Black seed oil- nutritional benefit?

8
Found 11th Apr
Are there any nutrition gurus out there who know factual benefits of this oil?!

Looking to update all the vitamins and supplements cupboard with as much 'natural' things I can.

Same with Manuka honey, get this or can we stick with ordinary honey?! Saw it on food unwrapped once can't recall outcome
Community Updates
  1. Ask
Groups
  1. Ask
8 Comments
I always have a bottle of black seed in my house.
The list of benefits can be found with a quick google. Worth grabbing some, the taste is vile if you’re ingesting it though!
It's very hard to advise when we don't know details of your health and lifestyle.
The most 'natural' nutrition you will find will come directly from good food. Fruit, Vegetables, Legumes, Wholegrains, Spices, Nuts and Seeds. Eating a good diet I would say should be a prerequisite before considering most supplements.
Supplements should be exactly that.....supplementary. They are not short cuts to good health, and to be honest a lot out there are overhyped and overpriced. That's not to say I dont recommend supplements, but I would say there are other things that should take priority.
What is it that draws you towards black seed oil in particular?
Manuka, schmanuka!!

Yes, real manuka honey is simply honey made from one specific plant – the manuka tree, which is found in New Zealand. And it's also known to have a much higher concentration of a natural antibacterial compound.

However, all honey has natural antibacterial properties.

The antibacterial quality of honey does of course depend on the type of honey and when and how it's harvested. And some kinds of honey may be much more potent than others of course.

The problem with generic honey though could be inconsistency of quality, origin, age and even contents. So difficult to tell if it's as beneficial as you might like, expect.

Did you also know that more jars of manuka honey are being sold in the UK than actually produced?

This could mean UK consumers hoping to take advantage of its apparent healing qualities could be buying bogus jars.

Oh, and by the way, the term "natural" is very ambiguous.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 12th Apr
If your diet is healthily and you don't have any special medical requirements then you shouldn't need any supplements.
Manuka honey is more for putting on wounds then comsuming so I wouldn't use it as a supplement anyway.
joedastudd39 m ago

If your diet is healthily and you don't have any special medical …If your diet is healthily and you don't have any special medical requirements then you shouldn't need any supplements.Manuka honey is more for putting on wounds then comsuming so I wouldn't use it as a supplement anyway.


Yes, the main medical use for manuka honey is on top of a wound, and is generally used for treating minor wounds and burns.

Claims have also been made for peventing and treating cancer, reducing high cholesterol, reducing systemic inflammation, treating diabetes, treating eye, ear, and sinus infections, treating gastrointestinal problems. However, the evidence is limited on whether or not manuka honey is effective for these conditions.

Interestingly, not all studies show that it helps to heal ulcers either as I was first led to believe when I first heard about it. It did sound promising. There is also concern that manuka honey may actually delay healing in people who have ulcers related to diabetes.

There isn't enough evidence anyway to say that honey dressings are more or less effective in the treatment of other wounds including diabetic foot ulcers.

Continuing on from what I said earlier about all honey having antibacterial properties: Another possible benefit of honey is that, unlike antibiotics, it has not been reported to cause development of resistant bacteria. These so-called "superbugs" develop after repeated exposure to common antibiotics which require special antibiotics to treat them. I thought I'd mention this as I thought it was interesting.

And incidentally, there are also possible side effects from taking manuka honey as well, although these are not just unique to manuka honey - allergic reaction, especially in people who are allergic to bees, risk of a rise in blood sugar if taken orally (not good if diabetic), possible interaction with certain blood thinners and seizure drugs if taken by mouth.

Also worth bearing in mind, most of the studies on manuka honey have been with small numbers of patients. More studies are also needed to decide if it is safe and effective for various medical conditions.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 12th Apr
Original Poster
Wow thanks
LemonHead11 h, 22 m ago

Yes, the main medical use for manuka honey is on top of a wound, and is …Yes, the main medical use for manuka honey is on top of a wound, and is generally used for treating minor wounds and burns.Claims have also been made for peventing and treating cancer, reducing high cholesterol, reducing systemic inflammation, treating diabetes, treating eye, ear, and sinus infections, treating gastrointestinal problems. However, the evidence is limited on whether or not manuka honey is effective for these conditions.Interestingly, not all studies show that it helps to heal ulcers either as I was first led to believe when I first heard about it. It did sound promising. There is also concern that manuka honey may actually delay healing in people who have ulcers related to diabetes.There isn't enough evidence anyway to say that honey dressings are more or less effective in the treatment of other wounds including diabetic foot ulcers.Continuing on from what I said earlier about all honey having antibacterial properties: Another possible benefit of honey is that, unlike antibiotics, it has not been reported to cause development of resistant bacteria. These so-called "superbugs" develop after repeated exposure to common antibiotics which require special antibiotics to treat them. I thought I'd mention this as I thought it was interesting.And incidentally, there are also possible side effects from taking manuka honey as well, although these are not just unique to manuka honey - allergic reaction, especially in people who are allergic to bees, risk of a rise in blood sugar if taken orally (not good if diabetic), possible interaction with certain blood thinners and seizure drugs if taken by mouth.Also worth bearing in mind, most of the studies on manuka honey have been with small numbers of patients. More studies are also needed to decide if it is safe and effective for various medical conditions.


Wow thanks LemonHead you really know your stuff (honey)
SCuboid13 h, 36 m ago

Wow thanks Wow thanks LemonHead you really know your stuff (honey)


Yeah, but with the help of WebMD, I don't take all the credit. Probably to much information too. I'd just finished a night shift, my brain was going ten to the dozen that morning coz I was so tired. I occasionally notice after finishing a shift.
Unless specified by a doctor for a specific reason, taking multivitims and suppliments aren't needed at all. You're just making expensive pee/poop.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants