BAH HUMBUG

17
Found 24th Dec 2017
BAH HUMBUG.
Where did this start?
Is it a Charles dickens thing or what?
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Apparently so, first appeared in a Christmas carol. Rumour has it Dickens didn't like mints and when he was a youngster out trick or treating he was often disappointed to be given humbugs.
Edited by: "bryanhaines399" 24th Dec 2017
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bryanhaines39949 m ago

Apparently so, first appeared in a Christmas carol. Rumour has it Dickens …Apparently so, first appeared in a Christmas carol. Rumour has it Dickens didn't like mints and when he was a youngster out trick or treating he was often disappointed to be given humbugs.


The sweet came after the expression, he could have said bah hogwash
Segata-Sanshiro13 m ago

The sweet came after the expression, he could have said bah hogwash


I thought trick or treat was more of a giveaway that I was being silly.

Edit: just like a post in a now deleted thread where I said Xmas presents originated from a pagan tradition where people would present themselves to the sun at the solstice, which was obviously stupid as pagans didn't speak English to have a dual meaning for that word.
Edited by: "bryanhaines399" 24th Dec 2017
@rincewynd6


Although humbug has earlier origins, you can find out in Wiki. But Wiki goes on to explain much more of the other meanings and origins and it fails on expanding how Dickens had used it in his environment and specifically in his book, "A Christmas Carol". I wouldn't refer to its earlier meaning too much as meanings evolve.

"Humbug" as used by Dickens, means an event which is a waste of time, something too silly for someone to spend time on. That work ethic is more important, work all the hours God sends, and one must not let a folly (event is for foolish and senseless behaviour) stop work. You may check this meaning in context by using a Kindle book and search on the word "humbug".
bryanhaines3992 h, 14 m ago

Apparently so, first appeared in a Christmas carol. Rumour has it Dickens …Apparently so, first appeared in a Christmas carol. Rumour has it Dickens didn't like mints and when he was a youngster out trick or treating he was often disappointed to be given humbugs.



bulls.....
Segata-Sanshiro1 h, 24 m ago

The sweet came after the expression, he could have said bah hogwash



Not "hogwash", open up "A Christmas Carol" and seach the word, "humbug" and you will know "hogwash" does not fit into context of the dialogue in the book. (Or you can use PDF version of book.)
Wongy1101 h, 27 m ago

Something like what bryan saidhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humbug



No, not in Wiki, Wiki didn't make it clear how Dickens had used the word.
May I take this opportunity to promote my Freebie deal on HUKD on this book "A Christmas Carol".

It is good to read Dickens because. "One very common theme is poverty. We see this theme in Oliver Twist, Hard Times, and even A Christmas Carol. Dickens was writing during the Industrial Revolution in London and the stark contrast between the wealthy and the poor was more prevalent than ever before. Lower classes worked very long, hard hours in jobs that often physically injured them and paid them very little."

And this is still relevant today as it was then. You will hear many bosses of today do not say, "Bah, Humbug" but they act it out instead in the (digital) economy. The current Industrial Revolution is called Digital Revolution. The industrialisation is called digitalisation (with AI).
Edited by: "splender" 24th Dec 2017
/facepalm
splender9 m ago

No, not in Wiki, Wiki didn't make it clear how Dickens had used the word.



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Merry festive yuletide whatsit splender
Edited by: "Wongy110" 24th Dec 2017
bryanhaines3991 h, 31 m ago

I thought trick or treat was more of a giveaway that I was being silly. …I thought trick or treat was more of a giveaway that I was being silly. Edit: just like a post in a now deleted thread where I said Xmas presents originated from a pagan tradition where people would present themselves to the sun at the solstice, which was obviously stupid as pagans didn't speak English to have a dual meaning for that word.



Wongy1102 m ago

[Image] Merry festive yuletide whatsit splender



You too , be merry.
So if it was before sickens then what does it mean and whence does it come from
splender10 h, 50 m ago

bulls..... Not "hogwash", open up "A Christmas Carol" and seach the word, …bulls..... Not "hogwash", open up "A Christmas Carol" and seach the word, "humbug" and you will know "hogwash" does not fit into context of the dialogue in the book. (Or you can use PDF version of book.)


As most people know the term hogwash originated from when pigs were taken to Smithfield Market; covered in filth as they were, young boys were hired to wash them down. The waste was collected in buckets and had the appearance of soup, so those same enterprising boys would sell the "soup" to tourists, and thus the name for something which wasn't authentic became known as hogwash.
bryanhaines3992 h, 8 m ago

As most people know the term hogwash originated from when pigs were taken …As most people know the term hogwash originated from when pigs were taken to Smithfield Market; covered in filth as they were, young boys were hired to wash them down. The waste was collected in buckets and had the appearance of soup, so those same enterprising boys would sell the "soup" to tourists, and thus the name for something which wasn't authentic became known as hogwash.


Your method of telling pokies comes to mind.
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