Best way to buy a car? And suggestions of affordable/reliable models?

27
Posted 22nd Nov
I drive a 63 plate 3-door Hyundai i20 bought in 2014. Very basic, very slow. No frills, no thrills. It is fully paid off so I currently enjoy the idea that I'm only paying running costs - petrol, maintenance and insurance. So far no major issues!

However I'm tired of this car and would like something a little more fancy and with some extras.

I guess my wish list is:
- slightly larger (family sized hatchback e.g. focus/golf sized) as I have a child and tired of having to get him in the back with my current 3 door
- cruise control (a must!) I want to experience not having to keep my foot riding the accelerator for hours on long trips.
- Apple CarPlay/Android Auto/DAB radio would be nice but not essential
- Social media and what my street and office car park is full of pushes me towards German marques, but I have found Hyundai reliable and also hear good stuff about Kia and Honda? Vauxhall look reasonably price but no clue on reliability and I can't help but think there is stigma around that brand
- Budget around £300 per month, I can also put down an initial deposit if required

Any suggestions on good models that meet the above?

Would also appreciate thoughts on best way to buy. Loan then own? Lease? PCP? Whenever I've looked at PCP 'deals' on manufacturer websites they seems like poor value as they seem to want a big fat deposit + a monthly payment whereas lease deals posted here usually have low initial payment and the monthly payment isn't astronomical (admittedly they are probably much cheaper models of car mind). People at work wax lyrical about PCP and how you only pay the deposit once and basically move the 'equity' in the vehicle at trade in to a new one - so only pay the monthly price going forwards. I suppose there is a risk that you won't have any equity if you pick a model that depreciates terribly?

I've thought about going into dealerships and test driving some premium cars (e.g. BMW, Mercedes) to see if I feel if the value is worth it but worried about getting the hard sell!
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I think you answered your own question about the choice of car. Visit your local Audi/VW/BMW/Mini/Merc and try a few after looking at them in the showroom. Your wishlist should be easily achievable on a £300/m budget, plus a small deposit. If you can ignore badge snobbery, try the Kia/Honda range too. IMHO if you are interested in the way a car drives, the German marks are usually a better drive, but not always.
You then come to how you buy it. PCP has been all the rage for a few years mainly due to low interest rates. If you want an expensive car on the drive with minimum effort, it could be the way to go. Of course, the manufacturers love PCP because they make money out of it, so its really important that you understand how it works. There's lots of resource on the net, MoneySavingExpert etc. so you don't go in blind. Understand the 'equity' part as that is what the salesman will use to hook you. But, it is often not the case. My own car at year 3.5 of 4 is in considerable Negative equity. The outstanding finance is considerably more than the value of the car. THis situation is tricky if you want to change cars, as the 'equity' as sold by the salesman is the deposit on your next car. Fortunately, there are ways round this which you can learn about.
Also consider a straight lease for a couple of years, you never own the car, effectively its a long rent, pluses and minuses to this too.
HP or Bank Loan. M&S Bank recently gave me a car loan over 7 years @£263/month for 20k. Being a cash buyer will still get you a good discount sometimes.
Anyway, choose the car first and go from there.
Something like a golf gtd will be awesome. Good family car with 5 doors, 65mpg, £20 tax per year. Look nice and sporty and 0-60 in 7 seconds so pretty nippy.
airbus33022/11/2019 13:47

I think you answered your own question about the choice of car. Visit your …I think you answered your own question about the choice of car. Visit your local Audi/VW/BMW/Mini/Merc and try a few after looking at them in the showroom. Your wishlist should be easily achievable on a £300/m budget, plus a small deposit. If you can ignore badge snobbery, try the Kia/Honda range too. IMHO if you are interested in the way a car drives, the German marks are usually a better drive, but not always.You then come to how you buy it. PCP has been all the rage for a few years mainly due to low interest rates. If you want an expensive car on the drive with minimum effort, it could be the way to go. Of course, the manufacturers love PCP because they make money out of it, so its really important that you understand how it works. There's lots of resource on the net, MoneySavingExpert etc. so you don't go in blind. Understand the 'equity' part as that is what the salesman will use to hook you. But, it is often not the case. My own car at year 3.5 of 4 is in considerable Negative equity. The outstanding finance is considerably more than the value of the car. THis situation is tricky if you want to change cars, as the 'equity' as sold by the salesman is the deposit on your next car. Fortunately, there are ways round this which you can learn about.Also consider a straight lease for a couple of years, you never own the car, effectively its a long rent, pluses and minuses to this too.HP or Bank Loan. M&S Bank recently gave me a car loan over 7 years @£263/month for 20k. Being a cash buyer will still get you a good discount sometimes.Anyway, choose the car first and go from there.


