Best price on a 4K 40", 43" TV?

7
Found 26th MayEdited by:"sAmeri"
I'm looking for one, preferably LG. My budget is £300. I've seen some popping up at around £220 but they are long gone. Would be of much help, thanks
Community Updates
Ask
7 Comments
4k on 40" screen for TV applications is kinda pointless as it offers no resolution benefit over 1080p models unless you sit so close to the TV you kneecap yourself on its stand. May have some justifiable use in monitor applications. Almost definitely get more bang per buck via a 1080p set cos perceived picture quality comprises of more factors than simply resolution.
AndyRoyd40 m ago

4k on 40" screen for TV applications is kinda pointless as it offers no …4k on 40" screen for TV applications is kinda pointless as it offers no resolution benefit over 1080p models unless you sit so close to the TV you kneecap yourself on its stand. May have some justifiable use in monitor applications. Almost definitely get more bang per buck via a 1080p set cos perceived picture quality comprises of more factors than simply resolution.

What's the point of making 4K monitors then? I don't quite understand why 27" 4K monitors are being made if the differences are minimal in a 40" TV. Would you say the same things about a 43" TV and that the benefit is minimal? I also expect that because it's got 4K in its name, it would have a few tricks up it's sleeve to make quality better, certainly not worse than a 1080p one.
sAmeri1 h, 36 m ago

What's the point of making 4K monitors then? I don't quite understand why …What's the point of making 4K monitors then? I don't quite understand why 27" 4K monitors are being made if the differences are minimal in a 40" TV. Would you say the same things about a 43" TV and that the benefit is minimal? I also expect that because it's got 4K in its name, it would have a few tricks up it's sleeve to make quality better, certainly not worse than a 1080p one.


Key phrase you may have overlooked was "for TV applications," on the assumption your family do not all sit on a couch 50cm from the TV, unlike monitor applications where one person may sit 50cm from the screen. Yes, even a 43" 4k TV placed at a typical domestic viewing distance offers borderline resolution benefit, unless you have eyesight of an owl. PQ consists of more than resolution: how black is black, black / grey uniformity, input lag, refresh, viewing angle, viewing angle consistency, electronic processing, etc, then there's non-PQ connectivity considerations such as connectivity. A 4k TV may tick all those boxes, but an exceptionally low-end budget 4k TV may struggle to equal or better the overall PQ of a similarly-priced 1080p TV. Of course the value of the 4k badge is priceless to some peeps.
AndyRoyd29 m ago

Key phrase you may have overlooked was "for TV applications," on the …Key phrase you may have overlooked was "for TV applications," on the assumption your family do not all sit on a couch 50cm from the TV, unlike monitor applications where one person may sit 50cm from the screen. Yes, even a 43" 4k TV placed at a typical domestic viewing distance offers borderline resolution benefit, unless you have eyesight of an owl. PQ consists of more than resolution: how black is black, black / grey uniformity, input lag, refresh, viewing angle, viewing angle consistency, electronic processing, etc, then there's non-PQ connectivity considerations such as connectivity. A 4k TV may tick all those boxes, but an exceptionally low-end budget 4k TV may struggle to equal or better the overall PQ of a similarly-priced 1080p TV. Of course the value of the 4k badge is priceless to some peeps.

Interesting. I'm trying to find a TV for my bedroom, I've currently got a 32" 1080p one but was looking to move up to 40-43" since it looks too small for the area it's been put in. It's about a metre viewing distance, though considering what you said and that some 4K TVs struggle to keep up with a 1080p, I will probably have to rethink things. I know having 4K doesn't always mean the difference is going to be massive, but it does hold some value for resale in future and in general, gives it a little bit of a shine.

Another question, I've been seeing some TV's which have the display panel and outer bezels on one level, while the one I have has the bezels coming out a few mm. What are those TVs called with the smooth 1 layer of glass/bezel?
Try google, works for me.
£299 for the 40" Panachronic 600 in deal thread below that also mentions the Panachronic 700B being pricematched by JL for around £350 (so 5yr warranty) hotukdeals.com/dea…309
sAmeri8 h, 44 m ago

What are those TVs called with the smooth 1 layer of glass/bezel?


Ugly.

I don't know if they have a generic name yet, but manufacturers seem to be preferring terms like Frameless.

The main picture quality advantage of 4K TVs is nothing to do with the resolution, it's that manufacturers currently not supporting HDCP 2.2 on Full HD models and thus blocking you from the highest bitrate sources on some services.

Also, as well as monitors being larger in apparent size, they're also used differently. You never see a page of small text on a TV channel. It's all much more natural shapes, often stuff with lots of intrinsic noise like real world video. The benefit of even higher resolution is definitely more noticeable for some uses than others.

Plus FHD has been refined for years on things like scaling up lower resolution like SD channels, the experience isn't there yet for the newer resolution (and possibly the computing power, four times the pixels takes much more of it for the same result).
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants