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Boiler / gas pipe

21
Found 27th Jul
hi all.

Hopefully someone can help.

I had a boiler installed in a upstairs cupboard/ airing cupboard. the gas pipe goes straight outside through the external wall and from there goes to the gas box.

My question is, they have simply made a hole in the external wall and put the gas pipe through it without any seal. I thought you had to seal holes to prevent gas escaping?

I can post pictures later should it be helpful.

thanks as always
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Lol. The gas is inside the pipe. Though sealing with silicone should be to keep out the elements and prevent damage or damp.

If you were preventing gas escaping from the house you'd probably have bigger issues. 💥
Edited by: "Sid.Harper" 27th Jul
21 Comments
Lol. The gas is inside the pipe. Though sealing with silicone should be to keep out the elements and prevent damage or damp.

If you were preventing gas escaping from the house you'd probably have bigger issues. 💥
Edited by: "Sid.Harper" 27th Jul
Yup. Shoddy workmanship that a future buyer/surveyor will note one day and ask 'what else has been bodged?'. Take thee pic to a decent builders merchant and they will give you something to seal the hole. Needs to be flexible as the pipe will expand/contract.

Someone on here may have a suggestion as to what is a good mastic
Its very poor just to run a gas pipe through a brick wall.
Its standard practice to have protection around the pipe - ours has a larger diameter pipe around it (the actual gas pipe is 15mm and it is run through a length of 22mm.

It isnt just sealing against the weather, you dont want the gas pipe rubbing against the brickwork.
Sid.Harper29 m ago

Lol. The gas is inside the pipe. Though sealing with silicone should be to …Lol. The gas is inside the pipe. Though sealing with silicone should be to keep out the elements and prevent damage or damp.If you were preventing gas escaping from the house you'd probably have bigger issues. 💥


If gas was escaping from the boiler or pipe a flow of fresh air into the airing cupboard where the boiler is would make it harder to detect the smell of gas because it's simply escaping outside
Buckbeak008 m ago

If gas was escaping from the boiler or pipe a flow of fresh air into the …If gas was escaping from the boiler or pipe a flow of fresh air into the airing cupboard where the boiler is would make it harder to detect the smell of gas because it's simply escaping outside


You would still smell gas even with a big hole.
ccnp35 m ago

Yup. Shoddy workmanship that a future buyer/surveyor will note one day …Yup. Shoddy workmanship that a future buyer/surveyor will note one day and ask 'what else has been bodged?'. Take thee pic to a decent builders merchant and they will give you something to seal the hole. Needs to be flexible as the pipe will expand/contract. Someone on here may have a suggestion as to what is a good mastic


Many thanks
mas9930 m ago

Its very poor just to run a gas pipe through a brick wall. Its standard …Its very poor just to run a gas pipe through a brick wall. Its standard practice to have protection around the pipe - ours has a larger diameter pipe around it (the actual gas pipe is 15mm and it is run through a length of 22mm. It isnt just sealing against the weather, you dont want the gas pipe rubbing against the brickwork.


Interesting so you don't actually have any sealant just another larger pipe around the gas pipe preventing rubbing rather than air flow, weather etc?
123thisisme10 m ago

You would still smell gas even with a big hole.



okay I see your point, only reason why I'm brining this up is this;

Part D - INSTALLATION PIPEWORK

Enclosed pipes19.—(1) No person shall install any part of any installation pipework in a wall or a floor or standing of solid construction unless it is so constructed and installed as to be protected against failure caused by the movement of the wall, the floor or the standing as the case may be.

(2) No person shall install any installation pipework so as to pass through a wall or a floor or standing of solid construction (whether or not it contains any cavity) from one side to the other unless—

(a)any part of the pipe within such wall, floor or standing as the case may be takes the shortest practicable route; and

(b)adequate means are provided to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any escape of gas from the pipework passing through the wall, floor or standing from entering any cavity in the wall, floor or standing.
mas9943 m ago

Its very poor just to run a gas pipe through a brick wall. Its standard …Its very poor just to run a gas pipe through a brick wall. Its standard practice to have protection around the pipe - ours has a larger diameter pipe around it (the actual gas pipe is 15mm and it is run through a length of 22mm. It isnt just sealing against the weather, you dont want the gas pipe rubbing against the brickwork.


I doubt that the pipe will move at all, so how will it rub against the bricks? My flat is from the 60's and the pipe goes straight through the bricks, no problems.
Bigfootpete6 m ago

I doubt that the pipe will move at all, so how will it rub against the …I doubt that the pipe will move at all, so how will it rub against the bricks? My flat is from the 60's and the pipe goes straight through the bricks, no problems.



you probably are correct that nothing would go wrong but see my extract from current Uk legislation (one post above) highlighted in bold saying it should be sealed
Bigfootpete8 m ago

I doubt that the pipe will move at all, so how will it rub against the …I doubt that the pipe will move at all, so how will it rub against the bricks? My flat is from the 60's and the pipe goes straight through the bricks, no problems.