Thank you for the response. I think I may try and get a Merc A Class and VW Golf test drive this weekend if I can simply walk in, chit chat a little and then be offered a test.

I'm not a speed demon and given my limited experience of cars (a battered old 206 and now this i20) I'm not sure I'm one to appreciate difference in drive. As long as suspension doesn't make you feel every bump I think that's fine!

I understand the principle of PCP, but what do you mean about your comments re: equity and how the salesman hooks you? With your own car, could you have predicted the negative equity or was it just bad luck? What are some potential ways around this you refer to?

I assume basic research should be to look at second hand prices of a car comparable to what your car would be end of deal (e.g. 3 years with 30k miles) and compare to the final payment price? Any excess would then be equity?
toonsquirel22/11/2019 13:48

Something like a golf gtd will be awesome. Good family car with 5 doors, …Something like a golf gtd will be awesome. Good family car with 5 doors, 65mpg, £20 tax per year. Look nice and sporty and 0-60 in 7 seconds so pretty nippy.


I assume it is no longer £20 tax a year anymore due to the recent VED changes? unless I get a 66 plate or something second hand.
Cameron9222/11/2019 14:10

Thank you for the response. I think I may try and get a Merc A Class and …Thank you for the response. I think I may try and get a Merc A Class and VW Golf test drive this weekend if I can simply walk in, chit chat a little and then be offered a test.I'm not a speed demon and given my limited experience of cars (a battered old 206 and now this i20) I'm not sure I'm one to appreciate difference in drive. As long as suspension doesn't make you feel every bump I think that's fine!I understand the principle of PCP, but what do you mean about your comments re: equity and how the salesman hooks you? With your own car, could you have predicted the negative equity or was it just bad luck? What are some potential ways around this you refer to? I assume basic research should be to look at second hand prices of a car comparable to what your car would be end of deal (e.g. 3 years with 30k miles) and compare to the final payment price? Any excess would then be equity?


Hi, the premise for a PCP sale is affordability. The pitch often starts with a question of how much per month do you want to pay. The deals are very flexible so the salesman can add/subtract deposit, add subtract dealer contribution and play with the ballon (the large final payment). Usually they will aim to have the Guaranteed Future Value such that the value of the car is slightly more than the finance, hence this is your positive equity and next car deposit. Again the premise is to get you to buy a new car in x amount of years and a sharp dealer will contact you when they think that you might be in the market again and when your car passes into positive equity. Depreciation rates on cars plotted on a graph show a very sharp fall in the first two years, before shallowing out. The rate of repayment is fixed, so is a straight line rather than a curve. At some future point the line crosses the curve when loan and value are equal. While this is quite predictable, odd things happen. Diesels have taken a massive hit as they are now seen as dirty, big depreciation. You may buy a new to market model, which in time proves unpopular to resell, so hitting its future value. You may have to go over the mileage allowance, you may damage the car and have it repaired etc etc.
In my case, I bought a diesel just as the market fell out of love with diesel, I went over mileage for unpredicted reasons and the car market ain't great just at the moment for political reasons. So a perfect storm! Thankfully, on PCP and HP there is something called Voluntary Termination, where once you have paid 50% of the the value of the entire deal (inc. interest charges) you are legally allowed to walk away. The lease company must collect your car and it does not affect your credit rating. Needless to say, the lease companies don't like VT, but it is the law. Brings me onto something else to consider about PCP/PCH, you need to keep the car in good condition. You can get charged for damage beyond wear and tear.
Hope this helps
airbus33022/11/2019 14:52

