend - the more you eat, the higher your risk is.

I don't eat that much rice myself, only occasionally, so no I don't bother to soak it.

bbc.co.uk/news/health-38910848
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
LemonHead47 m ago

Arsenic actually exists in soil, small amounts can get into food, though …Arsenic actually exists in soil, small amounts can get into food, though in general these levels are so low that they're not a cause for concern.I also remember the issue with rice being covered on the BBC's Trust Me, I'm A Doctor and also mentioned that there's an easy solution to this. This is the bit I remember the most. It also appears almost the same as the point Ollie started with, cutting arsenic levels by 80%The best technique to reduce arsenic in rice is to soak it overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio.That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two parts water to one part rice and letting all the water soak in. Using lots of water - the 5:1 ratio - without pre-soaking also reduced arsenic levels, but not by as much as the pre-soaking levels.Though it does also mention: it dose dependent - the more you eat, the higher your risk is. I don't eat that much rice myself, only occasionally, so no I don't bother to soak it.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38910848



Google "arsenic in soil pesticides cotton fields rice"; arsenic is put in the soil mainly.
For rice with much lower arsenic, I wouldn't soak in water before cooking.
wash any veg and grain grown in or on the ground, there may be pesticide residuals and other dirt;
when one eats out, it is indeterminate as to whether they wash or not all food ingredients, hands, dirt...
tinkerbellian4 h, 50 m ago

I always wash my rice before cooking and rinse a few times , and then …I always wash my rice before cooking and rinse a few times , and then rinse with boiling water once it's cooked . Nothing to do with arsenic , but someone once told me that rice has one of the highest allowable number of insect body parts in a food item and it sort of made me do extra rinsing .


Added protein
Meeko3 h, 9 m ago

For last roughly 10 yrs I’ve always soaked my rice for about half an hour t …For last roughly 10 yrs I’ve always soaked my rice for about half an hour to an hour before cooking it, then rinse it. Makes it fluffier (less claggy) and so much quicker to cook too. I doubt you can really keep water germ free overnight..


Germ free isn’t a problem. You would be boiling it, killing all bacteria.
The problem here is Rice grows in paddy fields that are constantly full of water. This leeches arsenic out the ground, making it easier to be absorbed into the rice.
splender18 m ago

Google "arsenic in soil pesticides cotton fields rice"; arsenic is put in …Google "arsenic in soil pesticides cotton fields rice"; arsenic is put in the soil mainly. For rice with much lower arsenic, I wouldn't soak in water before cooking.


Are we talking websites that confirm our assumptions? I'm not a fan to be honest. It's not that difficult to find stuff on the internet that does confirm our assumptions.

And let's not forget that arsenic also occurs in various organic forms in the environment.

Also, the main reason why there's a high amount of arsenic in rice is because it's grown under flooded conditions. This makes the arsenic already locked in the soil more readily available, meaning that more can be absorbed into the rice grains.
splender27 m ago

wash any veg and grain grown in or on the ground, there may be pesticide …wash any veg and grain grown in or on the ground, there may be pesticide residuals and other dirt;when one eats out, it is indeterminate as to whether they wash or not all food ingredients, hands, dirt...


You don't need to wash or peel fruit and vegetables that would not ordinarily be peeled before consumption (for example apples) because of pesticide residues, as no assumption is made that such foods are peeled when deciding whether a pesticide can be approved for use or setting a legal limit (maximum residue level, MRL).

Washing, peeling fruit and removing the outer leaves of vegetables may reduce residues of certain pesticides. But some pesticides are systemic, which means they are found within the fruit or vegetable. For some fruits, such as oranges, peeling will usually remove most of the residues that might be present, but small amounts of some residues may still remain in the fruit.

Processing, including cooking, may reduce the level of some pesticides in food. This is because processing may break down the pesticide, or remove the part of the plant that carries the residue.

Though make your own mind up.

food.gov.uk/bus…faq
splender41 m ago

Google "arsenic in soil pesticides cotton fields rice"; arsenic is put in …Google "arsenic in soil pesticides cotton fields rice"; arsenic is put in the soil mainly. For rice with much lower arsenic, I wouldn't soak in water before cooking.


Blogs don't count... Are they reputable sources with studies etc. that you can consult and not vague, completely unproven info?

Always verify the sources are reliable and in most cases the info these scaremongering websites contain are myths that have been debunked already, if one cares to find out...
hearts2224 m ago

Blogs don't count... Are they reputable sources with studies etc. that you …Blogs don't count... Are they reputable sources with studies etc. that you can consult and not vague, completely unproven info?Always verify the sources are reliable and in most cases the info these scaremongering websites contain are myths that have been debunked already, if one cares to find out...