See the post above yours - 1st clause
Buckbeak0025 m ago

(b)adequate means are provided to prevent,... any escape of gas from the …(b)adequate means are provided to prevent,... any escape of gas from the pipework ...from entering any cavity in the wall, floor or standing.


Edited your comment to make the clause clearer. What causes explosions is when gas is able to build up in an enclosed space. So if you seal the pipework through a cavity wall on the inside and outside then any leak will fill the cavity and you'll have no chance of detecting it.
mas997 m ago

Edited your comment to make the clause clearer. What causes explosions …Edited your comment to make the clause clearer. What causes explosions is when gas is able to build up in an enclosed space. So if you seal the pipework through a cavity wall on the inside and outside then any leak will fill the cavity and you'll have no chance of detecting it.


So you think sealing pipework through a cavity wall is wrong and it should be able to flow freely to the outside ?
Buckbeak0033 m ago

you probably are correct that nothing would go wrong but see my extract …you probably are correct that nothing would go wrong but see my extract from current Uk legislation (one post above) highlighted in bold saying it should be sealed


But it doesn't say it should be sealed, it say "(b)adequate means are provided to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any escape of gas from the pipework passing through the wall," which means the pipe itself should be protected to stop it leaking (where it passes through the wall).
Buckbeak0052 m ago

So you think sealing pipework through a cavity wall is wrong and it should …So you think sealing pipework through a cavity wall is wrong and it should be able to flow freely to the outside ?


Basically, yes.

As I've said, I think its poor practice to just have an unprotected pipe through the wall, but if you seal the ends any leak will fill the cavity.

Lets be honest though - in all probability your install will be fine and I'm sure there are lots of installs like that around the country.

I'm not a gas safe person though. If you're worried then find a phone number for gas-safe and ring them for advice.
mas998 m ago

Basically, yes.As I've said, I think its poor practice to just have an …Basically, yes.As I've said, I think its poor practice to just have an unprotected pipe through the wall, but if you seal the ends any leak will fill the cavity.Lets be honest though - in all probability your install will be fine and I'm sure there are lots of installs like that around the country.I'm not a gas safe person though. If you're worried then find a phone number for gas-safe and ring them for advice.


Many thanks. I'm sure it'll be fine

The guys an idiot he didn't even notify the boiler with gas Safe or whoever so once this was discovered I then thought what else has this guy not done hopefully this point will however be fine.

Thanks
was this guy gas safe registered? if so complain to your local inspector as stated above I think they didn't follow regs. they'll come out free and inspect it. if they find faults they should contact the person and get them to rectify it. if they weren't gas safe registered then I think best to get it inspected by an engineer
As far as I'm aware it is illegal to install a gas boiler if you are not registered.
Buckbeak006 h, 6 m ago

okay I see your point, only reason why I'm brining this up is this;Part D …okay I see your point, only reason why I'm brining this up is this;Part D - INSTALLATION PIPEWORKEnclosed pipes19.—(1) No person shall install any part of any installation pipework in a wall or a floor or standing of solid construction unless it is so constructed and installed as to be protected against failure caused by the movement of the wall, the floor or the standing as the case may be. (2) No person shall install any installation pipework so as to pass through a wall or a floor or standing of solid construction (whether or not it contains any cavity) from one side to the other unless— (a)any part of the pipe within such wall, floor or standing as the case may be takes the shortest practicable route; and(b)adequate means are provided to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any escape of gas from the pipework passing through the wall, floor or standing from entering any cavity in the wall, floor or standing.


Buckbeak005 h, 49 m ago

...see my extract from current Uk legislation... highlighted in bold …...see my extract from current Uk legislation... highlighted in bold saying it should be sealed


From that specific text I do not read where it says the pipe should be sealed as it passes through the wall - on the contrary, it indicates a non-contact protective enclosure (inc hole) around the pipe as it passes through the wall should be as large as possible so that it allows for maximum movement of the wall without the wall coming into contact with the actual gas pipe; plus if the wall has a cavity, the cavity should have protection from gas entering it.
Not suggesting that interpretation is best practice in the overall context of an installation, just that it is a very plausible and literal interpretaion related exclusively to the specific text you quote.
Pipe should be sleeved and sealed at one end only.
You are supposed to sleeve it and seal on the inside so if it was to leak it wouldnt go into the cavity but outside.
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