Hi, the premise for a PCP sale is affordability. The pitch often starts …Hi, the premise for a PCP sale is affordability. The pitch often starts with a question of how much per month do you want to pay. The deals are very flexible so the salesman can add/subtract deposit, add subtract dealer contribution and play with the ballon (the large final payment). Usually they will aim to have the Guaranteed Future Value such that the value of the car is slightly more than the finance, hence this is your positive equity and next car deposit. Again the premise is to get you to buy a new car in x amount of years and a sharp dealer will contact you when they think that you might be in the market again and when your car passes into positive equity. Depreciation rates on cars plotted on a graph show a very sharp fall in the first two years, before shallowing out. The rate of repayment is fixed, so is a straight line rather than a curve. At some future point the line crosses the curve when loan and value are equal. While this is quite predictable, odd things happen. Diesels have taken a massive hit as they are now seen as dirty, big depreciation. You may buy a new to market model, which in time proves unpopular to resell, so hitting its future value. You may have to go over the mileage allowance, you may damage the car and have it repaired etc etc.In my case, I bought a diesel just as the market fell out of love with diesel, I went over mileage for unpredicted reasons and the car market ain't great just at the moment for political reasons. So a perfect storm! Thankfully, on PCP and HP there is something called Voluntary Termination, where once you have paid 50% of the the value of the entire deal (inc. interest charges) you are legally allowed to walk away. The lease company must collect your car and it does not affect your credit rating. Needless to say, the lease companies don't like VT, but it is the law. Brings me onto something else to consider about PCP/PCH, you need to keep the car in good condition. You can get charged for damage beyond wear and tear. Hope this helps


That's really useful thank you.

Sorry to pry a bit further (and no worries if you don't want to share), but with your deal will you hit the voluntary termination point in time? Or are you going to be stung with negative equity at the end of the deal? I assume you either give back the car + cash and are left with nothing or you get a loan to refinance the car and keep it longer?

edit: also out of interest, when looking at second hand cars on the more affordable end of the spectrum (e.g. sub 15k, sub 12k) there are very few diesels around! And those that are seem very expensive compared to petrol alternatives, so not sure I believe the diesel narrative as much as the media makes out. When I was looking around 2015/16 there were plenty of low mileage second hand diesel bargains to be had (vs the cost of similar petrol models)
Edited by: "Cameron92" 22nd Nov
Car reliability is a tricky subject to gauge objectively. Partly because all cars are close in reliability so normal statistical variation and how individual owners treat cars are both big factors. Partly because there just aren't many good data sources out there.

Generally though the indications are that Hyundai/Kia comes in below average for reliability. If you look at the MOT And TUV (German MOT) pass rates for the 2013 Hyundai i20 it's below average:
anusedcar.com/ind…577
good-garage-guide.honestjohn.co.uk/mot…013

So your current ownership should give you some idea of what people mean when they talk about an unreliable brand. You don't say, but it's quite normal if you've had no problems at all.

The only cars likely to be substantial worse as some of the budget asian imports like great wall or maybe ssangyong.

Of course that doesn't mean you won't get a bad car, every brand turns out the occasional stinker that seems to be beset by problems from day one. But there's not much you can do about that except knowing when to cut your losses.
If you are worried about “negative equity” you can just go for a straight contract hire; it moves the residual value risk to the lessor, you may pay a little more in monthly your rental and as long as you keep to the contract mileage / fix damage and maintain the car you can just hand it back - or recontracted for further years - this is how most company car fleets are provisioned
Cameron9222/11/2019 14:55

That's really useful thank you.Sorry to pry a bit further (and no worries …That's really useful thank you.Sorry to pry a bit further (and no worries if you don't want to share), but with your deal will you hit the voluntary termination point in time? Or are you going to be stung with negative equity at the end of the deal? I assume you either give back the car + cash and are left with nothing or you get a loan to refinance the car and keep it longer?edit: also out of interest, when looking at second hand cars on the more affordable end of the spectrum (e.g. sub 15k, sub 12k) there are very few diesels around! And those that are seem very expensive compared to petrol alternatives, so not sure I believe the diesel narrative as much as the media makes out. When I was looking around 2015/16 there were plenty of low mileage second hand diesel bargains to be had (vs the cost of similar petrol models)


