Bit of photography advise please

6
Found 5th MayEdited by:"paulj48"
I’ve just bought a Nikon D5300 with the kit VR lense, this is my first ‘proper’ camera.

First on my shopping list is a UV filer, for a few quid more I can get a full set of filters consisting of the following (whatever they are) UV/CPL/FLD/ND2/ND4/ND8

So my question is do I need filters with a digital camera that I’ll be shooting in RAW as can I put the effects on after?.
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Look on groupon or wowcher there’s often local photographers running courses on there. Ideal way to learn.
You don't need any filters on your camera for general use.

A UV filter is only useful to protect the lens (or lens threads) from damage or dust. Nothing else.
Using a CPL for shooting wide angle landscapes is not recommended. You can end up with darker patches of sky, if you "apply" too much.
Use a CPL for cutting down reflections and glare etc. i.e. waterfalls, rivers, cars, windows, things like that.

The only filter I bother to use are Neutral Density filters. But I don't use them that often.
I wouldn't recommend buying cheap filters. They just ruin image quality.

Graduated ND filters are pointless as well. Just bracket your exposures.
My experience is a cpl is a valuable filter for landscapes and is the one filter that cannot be done in post editing.
i also grad nd filters for darkening skies, I don't want to be carrying a tripod and bracketing exposures and blending them all the time.
i use soft grad for general landscape and hard for straight horizons like a seascape.
Youll probably want a 10 stopper if you get into it.
Talkphotography have some good forums.
Edited by: "snoopy18" 5th May
Cheers guys, bought it initially for a family trip to Orlando and Disney but hopefully get into it more when I’m back
Had to look some of those up myself....
UV - The good old Ultraviolet filter, mostly used as a sacrificial lens protection
CPL - Circular polarizer... like sunglasses, except you can rotate to target particular reflection angles - cannot be replicated by any camera or editing feature
FLD - Fluorescent light to daylight … your digital my have a white balance mode for that
NDx - neutral density... used if you want to use a wider aperture or slower exposure than the light levels require (on digital, lowering ISO has the same result)
matth99994 h, 42 m ago

Had to look some of those up myself....UV - The good old Ultraviolet …Had to look some of those up myself....UV - The good old Ultraviolet filter, mostly used as a sacrificial lens protectionCPL - Circular polarizer... like sunglasses, except you can rotate to target particular reflection angles - cannot be replicated by any camera or editing featureFLD - Fluorescent light to daylight … your digital my have a white balance mode for thatNDx - neutral density... used if you want to use a wider aperture or slower exposure than the light levels require (on digital, lowering ISO has the same result)


In bright sunlight if you want to blur water and take a say, 10second exposure then you cannot lower the iso to do that you need an Ndfilter
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