Best 40-43” 4K HDR TV for console gaming/pc

7
Found 12th Jun
I’ve been looking at purchasing a cheap 4K HDR tv for the gaming room to use with my consoles and PC.

I’m not fussed at super low response figures etc. Just like my games pretty and as close to 60FPS as they can get.

I’ve found 3 TVs:

Samsung UE40MU6120 £349 most places
LG 43UJ651V £249 via Sky
PANASONIC TX-40EX600B £279 via Sky

The Pani seems to have the better HDR options and the better price compared to the Samsung. But not sure which will give the overall best colours, brightness and quality.

Perhaps some people here know what they are talking about haha.

Cheers.
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7 Comments
Not seen the rest but the panny tx-40ex600b looked very smooth and clear in currys, either that or it was the only one that was setup properly.
I have the Samsung MU6400, 40". Its a VA panel, so the colours are quite nice and you get no light bleed. I use mine for my xbox one s (4k Movies) and my ps4 pro and does the job nicely, reviews seem to prefer the 6400 variant over the 6120 but I'm no expert, just offering my opinion.
Lukester2 h, 2 m ago

I have the Samsung MU6400, 40". Its a VA panel, so the colours are quite …I have the Samsung MU6400, 40". Its a VA panel, so the colours are quite nice and you get no light bleed. I use mine for my xbox one s (4k Movies) and my ps4 pro and does the job nicely, reviews seem to prefer the 6400 variant over the 6120 but I'm no expert, just offering my opinion.


I read that the MU6400 had a wider colour gamut. Which is good for HDR. But then reviews say HDR is disappointing compared to the larger screens. Makes me question whether it’s worth £125 odd more than the Sky Deal. Might try to see if curry’s has any TVs on display with similar spec.
kester762 h, 14 m ago

Not seen the rest but the panny tx-40ex600b looked very smooth and clear …Not seen the rest but the panny tx-40ex600b looked very smooth and clear in currys, either that or it was the only one that was setup properly.


This is my favourite so far for value. £279 at Sky. Might try to get Richer Sounds to Price Match.
jayuk6661 h, 51 m ago

I read that the MU6400 had a wider colour gamut. Which is good for HDR. …I read that the MU6400 had a wider colour gamut. Which is good for HDR. But then reviews say HDR is disappointing compared to the larger screens. Makes me question whether it’s worth £125 odd more than the Sky Deal. Might try to see if curry’s has any TVs on display with similar spec.


HDR is a new and expensive technology and like any such technology the low end implementations are always rubbish for the first few years.

If you want to buy in now then you either shell out the money for something higher end or accept you'll get a picture that's much closer to a non-HDR TV than a great HDR TV.

If you need a new TV because the previous one is broken or too small then it may be worth looking at what's available. I'd be waiting another few years for the technology to come down in price if HDR is the only reason you're considering a new one.
EndlessWaves48 m ago

HDR is a new and expensive technology and like any such technology the low …HDR is a new and expensive technology and like any such technology the low end implementations are always rubbish for the first few years. If you want to buy in now then you either shell out the money for something higher end or accept you'll get a picture that's much closer to a non-HDR TV than a great HDR TV.If you need a new TV because the previous one is broken or too small then it may be worth looking at what's available. I'd be waiting another few years for the technology to come down in price if HDR is the only reason you're considering a new one.



I've got to disagree, HDR has been around for a long time on cameras and other devices but hasn't been implemented on TVs due to limits on display technology. The main issue at the moment is no one wants to pay dolby money for dolby vision so they're pushing through with their own technology. At the moment I'm routing for HDR10+ but that might be the new standard.

No company wants to pay licence fees, same thing happened with DIVX on the dvd players.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder so just have a look at the TVs and choose the one you like the most.
HDR in photography is different thing. It's roughly the same idea but implemented differently.

From my understanding photography HDR is essentially bringing out more detail by taking multiple exposures and using clever software processing to make a composite final image. It's does nothing to expand display capabilities.

HDR on TVs is a new set of picture standards that allow creators to specify colours and contrast levels that weren't possible before. The extra detail comes from the brightness and colour range being closer to real life rather than just using the existing one differently.

So an HDR photograph can be viewed on any old display as it's intended, while an HDR video has to be adapted to the TV's capabilities.


I'd say the formats like Dolby Vision, HLG and HDR10 are a minor issue at the moment, and mainly of concern at the top of the range. The differences between their capabilities are tiny in comparison to the differences between different TV's hardware capabilities to produce greater contrast and colour volume.
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