Expired

Bleach to cure autism

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Found 17th Apr 2014
In another mental homeopathy story, it has been recommended that bleach be used as an enema on autistic children.... every 2 hours for 3 days....

Homeopathy is a dangerous, ignorant and barbaric field, but every so often a case like this really takes the biscuit.
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MiscBleach
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Linky

Shortened version contains the links to the original, longer article.
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Edited by: "brilly" 17th Apr 2014
http://i908.photobucket.com/albums/ac282/thewongwing101/post-20061-Yup-Penguin-gif-reddit-Imgur-u9rK_zps33f3555f.gif
not a lot else to say really
An enema is bad enough... A bleach enema..dear god

Maybe the complete eejits advocating this should do a trial run. Even better just make them drink the bleach...fools
Edited by: "sofia_the_last" 17th Apr 2014
brilly

WTF..



This ^
sofia_the_last

An enema is bad enough... A bleach enema..dear godMaybe the complete … An enema is bad enough... A bleach enema..dear godMaybe the complete eejits advocating this should do a trial run. Even better just make them drink the bleach...fools



its the next step on from **** bleaching
Original Poster
sofia_the_last

An enema is bad enough... A bleach enema..dear godMaybe the complete … An enema is bad enough... A bleach enema..dear godMaybe the complete eejits advocating this should do a trial run. Even better just make them drink the bleach...fools



Actually, one of the mothers did. Thought it would help with her arthritis.... Anyway, since the kid was mute, he couldn't even beg her to stop, but instead developed terror when going near the bathroom... the mother said she couldn't figure out why.

She didn't manage to complete the treatment strangely enough.
To be fair, I don't think this is so much a story about homeopathy, more just a paedophile ring using a new method to lure in unsuspecting parents so they can touch up their little boys. As if the ruse needs to be any more transparent than it already is, they've even described themselves as a church.
Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing goes a long way and sooner people accept this idea aswell as society in general accepting then it stop people getting conned into so called therapies that claim to cure autism.
Edited by: "Mum2ConnornCerys" 17th Apr 2014
Mum2ConnornCerys

Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing … Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing goes a long way and sooner people accept this idea aswell as society in general accepting then it stop people getting conned into so called therapies that claim to cure autism.



Autism. It's not like you think.
Sometimes human nature despises me. Who would even think this up and why? And then what idiot would even consider doing it.
Original Poster
fanpages

Autism. It's not like you think.



I didn't think she was too far off the mark tbh. What part did you disagree with FP?
Mum2ConnornCerys

Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing … Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing goes a long way and sooner people accept this idea aswell as society in general accepting then it stop people getting conned into so called therapies that claim to cure autism.

fanpages

Autism. It's not like you think.

jaybear88

I didn't think she was too far off the mark tbh. What part did you … I didn't think she was too far off the mark tbh. What part did you disagree with FP?



I was agreeing. My quote was directed towards those that do not appreciate that individuals on the autistic spectrum are 'normal' & everybody else has a problem.
Original Poster
Mum2ConnornCerys

Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing … Autism cure? Not likely any way to cure it but accepting and managing goes a long way and sooner people accept this idea aswell as society in general accepting then it stop people getting conned into so called therapies that claim to cure autism.

fanpages

Autism. It's not like you think.

jaybear88

I didn't think she was too far off the mark tbh. What part did you … I didn't think she was too far off the mark tbh. What part did you disagree with FP?



Ah, my bad. I agree too; it's a disorder, but with management and understanding from the rest of the community, a large portion of autism sufferers can perform perfectly well in society.
jaybear88

Ah, my bad. I agree too; it's a disorder, but with management and … Ah, my bad. I agree too; it's a disorder, but with management and understanding from the rest of the community, a large portion of autism sufferers can perform perfectly well in society.



Do you think those affected should 'declare' their inclusion on the spectrum in some way? For example, wearing a pin badge, a ribbon badge, a T-Shirt, or something similar?

The general population will treat others with care & tolerance when visually presented in public with obvious learning difficulties, or those that are blind (with a white stick, or guide dog), for example, so do you think if there was a way to show others that an individual does suffer from a neural development disorder then there would be a different level of acceptance?

Some that are "high functioning" & are aware of their condition do learn how to cope to a point. The defence mechanisms are learned over time, but there is not a tactic for coping in every circumstance especially when a scenario is unexpected.

(In the words of Mr [Adrian] Monk: "I have no problem with change. I just don't like to be there when it happens.")