My point exactly (almost). Though I don't want to appear as if I'm attacking splender, people are entitled to their opinions, even if they are misguided. However, that doesn't necessarily mean that they shouldn't be challenged. They do have a right to their opinion (freedom of expression) though equally my right is to challenge that opinion, as well as and vice versa. Though otherwise you are right.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
Yum
LemonHead52 m ago

Are we talking websites that confirm our assumptions? I'm not a fan to be …Are we talking websites that confirm our assumptions? I'm not a fan to be honest. It's not that difficult to find stuff on the internet that does confirm our assumptions.And let's not forget that arsenic also occurs in various organic forms in the environment.Also, the main reason why there's a high amount of arsenic in rice is because it's grown under flooded conditions. This makes the arsenic already locked in the soil more readily available, meaning that more can be absorbed into the rice grains.



hearts2229 m ago

Blogs don't count... Are they reputable sources with studies etc. that you …Blogs don't count... Are they reputable sources with studies etc. that you can consult and not vague, completely unproven info?Always verify the sources are reliable and in most cases the info these scaremongering websites contain are myths that have been debunked already, if one cares to find out...


I did say, anyone may Google (for determining their own answers).

As a starter for ten, Is this authoritative enough ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc…24/
from the US National Library of MedicineNational Institutes of Health
and specifically cotton and rice;


ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc…42/
Edited by: "splender" 18th Apr
splender8 m ago

I did say, anyone may Google (for determining their own answers).As a …I did say, anyone may Google (for determining their own answers).As a starter for ten, Is this authoritative enough https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730524/from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Healthand specifically cotton and rice;https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1892142/


It's a valid point you make actually. After all, and even thinking about it when I was reading the article I posted earlier, this kind of thing did spring to mind.

consequences of arsenic poisoning have been seen most dramatically in Bangladesh, where populations have been exposed to contaminated drinking water.

It did make make me think of the possibilities as you appear to have already pointed out. What was it contaminated with?
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
LemonHead13 m ago

It's a valid point you make actually. After all, and even thinking about …It's a valid point you make actually. After all, and even thinking about it when I was reading the article I posted earlier, this kind of thing did spring to mind. consequences of arsenic poisoning have been seen most dramatically in Bangladesh, where populations have been exposed to contaminated drinking water.It did make make me think of the possibilities as you appear to have already pointed out. What was it contaminated with?



Quite, recently I was wondering why that there is no independent UK consumer or UK government agency sampling 3-MCPD in refined and processed vegatable oils which affect kidneys, male reproductive organs. I am talking about this efsa.europa.eu/en/…110

And there is an absence of publication of test results in the UK of (branded) products sold extensively in the UK. One questions whether it is a good idea to let businesses self-police their labelling and levels of contaminants.
Then when one company does not , then you get the usual PR statement: "Our company has the strictest quality processes..."

So, magarine is total out in our diet for many years, back to butter, we are trying to avoid palm oil too , just a 2018 web site report researchgate.net/pub…try

I am investigating whether to go back to using lard for cooking instead of veggie oils too, as I am not sure yet how refined the supermarket lard is.
Edited by: "splender" 18th Apr
splender21 m ago

Quite, recently I was wondering why that there is no independent UK …Quite, recently I was wondering why that there is no independent UK consumer or UK government agency sampling 3-MCPD in refined and processed vegatable oils which affect kidneys, male reproductive organs. I am talking about this https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/180110And there is an absence of publication of test results in the UK of (branded) products sold extensively in the UK. One questions whether it is a good idea to let businesses self-police their labelling and levels of contaminants.Then when one company does not , then you get the usual PR statement: "Our company has the strictest quality processes..."So, magarine is total out in our diet for many years, back to butter, we are trying to avoid palm oil too , just a 2018 web site report https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312469324_3-MCPD_Esters_A_new_challenge_for_the_palm_oil_industryI am investigating whether to go back to using lard for cooking instead of veggie oils too, as I am not sure yet how refined the supermarket lard is.


I'm erring on the side of caution at the moment though I may try at some point to read the articles you've posted all the same.

Incidentally, and interestingly, I also remember quite some time ago, now that you have mentioned it, reading that cotton uses higher volumes of more toxic pesticides than any other crop.

There are also rumours that the original jeans were made from hemp, a fibre more usually associated with rope and sacks. There is also a dedicated band of devotees who claim that hemp doesn’t need pesticides. Not sure how much that is true though.