How many miles you are doing?
BTW, no one want diesel anymore.
Low miles diesel = problem. Google DFP diesel filter yourself.
Cameron9222/11/2019 14:55

That's really useful thank you.Sorry to pry a bit further (and no worries …That's really useful thank you.Sorry to pry a bit further (and no worries if you don't want to share), but with your deal will you hit the voluntary termination point in time? Or are you going to be stung with negative equity at the end of the deal? I assume you either give back the car + cash and are left with nothing or you get a loan to refinance the car and keep it longer?edit: also out of interest, when looking at second hand cars on the more affordable end of the spectrum (e.g. sub 15k, sub 12k) there are very few diesels around! And those that are seem very expensive compared to petrol alternatives, so not sure I believe the diesel narrative as much as the media makes out. When I was looking around 2015/16 there were plenty of low mileage second hand diesel bargains to be had (vs the cost of similar petrol models)


Hi, no problem.
Had I run the PCP to the end of its 4 year term (BTW I'd never do a 4 year one again on a BMW as it took me outside the 3 year warranty, I looked at changing the car earlier in the year @3yr point, but couldn't do an acceptable deal due to the negative equity) I would have had 3 choices. Pay the balloon and keep the car. (stupid to do this as I would have paid 11k to keep a car worth 9k) or Part Ex against a new car (couldn't do that due no equity) or hand back the car.(Liable for the overmileage, no issue with that). The 4th. Option was to VT the car and buy another. Having put all the options on a spreadsheet. VT saves me 10 months of installments to put towards the new car. Complete no brainer, saved a few thousand.

Regarding 2nd. hand pcp's. I have never done one because they have substantially higher interest rates, however it all comes back to your monthly budget. If there is a particular car you want, but can't put a new car pcp together that you can afford, a nearly new or pre-reg or ex-demo, which has taken a big early depreciation hit, might work out OK, just hold your nose of the APR figure! My local BMW dealer put one of these together for me, but I just couldn't do it. I'd also be very careful over the length of warranty, if you are locked into a finance agreement (until you can VT or it ends) you need the car warranted.
Re. availability of diesels. This is purely a guess, but I think the 66 plate ones were the last to get favourable tax treatment. So, I'd imagine that they are going to be popular. Since then sales figures for diesel has declined, so as they come off fleet hire and leases end they probably will start to command a premium again due scarcity as they still make complete sense for high mileage drivers. As said above you have to buy with care if your diesel has substantially less than average yearly miles due to possible expensive DPF failure. Although so long as you drive the car correctly, they should not be a problem.
Edited by: "airbus330" 22nd Nov
I have a 66 plate Peugeot 5008 1.6 blue Hdi auto euro 6 engine. €30.00 road tax.
I got it pre registered with 8 miles on the clock, paid cash.
As I plan to keep it for 10 years,

I do a lot of short journeys. I know not good.
But not had any issues yet. Will hit 9000 miles on the clock next week.
On a good run on the motorway at 70mph I get 50mpg. Not bad for an auto. 35 plus on local journeys.
I just wish I’d gone for a 150 ps version.
Miss the extra power. But like the mpg.

I know diesel is a dirty word now.

when I went in for the 2nd service the dealer offered more than I had paid for the car.
Shows what demand there is for euro 6 engine cars, for cheap road tax and exception from congestion Charge in most city’s and the diesel parking fee hike and London ulez.
Edited by: "bigwheels" 22nd Nov
airbus33022/11/2019 17:46

Re. availability of diesels. This is purely a guess, but I think the 66 …Re. availability of diesels. This is purely a guess, but I think the 66 plate ones were the last to get favourable tax treatment. So, I'd imagine that they are going to be popular. Since then sales figures for diesel has declined, so as they come off fleet hire and leases end they probably will start to command a premium again due scarcity as they still make complete sense for high mileage drivers. As said above you have to buy with care if your diesel has substantially less than average yearly miles due to possible expensive DPF failure. Although so long as you drive the car correctly, they should not be a problem.


