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Broadband and phone in new home.

8
Posted 21st Sep
hi all. when moving home ,is it normal for our new ISP to contact the residents of our new property about us having broadband installed the day after they vacate?
thanks in advance
PS, never done it before
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8 Comments
No it not.
Under uk law that's would be a breach of privacy.
I would phone the company and complane.make sure you speak to complaints department or a manager
Edited by: "1Eye" 21st Sep
1Eye21/09/2019 13:49

No it not.Under uk law that's would be a breach of privacy.I would phone …No it not.Under uk law that's would be a breach of privacy.I would phone the company and complane.make sure you speak to complaints department or a manager


Thanks 1 eye.
unclejim2721/09/2019 14:15

Thanks 1 eye.


They can write a letter to the address to you to confirm things are sorted, if the new person opens your post that is not the company’s fault.

The company may also send a letter to “the occupier” and offer them a deal to sign up for new services.
One possible scenario: if it's a line takeover instigated by you (the future occupier), the existing provider's ISP will normally write to the present (leaving) occupier to notify a takeover is to occur, especially if the existing (leaving) occupier has not issued a cease instruction (where a cease instruction may require 2+ weeks to arrange re-instatement of services by a new customer). The letter from the existing occupier's ISP will (should) not state the consumer's name that is taking over the line, therefore no data privacy issues.
Consider that if the existing ISP did not write to or otherwise notify its customer of a line takeover, any Thomas, William or Harry with access to a few (blag) credentials could terminate any customers' services at will (think neighbour dispute revenge, etc).
AndyRoyd21/09/2019 14:50

One possible scenario: if it's a line takeover instigated by you (the …One possible scenario: if it's a line takeover instigated by you (the future occupier), the existing provider's ISP will normally write to the present (leaving) occupier to notify a takeover is to occur, especially if the existing (leaving) occupier has not issued a cease instruction (where a cease instruction may require 2+ weeks to arrange re-instatement of services by a new customer). The letter from the existing occupier's ISP will (should) not state the consumer's name that is taking over the line, therefore no data privacy issues.Consider that if the existing ISP did not write to or otherwise notify its customer of a line takeover, any Thomas, William or Harry with access to a few (blag) credentials could terminate any customers' services at will (think neighbour dispute revenge, etc).


Thanks Andy, so if the present occupier received a letter, would he be able to stop the line takeover by just calling the ISP?
Edited by: "unclejim27" 21st Sep
unclejim2721/09/2019 15:26

Thanks Andy, so if the present occupier received a letter, would he be …Thanks Andy, so if the present occupier received a letter, would he be able to stop the line takeover by just calling the ISP?


Yes, but that would also mean the existing occupier would be liable for the cost of ongoing services, as accrued by the new occupier.
AndyRoyd21/09/2019 15:37

Yes, but that would also mean the existing occupier would be liable for …Yes, but that would also mean the existing occupier would be liable for the cost of ongoing services, as accrued by the new occupier.


Thanks Andy, it begins to make sense. You've been a big help.
It's not your new ISP contacting them, It's the current occupiers ISP contacting their customer, yes It's normal and yes they can.
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