What I can say though is don't try smoking hemp jeans as you'll only get nothing but an awful headache.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
We tend to just soak the rice in water for a few hours or so before cooking. Overnight seems... too cautious. Always done it this way, never had food poisioning.
M0nk3h15 m ago

We tend to just soak the rice in water for a few hours or so before …We tend to just soak the rice in water for a few hours or so before cooking. Overnight seems... too cautious. Always done it this way, never had food poisioning.


It does actually mention on the BBC article I posted earlier: Using lots of water without pre-soaking also reduced arsenic levels, but not by as much as the pre-soaking levels.

You could be right about it being too cautious in some ways. But I suppose you're still pre soaking all the same, even though not overnight.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
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splender46 m ago

Quite, recently I was wondering why that there is no independent UK …Quite, recently I was wondering why that there is no independent UK consumer or UK government agency sampling 3-MCPD in refined and processed vegatable oils which affect kidneys, male reproductive organs. I am talking about this https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/180110And there is an absence of publication of test results in the UK of (branded) products sold extensively in the UK. One questions whether it is a good idea to let businesses self-police their labelling and levels of contaminants.Then when one company does not , then you get the usual PR statement: "Our company has the strictest quality processes..."So, magarine is total out in our diet for many years, back to butter, we are trying to avoid palm oil too , just a 2018 web site report https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312469324_3-MCPD_Esters_A_new_challenge_for_the_palm_oil_industryI am investigating whether to go back to using lard for cooking instead of veggie oils too, as I am not sure yet how refined the supermarket lard is.


Without wishing to throw a spanner in the cogs of thought......there is quite a lot of nutritionists out there coming to the conclusion that eliminating all animal fats and refined plant fats/oils is actually preferable.
It might seem extreme to many but increasing numbers of people are following oil free diets these days.
LemonHead3 m ago

It does actually mention on the BBC article I posted earlier: Using lots …It does actually mention on the BBC article I posted earlier: Using lots of water without pre-soaking also reduced arsenic levels, but not by as much as the pre-soaking levels.You could be right about it being too cautious in some ways.


As long as the rice is fully cooked and piping hot I don't think you'd suffer anything. My 2 pence anyway.
M0nk3h5 m ago

As long as the rice is fully cooked and piping hot I don't think you'd …As long as the rice is fully cooked and piping hot I don't think you'd suffer anything. My 2 pence anyway.


Perhaps. Though I'm sure you'll be alright all the same.

Isn't it my two penn'orth by the way. Damn it, I'm showing my age!
splender1 h, 16 m ago

I did say, anyone may Google (for determining their own answers).As a …I did say, anyone may Google (for determining their own answers).As a starter for ten, Is this authoritative enough https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730524/from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Healthand specifically cotton and rice;https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1892142/


Yep... don't take it like a personal attack.

This is a valid post with an authoritative source cited. I didn't even comment on the actual issue raised because I'm not informed enough.

Anyone could otherwise say this or that and say "google it" or cite some article on a blog etc. I was more criticising a certain way of arguing that some people have online with medical issues or stuff like this.

You're making a point (generic you) so substantiate it with a valid source is my advice. Otherwise I won't take what you're saying seriously and no one else should either.
PrincessJellybean19 m ago

Without wishing to throw a spanner in the cogs of thought......there is …Without wishing to throw a spanner in the cogs of thought......there is quite a lot of nutritionists out there coming to the conclusion that eliminating all animal fats and refined plant fats/oils is actually preferable. It might seem extreme to many but increasing numbers of people are following oil free diets these days.


Doesn't it depend on what fats are good for you/bad for you?

Bad bad fats are saturated and trans fats. Unsaturated fats on the other hand tend to be better for you which include polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Also, both mono and polyunsaturated fats, when eaten in moderation.

Butter is also a good source of Vitamin A as well.

I'm not sure if I've got this right though I think I heard that butter is actually better than olive spread as well. I think it helps you absorb, from what I remember, is it vitamins, I can't remember??
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
hearts2219 m ago

Yep... don't take it like a personal attack. This is a valid post with an …Yep... don't take it like a personal attack. This is a valid post with an authoritative source cited. I didn't even comment on the actual issue raised because I'm not informed enough. Anyone could otherwise say this or that and say "google it" or cite some article on a blog etc. I was more criticising a certain way of arguing that some people have online with medical issues or stuff like this. You're making a point (generic you) so substantiate it with a valid source is my advice. Otherwise I won't take what you're saying seriously and no one else should either.