I test drove VW Golf Match Edition 1.5 130 and Mercedes 180 1.3 auto AMG Line Executive yesterday. VW was nicely specced for the list price although bland looking. Merc more luxurious inside and AMG line looks nice but quite a bit more expensive even if I went for a manual. Had never driven an auto before it was nice, but would probably stick with manual.

VW quote looked realistic.
RRP £23,735
Adjustment (discount?) -£2310
RFL and 1st reg £225
Assortment of random additional products (Gap, wheel insurance, scatch stuff, paint/upholstery treatment) £1494 but told these were optional
Total OTR £23,144

Part ex £1700
Deposit (me) £1500
Deposit contribution £2000
Balance to fund £17,944

PCP:
36 x £291.19
GMFV £9,754.20

What are you thoughts on the additional products? - I gather GAP is pretty important in case the car is written off? But the others look like an extra £1100 for things that may not even occur

As balance to fund is £17,944 I don't think I would reach VT point until 31 months. Is this a bad thing?

Autotrader has 3 year old 65/16/66 plates with up to 30k miles of same model listed around £11-12k. Trade in value will be lower. I think the GMFV gives little chance of equity?

Any thoughts appreciated.
If you're looking at VW etc, then have a look at some of the Skoda range too. I've just bought a 1.5 TSI Octavia Estate SE-L its some extras on PCP for £330 a month with 12k miles a year, no deposit and a GMFV of £7200 after 4 years. That also includes the first two services.

I looked the Golf and a couple of other estates, but for what I'm paying and what you get the Skoda was way ahead and it's nice to drive too
PCP is an expensive way of getting a nice car on your drive. Those figures are extortionate too - cupra prices.


OP - get on this link and keep an eye out. Please dont go spending £18 on a basic golf, you can get in a much nicer car for less
Edited by: "jaydeeuk1" 24th Nov
Cakeboy7924/11/2019 09:20

If you're looking at VW etc, then have a look at some of the Skoda range …If you're looking at VW etc, then have a look at some of the Skoda range too. I've just bought a 1.5 TSI Octavia Estate SE-L its some extras on PCP for £330 a month with 12k miles a year, no deposit and a GMFV of £7200 after 4 years. That also includes the first two services.I looked the Golf and a couple of other estates, but for what I'm paying and what you get the Skoda was way ahead and it's nice to drive too


Interesting thought. No trade in? So literally no deposit?
jaydeeuk124/11/2019 09:39

PCP is an expensive way of getting a nice car on your drive. Those figures …PCP is an expensive way of getting a nice car on your drive. Those figures are extortionate too - cupra prices.OP - get on this link and keep an eye out. Please dont go spending £18 on a basic golf, you can get in a much nicer car for less


What link is that sorry I don't see anything
Cameron9224/11/2019 11:07

Interesting thought. No trade in? So literally no deposit?


I came from a company car scheme so had nothing to trade in at all. There was a £2500 deposit contribution from Skoda, but that's it. Technically I've paid 1 month's payment as a deposit and the next payment won't come out until a month after I get the car
Cameron9224/11/2019 09:09

I test drove VW Golf Match Edition 1.5 130 and Mercedes 180 1.3 auto AMG …I test drove VW Golf Match Edition 1.5 130 and Mercedes 180 1.3 auto AMG Line Executive yesterday. VW was nicely specced for the list price although bland looking. Merc more luxurious inside and AMG line looks nice but quite a bit more expensive even if I went for a manual. Had never driven an auto before it was nice, but would probably stick with manual.VW quote looked realistic.RRP £23,735Adjustment (discount?) -£2310RFL and 1st reg £225Assortment of random additional products (Gap, wheel insurance, scatch stuff, paint/upholstery treatment) £1494 but told these were optionalTotal OTR £23,144Part ex £1700Deposit (me) £1500Deposit contribution £2000Balance to fund £17,944PCP:36 x £291.19GMFV £9,754.20What are you thoughts on the additional products? - I gather GAP is pretty important in case the car is written off? But the others look like an extra £1100 for things that may not even occurAs balance to fund is £17,944 I don't think I would reach VT point until 31 months. Is this a bad thing?Autotrader has 3 year old 65/16/66 plates with up to 30k miles of same model listed around £11-12k. Trade in value will be lower. I think the GMFV gives little chance of equity?Any thoughts appreciated.