I do appreciate, however, that education for the public is needed for others to fully understand how to treat those on the spectrum rather than just being perceived as "weird" or "odd" or, in fact, "different"?
Original Poster
fanpages

Do you think those affected should 'declare' their inclusion on the … Do you think those affected should 'declare' their inclusion on the spectrum in some way? For example, wearing a pin badge, a ribbon badge, a T-Shirt, or something similar?The general population will treat others with care & tolerance when visually presented in public with obvious learning difficulties, or those that are blind (with a white stick, or guide dog), for example, so do you think if there was a way to show others that an individual does suffer from a neural development disorder then there would be a different level of acceptance?Some that are "high functioning" & are aware of their condition do learn how to cope to a point. The defence mechanisms are learned over time, but there is not a tactic for coping in every circumstance especially when a scenario is unexpected.(In the words of Mr [Adrian] Monk: "I have no problem with change. I just don't like to be there when it happens.")I do appreciate, however, that education for the public is needed for others to fully understand how to treat those on the spectrum rather than just being perceived as "weird" or "odd" or, in fact, "different"?



Interesting POV but I'm not sure it'd be the best course of action. If everyone was intelligent, thoughtful, willing to learn, and understanding, it'd be a great idea and I'd be 100% in agreement, but that's sadly not the case. A ludicrous number of the population stumble and fall at the idea that others have different levels of skin pigment, or different sexual preferences, can you imagine trying to get it through the skulls of those people that some people have a substantially different thought process? While it'd work well for certain environments - I fear that it would result in ostracization for many people.

In the words of George Carlin — 'Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.'

There's also the problem of self-perception. Typically speaking - when someone sees themselves as normal, with an illness, they learn to cope, but when someone is physically identified by the illness, it can be a huge issue (think hair-loss from chemo, wheelchair users etc). When someone's life starts to revolve around the illness, other issues like depression can arise.

I know it's a bit of a side point - but it can also be a dangerous road to go down. Identification of those that are deemed 'different', even if it's done with the best intentions by the present society, doesn't mean that the next generation won't take it down a horrible route. We even had a member on here that used to be enraged by the idea that disabled people would be looked after using 'his' tax money, as they were a drain on society that should be shouldered by their own families. This came with hints that their families should have 'rid' themselves of the burden at birth, so we have to be aware of these elements in our midst.

I know of a couple of people who are autistic (very mild) and you really wouldn't know unless you spent large times with them. Completely right that their coping mechanisms won't always work, but those circumstances are very few and far between, and only a few people will ever see it. 99% of the time, and with 99% of their interactions, they get seen (and more importantly, get to see themselves) as normal. I really don't think it'd be a positive move to take that away from them.

Yes, I understand your reasoning, & really only put the idea "out there" as a discussion point.

We see many examples on a daily basis where the ease of identifying perceived "weaker" individuals opens their traits & characteristics to become the source of amusement for others.

Anonymous

Make something idiot-proof and someone will make a better idiot.



I do not think you would ever get anywhere near 100% "buy-in" to the idea across the community/population until attitudes change on, sadly, many other elements of human nature.

Just looking at some of the responses posted by other members in previous discussion threads at this site should give a guide to the acceptance of those perceived to be different to the norm. However, it also highlights that if a concerned party wants to seek education/guidance they are not aware of more appropriate channels to raise their concerns.

For example (amongst many, many more, but these came to mind immediately):

"Is my two year old clever?" (rbqukrbquk; 4 years, 6 months ago)
"Any SN teachers understand hyperlexia? please help question?" (plumberman01; 3 years, 4 months ago)

I also speak from direct experiences, but in previous threads (not quoted above), when I have opted to share information on these I also find that the non-tolerant contingent of this site turn the discussions into something else entirely.
Original Poster
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Yes, I understand your reasoning, & really only put the idea "out there" … Yes, I understand your reasoning, & really only put the idea "out there" as a discussion point.We see many examples on a daily basis where the ease of identifying perceived "weaker" individuals opens their traits & characteristics to become the source of amusement for others.I do not think you would ever get anywhere near 100% "buy-in" to the idea across the community/population until attitudes change on, sadly, many other elements of human nature.Just looking at some of the responses posted by other members in previous discussion threads at this site should give a guide to the acceptance of those perceived to be different to the norm. However, it also highlights that if a concerned party wants to seek education/guidance they are not aware of more appropriate channels to raise their concerns.For example (amongst many, many more, but these came to mind immediately):"Is my two year old clever?" (rbqukrbquk; 4 years, 6 months ago)"Any SN teachers understand hyperlexia? please help question?" (plumberman01; 3 years, 4 months ago)I also speak from direct experiences, but in previous threads (not quoted above), when I have opted to share information on these I also find that the non-tolerant contingent of this site turn the discussions into something else entirely.