Completely agree.

The reason why I mentioned the point about personal attacks by the way is because you said if one cares to find out in your original post. Though thinking about it now after reading your last post I suppose it was meant as a generalisation, not a personal attack as a per say.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 18th Apr
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LemonHead28 m ago

Doesn't it depend on what fats are good for you/bad for you?Bad bad fats …Doesn't it depend on what fats are good for you/bad for you?Bad bad fats are saturated and trans fats. Unsaturated fats on the other hand tend to be better for you which include polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Also, both mono and polyunsaturated fats, when eaten in moderation.Butter is also a good source of Vitamin A as well.I'm not sure if I've got this right though I think I heard that butter is actually better than olive spread as well. I think it helps you absorb, from what I remember, is it vitamins, I can't remember??


Certainly some fats and oils are better than others, but there is a school of thought that suggests that all animal fats, and refined plant fats are bad; because esentially oil production is striping the nutrition away from the original product leaving a calorie dense, low nutrient food. This oil when consumed, then impairs things like arterial and endothelial function.
I'm not advising anyone one way or the other; although I'm oil free myself, we all have different dietary criteria but it's certainly another one of those things that's out there to befuddle us all when thinking what to put in our shopping trolleys.
PrincessJellybean18 m ago

Certainly some fats and oils are better than others, but there is a school …Certainly some fats and oils are better than others, but there is a school of thought that suggests that all animal fats, and refined plant fats are bad; because esentially oil production is striping the nutrition away from the original product leaving a calorie dense, low nutrient food. This oil when consumed, then impairs things like arterial and endothelial function.I'm not advising anyone one way or the other; although I'm oil free myself, we all have different dietary criteria but it's certainly another one of those things that's out there to befuddle us all when thinking what to put in our shopping trolleys.


Like hearts22 I would want to see the evidence before committing to this. Though I will take your word for it for now.

Incidentally, any person may call themselves a nutritionist/nutrition expert even if they are wholly self-taught. "Nutritionist" isn't a protected term in the UK, unlike "dietitian"

mstrust.org.uk/a-z…ian
LemonHead3 h, 5 m ago

You don't need to wash or peel fruit and vegetables that would not …You don't need to wash or peel fruit and vegetables that would not ordinarily be peeled before consumption (for example apples) because of pesticide residues, as no assumption is made that such foods are peeled when deciding whether a pesticide can be approved for use or setting a legal limit (maximum residue level, MRL).Washing, peeling fruit and removing the outer leaves of vegetables may reduce residues of certain pesticides. But some pesticides are systemic, which means they are found within the fruit or vegetable. For some fruits, such as oranges, peeling will usually remove most of the residues that might be present, but small amounts of some residues may still remain in the fruit.Processing, including cooking, may reduce the level of some pesticides in food. This is because processing may break down the pesticide, or remove the part of the plant that carries the residue.Though make your own mind up.https://www.food.gov.uk/business-industry/farmingfood/pesticides/pestfaq


Good points, we wash vegetables and fruits if we eat the skin, which can be nutritious.
Back to rice, we buy Thai rice, rinse three times with tap water, then cook.

In general, although governments publish safe levels of all toxic substances in foods.
I think it also depends on the individual's organs and health as to how well that one copes with these toxins in foods.

One safe way to remove arsenic in body is to sweat it out , ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc…75/
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LemonHead26 m ago

Like hearts22 I would want to see the evidence before committing to this. …Like hearts22 I would want to see the evidence before committing to this. Though I will take your word for it for now.Incidentally, any person may call themselves a nutritionist/nutrition expert even if they are wholly self-taught. "Nutritionist" isn't a protected term in the UK, unlike "dietitian"https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/dietitian


Oh totally, I was only just saying to someone on another thread that anything anyone says on a forum should be thoroughly researched before trusting it when it comes to health. Even if a person provides citations it doesn't necessarily mean what they, or their source is saying is true; there is evidence to support everything out there these days (lol).
I was really just throwing another train of thought into the mix, when considering fats and oils.
I also get what your saying about nutritionists too, I kinda was being lazy and was referring to those who have studied nutrition in general, but you are correct in what you say about self proclaimed nutritionists, indeed I have a friend who gave himself this title a good while before he was actually qualified to wield it safely, thankfully he knows his stuff now (nerd).
I don't think enough people think about what they eat, so it's good to see people taking the time to research these kinds of things
There is a lot of fake or semi faked science about food and various medicinal properties of stuff. It is big money business that's driving much of the health and nutritional claims. So one needs to reference credible citations often.
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