Hi, Golf is a good choice. The figures you have from the local dealer are probably OKish, there appears to be a VW promo on the Match 130 and 150 atm, there is also some references to Black Friday deals. What I'd do now, is to use these figures to try and get a better deal using sites like CarWow and AutoEbid. These sites allows dealers round the UK to bid against each other to sell you a better deal. I have used it and it works well. You didn't say what the annual miles were on your quote.
Somewhere on the illustrative documents the dealer should have given you for the PCP is a Box called Total AMount Payable. This is the figure that the VT %50 is worked out from. It includes the part ex of your old car, cash deposit, dealer contribution. If you take that figure, divide by 2, then divide that figure by the monthly repayments, that should give you the month that 50% is reached, which will be in the latter third of the agreement usually.
I would ditch all the extras offered by the dealer. GAP is worthwhile, but is usually a LOT cheaper buying online.
As a final last ditch saving, when you have better deals on the table, go back to the local guys and see if they will match, or start throwing in extras like a service plan.
The GFV looks fairly sensible for this model, but as you say little or no equity left, so when asking for competing quotes look for a lower GVF as well as at least monthly repayments the same as the quote you have. Don't forget if you end up at the end of the lease you will have lost the value of your part ex, so might only have equity and dealer contribution to play with for the next car.
(Add Broadspeed to your list of online dealers think they are offering the car 2k cheaper than your quote)
Edited by: "airbus330" 24th Nov
airbus33024/11/2019 13:53

Hi, Golf is a good choice. The figures you have from the local dealer are …Hi, Golf is a good choice. The figures you have from the local dealer are probably OKish, there appears to be a VW promo on the Match 130 and 150 atm, there is also some references to Black Friday deals. What I'd do now, is to use these figures to try and get a better deal using sites like CarWow and AutoEbid. These sites allows dealers round the UK to bid against each other to sell you a better deal. I have used it and it works well. You didn't say what the annual miles were on your quote.Somewhere on the illustrative documents the dealer should have given you for the PCP is a Box called Total AMount Payable. This is the figure that the VT %50 is worked out from. It includes the part ex of your old car, cash deposit, dealer contribution. If you take that figure, divide by 2, then divide that figure by the monthly repayments, that should give you the month that 50% is reached, which will be in the latter third of the agreement usually.I would ditch all the extras offered by the dealer. GAP is worthwhile, but is usually a LOT cheaper buying online. As a final last ditch saving, when you have better deals on the table, go back to the local guys and see if they will match, or start throwing in extras like a service plan.The GFV looks fairly sensible for this model, but as you say little or no equity left, so when asking for competing quotes look for a lower GVF as well as at least monthly repayments the same as the quote you have. Don't forget if you end up at the end of the lease you will have lost the value of your part ex, so might only have equity and dealer contribution to play with for the next car.(Add Broadspeed to your list of online dealers think they are offering the car 2k cheaper than your quote)


I've stuck the golf on Broadspeed and Carwow. Will see what comes back!

I tried a3 and 1 series today. A3 quote seemed very pricey, especially given new model out soon. 1 series is nice but like Mercedes, very pricey.

Also put off by fact golf has a new model out next year that looks quite similar to a class/1 series with dual digital displays and good standard kit. I suspect when a new model is released however the manufacturer is less generous with deposit contribution and dealer less generous with discounts.