I think I oversimplified your suggestion tbf; I had assumed that you meant we should have autistic people wear an identifier, but on looking back, you're probably more likely to have meant that autistic individuals could opt in (or in the more severe cases, carers could opt in) to wearing it - kind of like the "P" plate for new drivers; simply asking for understanding. I guess I can be quite pessimistic and start to perceive the occasional moron as a typical human being and perhaps our nation is actually capable of behaving respectfully to others, but misc hasn't helped my outlook

I think we're starting to touch on a much larger subject here though; the mental health/education is completely inadequate in the UK. When someone is in need of advice, they are reduced to coming onto a shopping forum for advice and this should not be the case. Every decent sized GP office should include a psychologist, in which we should all have a regular 'check-up'. We hear so much bitching about "benefits fraud" on here - costing the tax payer an estimated £1 billion a year, but depression alone is estimated to cost us £11 billion. I'm veering off-topic, but it's infuriating to know that incompetence in our government allows such injustices to go over-overlooked, and head cases to see homeopathy as a viable alternative to real medicine.
Sorry, yes, I did mean an "opt in" scheme (like the "P" plate comparison).

Concerned parties (such as parents/guardians) could 'tag' their loved ones, for example, when escorting them in public to not 'excuse', but 'explain' the outward behaviour to any casual observer to avoid 'tuts' or rolling of eyes from others.

This already happens, but I suspect the wider population don't know what the 'tagging' refers to or, indeed, how to spot it, so the objective is missed. In reality, those that 'tag' in this manner only identify themselves (& their carers) to each other. A kind of exclusive club (like identification of those that participate in Freemasonry, & other organisations of this nature).

It does help empathise with others though. A problem shared is a problem halved, etc.

Discussion within a "shopping forum" is better than no discussion at all, of course
deleted57959

So much ignorance and im not just talking about the bleaching, im on … So much ignorance and im not just talking about the bleaching, im on about in the comments on here..



Are you going to expand on this, or just let us guess to whom you are referring?
deleted57959

My youngest is 5 he does not speak, and communication therefore is very … My youngest is 5 he does not speak, and communication therefore is very limited, when we go to places like theme parks we have special T Shirts we had printed. that say things like Autism is my super power in fact here it is, (my wife designed them)we find this provokes tolerance for those around, which is fecking disgusting isnt it, that we have to make people aware to get the same treatment as others would get..i generally find those over the age of 50 are far less tolerant and believe my son is just naughty and needs a good smack.my eldest boy is far more aware of his autism and as such nw tells people when he recognises he is being judged.



Awesome T-Shirts haritori. It must be frustrating feeling the need to explain your child's condition to perfect strangers. Some people can be cruel. Even to kids.
Yes, that is the kind of 'tagging' I was referring to.

The "ribbon" being the accepted symbol, but I have seen/bought similar T-shirts in the past.

Is your wife marketing/selling her designs? If not, she should consider it... unless you feel that this makes Jack even more special than he is already

Yes, the connection with somebody just being naughty is probably due to the old(er) generation(s) either not understanding the condition exists or an appreciation of how it presents itself. This is, in majority, through no fault of their own, as in "their day" you just got on with it & didn't discuss such issues. In fact, the days of just labelling somebody as insane & carting them off to the asylum are not so far back in our history! People are still incarcerated due to inadequate diagnosis.

Although I appreciate what your eldest boy is doing, & commend him on this, I am sure you are also suggesting that there are times to do this, & times when you should not. Well done for him taking a stand though!
My family has also taken advantage of the LEGOLAND passes.

More attractions (not just operated by Merlin Entertainments) need to offer similar schemes, I feel.

To be fair, if you had been waiting for up to (or even over) an hour to get on a ride, & you see a family all jump the queue (& the long line of other visitors) then you would probably feel the need to comment as well!
deleted57959

Yes, but Tomm recognising those times himself is another thing, the world … Yes, but Tomm recognising those times himself is another thing, the world is balkc and white as far as he is concerned lol, it can be awkward even dangerous at times.



