asbestos garage roofs

19
Posted 15th Feb
Hi I wanted to know a good and safe way to cover the hole in the garage roof which on the outside has asbestos tiles/sheets.

If I were to use evaporative foam and a small amount of black roof felt would this work for a few years?
Community Updates
Ask

Groups

19 Comments
Following this thread too! We moved into this property a few weeks ago and our garage asbestos roof has some small cracks too. I've seen you can get some repair kits but for what they do it seems expensive.

We have a few splits in ours (maybe 5) and our builder suggested it would be cheaper to remove the sheets and pay to take them to a local recycling centre rather than pay for an asbestos skip and just replace the roof.
I took the old asbestos sheets off the old garage myself, wrapped in plastic sheeting, taped all sides of sheeting, took to local tip that has a large storage bin for this type of thing, they opened this bin and helped me put it in. All at no extra cost.
Edited by: "darkovo" 15th Feb
First, asbestos? How old is the property? Asbestos was totally banned in 1999, if it was built before then be very careful. Don't damage it or cut it, perhaps get some advice first.
If it was built after 2000 I would recommend using a bitumen sealant and a silicon sheet (if it's not to big it won't cost a lot and will be weather resistant. Foam can let water through, as I have found to my dismay ( I used foam to seal a hole in a fibrous, not asbestos, roof. Cleaned the area first. Let it dry for several hours in the sun. Used loads and some roofing felt. Was so proud till it rained. )
I used a silicon baking sheet from the kitchen (wife wasn't happy )and some bitumen sealant. That worked fine.
We can take asbestos to local tip. Information on council website. If you can do the same then replace roof with sheets or roofing of some kind. Get rides of the nasty stuff
Edited by: "wayners" 15th Feb
i can't comment on how to fix the roof but you shouldn't disturb the asbestos sheets as when they break or should they do, the asbestos fibre inside can be harmful when released into the air.

asbestos roof sheets are the lower grade of harmful for asbestos materials but if you can afford to get them replaced, it is best to do so rather than do any repairs to them.

hubby got ours removed and replaced last year when we sold our house for £3,500 but that was a double length garage so if your garage is standard size then it would be cheaper than this.
Our council tips do not accept asbestos, I disposed of a couple of half buried corrugated sheets when replacing the fencing, had to wrap it up in plastic and ring the council to collect them, I think there was a small fee, and also a strict limit on the number of sheets they would collect, I think it was something like a max of only 3 or 4 sheets in a 2 year period.

If I had an asbestos roofed garage, I'd get it professionally removed, I know it is expensive, but the damage even a tiny amount of asbestos dust does to your lungs and health is huge.
Too much scaremongering on asbestos I believe, let's NOT forget that it is still used in 4 country's and its mined so there is asbestos in the water supply too. The great asbestos scam springs to mind, I'm not saying that it's not dangerous but definitely overhyped
cliosport6515/02/2020 13:19

Too much scaremongering on asbestos I believe, let's NOT forget that it is …Too much scaremongering on asbestos I believe, let's NOT forget that it is still used in 4 country's and its mined so there is asbestos in the water supply too. The great asbestos scam springs to mind, I'm not saying that it's not dangerous but definitely overhyped


agreed

definitely best to be safe of course, but tobacco can be just as cancerous but you don't see people putting respirators on when walking past someone smoking...
adamspencer9515/02/2020 13:28

agreeddefinitely best to be safe of course, but tobacco can be just as …agreeddefinitely best to be safe of course, but tobacco can be just as cancerous but you don't see people putting respirators on when walking past someone smoking...


I think as time goes on LED lights would have been bad for your eyes and that will come out in 20 odd years
adamspencer9515/02/2020 13:28

agreeddefinitely best to be safe of course, but tobacco can be just as …agreeddefinitely best to be safe of course, but tobacco can be just as cancerous but you don't see people putting respirators on when walking past someone smoking...



Don't be daft, there is no safe exposure level to Asbestos, it sits in your lungs and can harm or kill you 20 or 30 years later even if you are not exposed again.
melted15/02/2020 14:26

Don't be daft, there is no safe exposure level to Asbestos, it sits in …Don't be daft, there is no safe exposure level to Asbestos, it sits in your lungs and can harm or kill you 20 or 30 years later even if you are not exposed again.


there is no safe limit for tobacco either and the damage to cells lingers

same principle
melted15/02/2020 14:26

Don't be daft, there is no safe exposure level to Asbestos, it sits in …Don't be daft, there is no safe exposure level to Asbestos, it sits in your lungs and can harm or kill you 20 or 30 years later even if you are not exposed again.


How about this as a thought, if a house catches fire that contains asbestos it will also make it airborne, something no one has control over, then what
cliosport6515/02/2020 15:09

How about this as a thought, if a house catches fire that contains …How about this as a thought, if a house catches fire that contains asbestos it will also make it airborne, something no one has control over, then what


Anybody that inhales the dust is at risk of developing asbestosis, nothing that can be done, that doesn't make it the slightest bit advisable to deliberately expose yourself to it.

I remember some years ago there was the suggestion that there could be legislation to make people have any asbestos used in their buildings removed at their own cost, nothing came of it in the end, possibly because removing it would cause more exposure to the harmful dust than leaving solid asbestos well alone. Would have affected us as there's asbestos in the ceiling artex and sofit boards and expansion tank.
Edited by: "melted" 15th Feb
melted15/02/2020 15:51

Anybody that inhales the dust is at risk of developing asbestosis, nothing …Anybody that inhales the dust is at risk of developing asbestosis, nothing that can be done, that doesn't make it the slightest bit advisable to deliberately expose yourself to it. I remember some years ago there was the suggestion that there could be legislation to make people have any asbestos used in their buildings removed at their own cost, nothing came of it in the end, possibly because removing it would cause more exposure to the harmful dust than leaving solid asbestos well alone. Would have affected us as there's asbestos in the ceiling artex and sofit boards and expansion tank.


Not quite asbestosis is usually caused from a long term exposure to it. No one has said to break it up and be careless with it , but the stuff is everywhere no getting away from it and just the word asbestos is enough to scare people.
cliosport6515/02/2020 15:55

Not quite asbestosis is usually caused from a long term exposure to it. No …Not quite asbestosis is usually caused from a long term exposure to it. No one has said to break it up and be careless with it , but the stuff is everywhere no getting away from it and just the word asbestos is enough to scare people.



Removing nails and screws, general handling, letting it rub against other surfaces etc will all create dust, which is why the pros wear protective clothing, enclose it and spray adhesive on it when they remove it.

The risk does go up proportionally with the amount in your lungs, but a fatal tumour can form around a single fibre.

If you are going to handle the stuff you need training and the correct equipment, and expect to pay a fortune disposing of it yourself, if you do so legally.

My father has been diagnosed as having asbestos caused plaques in his lungs and as one of the causes of his pleural effusions and he's never worked with it and only had very negligible unavoidable exposure to the stuff.
It's low risk white asbestos. Remove bolts/fixings carefully minimising dust release ensuring you wear a dust mask. Wrap in plastic as mentioned before and take to local council skip free of charge.

Replace with an alternative material.
Edited by: "greenyblades" 15th Feb
melted15/02/2020 16:41

Removing nails and screws, general handling, letting it rub against other …Removing nails and screws, general handling, letting it rub against other surfaces etc will all create dust, which is why the pros wear protective clothing, enclose it and spray adhesive on it when they remove it. The risk does go up proportionally with the amount in your lungs, but a fatal tumour can form around a single fibre.If you are going to handle the stuff you need training and the correct equipment, and expect to pay a fortune disposing of it yourself, if you do so legally.My father has been diagnosed as having asbestos caused plaques in his lungs and as one of the causes of his pleural effusions and he's never worked with it and only had very negligible unavoidable exposure to the stuff.


Unfortunately the stuff is everywhere still and will be forever, as I said before 4 country's still use it. There is no getting away from it, its in the air daily.
melted15/02/2020 15:51

Anybody that inhales the dust is at risk of developing asbestosis, nothing …Anybody that inhales the dust is at risk of developing asbestosis, nothing that can be done, that doesn't make it the slightest bit advisable to deliberately expose yourself to it. I remember some years ago there was the suggestion that there could be legislation to make people have any asbestos used in their buildings removed at their own cost, nothing came of it in the end, possibly because removing it would cause more exposure to the harmful dust than leaving solid asbestos well alone. Would have affected us as there's asbestos in the ceiling artex and sofit boards and expansion tank.


everyone will probably inhale asbestos fibres at some point in their life considering there is a background fibre count of somewhere in the region of 0.01f/m^3 of air

and theres absolutely nothing you can do about it


edit
actually much higher
https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/publications/publishing.nsf/Content/asbestos-toc~asbestos-health~asbestos-risk-diseases
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 15th Feb
greenyblades15/02/2020 16:48

It's low risk white asbestos. Remove bolts/fixings carefully minimising …It's low risk white asbestos. Remove bolts/fixings carefully minimising dust release ensuring you wear a dust mask. Wrap in plastic as mentioned before and take to local council skip free of charge.Replace with an alternative material.


Of course safe to be careful. The thing that makes me laugh is they open the container for you up at the dump you put the stuff in, they don't protect anyone else at the dump when opening the containers and the container isn't air tight so when it gets loaded onto the lorry going down the motorway at 50mph the wind is blowing through the container to all the cars behind. How about that for a thought
Edited by: "cliosport65" 15th Feb
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Discussions

    Discussions

    Top Merchants