I actually also tried a hyundai i30 n-line today. Seems very good value and they are offering a £4k contribution and I think about £2k discount off list, probably reflecting the high depreciation. Hire purchase quote at 4.9% also not bad (also with £4k contribution). Not as nippy or high build quality but still feels a step up from mine and familiar
Cameron9224/11/2019 21:24

I've stuck the golf on Broadspeed and Carwow. Will see what comes back! I …I've stuck the golf on Broadspeed and Carwow. Will see what comes back! I tried a3 and 1 series today. A3 quote seemed very pricey, especially given new model out soon. 1 series is nice but like Mercedes, very pricey. Also put off by fact golf has a new model out next year that looks quite similar to a class/1 series with dual digital displays and good standard kit. I suspect when a new model is released however the manufacturer is less generous with deposit contribution and dealer less generous with discounts. I actually also tried a hyundai i30 n-line today. Seems very good value and they are offering a £4k contribution and I think about £2k discount off list, probably reflecting the high depreciation. Hire purchase quote at 4.9% also not bad (also with £4k contribution). Not as nippy or high build quality but still feels a step up from mine and familiar


Morning, I'd be interested to know how you get on with the bids. You are correct that with a new model coming in there should be some good deals on the runout models. There have been numerous stonking deals on 1 series and 3 series BM's on HUKD this year. Worth noting that the Hyundai has a 5 year comprehensive warranty, so if you go down that route you could consider a 4 year pcp to lower your monthly repayments. The depreciation is only an issue when you are looking at the GFV figure, which should be a lot lower than the premium brand deals. Obviously if as you wrote above, it is an HP deal rather than PCP, you don't have the GFV or the Balloon to worry about and still have the VT option should you need it.
airbus33025/11/2019 08:24

Morning, I'd be interested to know how you get on with the bids. You are …Morning, I'd be interested to know how you get on with the bids. You are correct that with a new model coming in there should be some good deals on the runout models. There have been numerous stonking deals on 1 series and 3 series BM's on HUKD this year. Worth noting that the Hyundai has a 5 year comprehensive warranty, so if you go down that route you could consider a 4 year pcp to lower your monthly repayments. The depreciation is only an issue when you are looking at the GFV figure, which should be a lot lower than the premium brand deals. Obviously if as you wrote above, it is an HP deal rather than PCP, you don't have the GFV or the Balloon to worry about and still have the VT option should you need it.


For Golf 1.5L 130PS 5 Door Match Edition with metallic paint option
Broadspeed - £20,071 including a £199 fee for Broadspeed
Carwow - 2 dealers offering £20,072

My understanding is that both are effectively OTR cash prices. So finance contributions etc would be yet to come. I've not chased up on formal quotes yet. Broadspeed did call and discuss numbers and said PCH lease works out cheaper, think it was around £230 a month I can't remember exactly.

More generally not feeling the Golf given new model out imminently, I struggle to see the discounts offered are enough to compensate. i30 feels like a better value proposition to me given generous discount + £4k deposit contribution and best trade in value for my current car. Looks like I could afford one of the highest trim levels and maybe even an auto for similar OTR to the golf and then still benefit from the higher deposit contributions.

Or just run my car a couple more years.... So much to think about.

Sorry for all the rambling. Nobody in my personal life who will want to hear about all this
Edited by: "Cameron92" 25th Nov
Not rambling! Demonstrating how to get the best deal on a new car! By the sounds of it the money savings and extended warranty on the i30 are more important to you than the badge snobbery of owning a VW. Perfectly reasonable position to take. Perhaps put the I30 onto Carwow and see if something better comes up. As we go into December there will be added pressure on the dealers to sell as they are close to their quarterly target date and Christmas.
airbus33026/11/2019 07:29

Not rambling! Demonstrating how to get the best deal on a new car! By the …Not rambling! Demonstrating how to get the best deal on a new car! By the sounds of it the money savings and extended warranty on the i30 are more important to you than the badge snobbery of owning a VW. Perfectly reasonable position to take. Perhaps put the I30 onto Carwow and see if something better comes up. As we go into December there will be added pressure on the dealers to sell as they are close to their quarterly target date and Christmas.


I put on Carwow. My local dealership was the best price. The sales guy did say they really do give the biggest discounts and somehow recoup some of the hit to profits at month-end from the manufacturer.