Dangerous is what I was aiming at with my closing comment above.

If he raises his voice in certain circumstances, albeit for the 'right' intentions, he will put himself (& anybody with him) at risk.
deleted57959

Thanks, we made them because a trip to LegoLand, Jack has no patience, … Thanks, we made them because a trip to LegoLand, Jack has no patience, queuing for rides = complete meltdown, he doesn't understand why he cannot just walk on, employees saw what was happening and gave us some free walk straight on passes for him, it wasnt hundreds just 10 rides where if the queue was huge he could walk straight on.well the comments we got lol....."What makes you so special...""Disgusting he can walk your taking advantage of disability schemes...""He needs a good smack that will sort him out.."as soon as we told them his condition and told them to go take a running jump they all backed down, hence the T shirts, and since we have used them we don't get half the comments any-more, but of course some people still do like to comment.



I've not been to Legoland in a few years but they used to give hand stamps and we would all get on the rides without going in the que and I had a carers pass which was free.
deleted57959

They give you some special tickets now, about 10 per disabled guest, … They give you some special tickets now, about 10 per disabled guest, which fast tracks the disabled visitor and 1 carer. apparantly it was massively taken advantage of by people sharing DLA letters now you need a GP/Specialists letter or SEN.



Ok,I'll keep that in mind should we go again, as I say it was 2009 when I last been to Legoland.
Original Poster
deleted57959

So much ignorance and im not just talking about the bleaching, im on … So much ignorance and im not just talking about the bleaching, im on about in the comments on here..



Sorry Haritori, there was no offence intended and I'd appreciate it if you'd point out any (that I may have caused). I've a couple of autistic spectrum friends, and a young cousin that has been diagnosed with Asperger's, so I'd rather correct any false beliefs I have.
Original Poster
fanpages

Sorry, yes, I did mean an "opt in" scheme (like the "P" plate … Sorry, yes, I did mean an "opt in" scheme (like the "P" plate comparison).Concerned parties (such as parents/guardians) could 'tag' their loved ones, for example, when escorting them in public to not 'excuse', but 'explain' the outward behaviour to any casual observer to avoid 'tuts' or rolling of eyes from others.This already happens, but I suspect the wider population don't know what the 'tagging' refers to or, indeed, how to spot it, so the objective is missed. In reality, those that 'tag' in this manner only identify themselves (& their carers) to each other. A kind of exclusive club (like identification of those that participate in Freemasonry, & other organisations of this nature).It does help empathise with others though. A problem shared is a problem halved, etc.Discussion within a "shopping forum" is better than no discussion at all, of course



I have to admit, the ribbon is quite a new concept to me, and I usually take an interest in this kind of thing - so I agree, it needs to be publicized more.

Again, agreed. A shopping forum is a "better than nothing" scenario, but it's still not going to stop me whining about the lack of mental health education in the country to anyone who will listen
deleted57959

My youngest is 5 he does not speak, and communication therefore is very … My youngest is 5 he does not speak, and communication therefore is very limited, when we go to places like theme parks we have special T Shirts we had printed. that say things like Autism is my super power in fact here it is, (my wife designed them)we find this provokes tolerance for those around, which is fecking disgusting isnt it, that we have to make people aware to get the same treatment as others would get..i generally find those over the age of 50 are far less tolerant and believe my son is just naughty and needs a good smack.my eldest boy is far more aware of his autism and as such nw tells people when he recognises he is being judged.


Seriously those T-Shirts are so cool haritori, they look very professional.

Great designing done by your wife.
I'm not so sure about the "tagging" thing. As a society it would be nice to think that if people saw someone acting "differently" then they would think perhaps they have a condition rather immediately thinking their parents must be bad/tthey need a smack etc.

I think maybe "labelling" people evokes pity. Granted, I've only had experience with people over 16 but it's not a nice thing to see. I've taken large groups of my students out, some have "obvious" learning difficulties and disabilities such as Down's Syndrome, others don't. The different way they are treated by the general public is crazy. Very patronising at times.

But as I say, they're 16+ by the time I meet them
Edited by: "sancho1983" 19th Apr 2014
sancho1983

I'm not so sure about the "tagging" thing. As a society it would be nice … I'm not so sure about the "tagging" thing. As a society it would be nice to think that if people saw someone acting "differently" then they would think perhaps they have a condition rather immediately thinking their parents must be bad/tthey need a smack etc.