I've gone for an i30 1.4T Auto in N-Line+ NAV spec (sporty looks and some nice features like heated seats and wheel, dual zone climate etc) with a choice of metallic paint. Cash price £21,795 (vs £25,320 list) but with £4k contribution effectively I'm getting it for £17,795. New stock of that model not available at dealership but available elsewhere in the UK so apparently could take 10-15 working days until collection. Had to take NAV optional extra to get the colour I wanted without a factory order, but they swallowed the cost of that and charged the same cash price as for regular N Line+. Tried to ask for set of mats thrown in but he refused, saying with the NAV effectively for free he couldn't do any more for me, they are making a loss (don't know how true this is).

They offered the highest value for my trade in (£2k) and I will put an additional £1.5k down and finance the rest. Weighing up between PCP and HP (4.9%). I know a bank loan would be cheaper but I would lose the contribution so figure it works out cheaper to go with them. Once credit rating settles a little in theory I could apply for a bank loan (on MSE they look to be around 3%), get a settlement figure and refinance?
Edited by: "Cameron92" 27th Nov
Cameron9227/11/2019 11:45

I put on Carwow. My local dealership was the best price. The sales guy did …I put on Carwow. My local dealership was the best price. The sales guy did say they really do give the biggest discounts and somehow recoup some of the hit to profits at month-end from the manufacturer.I've gone for an i30 1.4T Auto in N-Line+ NAV spec (sporty looks and some nice features like heated seats and wheel, dual zone climate etc) with a choice of metallic paint. Cash price £21,795 (vs £25,320 list) but with £4k contribution effectively I'm getting it for £17,795. New stock of that model not available at dealership but available elsewhere in the UK so apparently could take 10-15 working days until collection. Had to take NAV optional extra to get the colour I wanted without a factory order, but they swallowed the cost of that and charged the same cash price as for regular N Line+. Tried to ask for set of mats thrown in but he refused, saying with the NAV effectively for free he couldn't do any more for me, they are making a loss (don't know how true this is).They offered the highest value for my trade in (£2k) and I will put an additional £1.5k down and finance the rest. Weighing up between PCP and HP (4.9%). I know a bank loan would be cheaper but I would lose the contribution so figure it works out cheaper to go with them. Once credit rating settles a little in theory I could apply for a bank loan (on MSE they look to be around 3%), get a settlement figure and refinance?


I think you have negotiated a great deal. They probably are making a on paper loss for the car, but it will help them reach their sales targets with Hyundai and that kicks in their dealer bonuses which can be substantial. The NAV was a real win. It might well be worthwhile getting a bank loan to buy out the PCP/HP, just do the Maths. I'm sure you are aware that the PCP amount will show on your credit rating, which might be a factor. Should be a Hot deal on HUKD.
airbus33027/11/2019 13:45

I think you have negotiated a great deal. They probably are making a on …I think you have negotiated a great deal. They probably are making a on paper loss for the car, but it will help them reach their sales targets with Hyundai and that kicks in their dealer bonuses which can be substantial. The NAV was a real win. It might well be worthwhile getting a bank loan to buy out the PCP/HP, just do the Maths. I'm sure you are aware that the PCP amount will show on your credit rating, which might be a factor. Should be a Hot deal on HUKD.


N Line Auto was 16k which I would say is probably the better deal, but I just wanted some of the fancier features so the car would feel more luxury to me, and still a lot cheaper than the best offers I got on Carwow for mid spec Golfs, low spec 1 series and A Class and A3s (all manuals). Golfs and A3s soon to be replaced anyway. i30 was introduced 2017 so think I have a few more years before a new model - maybe a small visual refresh soon, but the car looks nice anyway. The true sporty, 250HP i30 N looks lovely, if i was more of a boy racer I'd probably have got one.

Yeah understand the PCP/HP (both 4.9%) will result in credit check and be on credit file. I assume at some loan places you can probably state that you will be refinancing another loan and they might consider that? Else I'm probably stuck for a year or so before credit rating improves and I can refinance.
Edited by: "Cameron92" 27th Nov
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