Yes, that's the point really.

Society doesn't immediately tolerate those acting differently.
Having a visual indication (as you mentioned in the remainder of your text above) is more obvious to others & a majority of the population will then make allowances.

fanpages

Yes, that's the point really.Society doesn't immediately tolerate those … Yes, that's the point really.Society doesn't immediately tolerate those acting differently.Having a visual indication (as you mentioned in the remainder of your text above) is more obvious to others & a majority of the population will then make allowances.



I understand. I also know many parents who wouldn't like this, it would be quite impractical as it would probably only 'work' if 'everyone' did it.
Sorry to hear about what some people in the thread have to go through.

What I can't understand is why people are so quick to think the worst of others?
sancho1983

I'm not so sure about the "tagging" thing. As a society it would be nice … I'm not so sure about the "tagging" thing. As a society it would be nice to think that if people saw someone acting "differently" then they would think perhaps they have a condition rather immediately thinking their parents must be bad/tthey need a smack etc. I think maybe "labelling" people evokes pity. Granted, I've only had experience with people over 16 but it's not a nice thing to see. I've taken large groups of my students out, some have "obvious" learning difficulties and disabilities such as Down's Syndrome, others don't. The different way they are treated by the general public is crazy. Very patronising at times. But as I say, they're 16+ by the time I meet them



My 5yr old is Autistic if we take her to the shops and she sits in the trolley then staff etc pay no attention to her however if she is particularly tired and acting up then I will use her Major buggy this draws attention to her and some staff go out their way to speak to her, I feel as though they're doing it because they feel they have to for some unknown reason....

However on the other flip side of the coin she has wandered from me a few times and I have followed her within a reasonable distance but unseen to her (to see how far she would go) and the amount of people who just walk on by and don't intervene to see if she's ok or lost etc is frightening as she would go wherever she please without recognising the danger she's putting herself in , so I have consider getting her T-shirt or a bracelet to highlight her disability even though I don't like people reactions to her when she is in her buggy
deleted57959

...and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their … ...and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their autism and it makes up there personality that I fell in love with from the moment they are born, to cure them would be like replacing them


Awww, that's so sweet.
deleted57959

I wish I could get Jack in a supermarket or trolley lol, if we go Tescos … I wish I could get Jack in a supermarket or trolley lol, if we go Tescos he makes a beeline for the toys and that's him until I buy one or drag him out screaming..Sometimes I don't mind a bit of sympathy, I feel for any parent who has a child full stop its hard bloody work, But i have been asked many times if i could cure My boys autism would I?and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their autism and it makes up there personality that I fell in love with from the moment they are born, to cure them would be like replacing them.Maybe thats very selfish of me, but at the same time it would mean i recognise that somethign isnt right, when i have no problem with autism neither do my boys, its the rest of the world that has the problem


Not sure what to say sounds like a bundle of trouble you love
me I have a relative with mental heath problems the hyperlexia thread was a an eye opener
Edited by: "Wongy110" 19th Apr 2014
deleted57959

I wish I could get Jack in a supermarket or trolley lol, if we go Tescos … I wish I could get Jack in a supermarket or trolley lol, if we go Tescos he makes a beeline for the toys and that's him until I buy one or drag him out screaming..Sometimes I don't mind a bit of sympathy, I feel for any parent who has a child full stop its hard bloody work, But i have been asked many times if i could cure My boys autism would I?and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their autism and it makes up there personality that I fell in love with from the moment they are born, to cure them would be like replacing them.Maybe thats very selfish of me, but at the same time it would mean i recognise that somethign isnt right, when i have no problem with autism neither do my boys, its the rest of the world that has the problem



My LO doesn't really bother with toys so I'm fortunate in that department, she has more issues with the sensory side of things so when people approach her she can become overwhelmed and will tell them they're weird, to go away or to shut up, she isn't meaning it to be cheeky she just can't cope with it, I could do with the T-shirts then lol

I love her to pieces quirks and all but if I could change SOME of the effect Autism has on her then I would e.g no sense of danger , it's not that I don't accept her the way she is but I live in constant fear of her coming to harm because she doesn't see the danger in things around her.
deleted57959

...and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their … ...and my answer is always no, they are who they are because of their autism and it makes up there personality that I fell in love with from the moment they are born, to cure them would be like replacing them

Transformers

Awww, that's so sweet.



It puts the Awww... or perhaps Awe, into Autism
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