Buying my first Car...

36
Posted 24th Apr
I’m currently learning to drive as I have a 1 Year Old son. I’ve been searching for a while and I think I know what car I’m after.

But I’m torn between buying from Auto Trader etc or buying from a dealership.

Though some of the prices after finance are quite steep.

What does everyone recommend?
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Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver it could be costing you thousands per year to insure, different cars will attract vastly different prices.
36 Comments
New or pre-owned? If it's the latter I would go to a dealership, if it goes wrong within the first 30 days you can get a full refund, after 30 days and less than 6 months they only get one chance to fix it then it's a full refund, this is law so they have no other option.

Private sale might be more complicated if you bought a lemon
Edited by: "4Real2016" 24th Apr
4Real201624/04/2019 19:08

New or pre-owned? If it's the latter I would go to a dealership, if it …New or pre-owned? If it's the latter I would go to a dealership, if it goes wrong within the first 30 days you can get a full refund, after 30 days and less than 6 months they only get one chance to fix it then it's a full refund, this is law so they have no other option.Private sale might be more complicated if you bought a lemon


Thanks I had no idea about that. I’m going pre-owned. First car, I don’t want a cheap car because I want something safe for the wee man.
Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver it could be costing you thousands per year to insure, different cars will attract vastly different prices.
Volvo Estate .... last for years and will swallow all your bits and pieces.
Its a bit disparaging to call your husband "the wee man"
666FU11 m ago

Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver …Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver it could be costing you thousands per year to insure, different cars will attract vastly different prices.


I’ve been doing searches for all the cars and they’re roughly about the same... I’m 32 so it’s not too bad, considering.
GwanGy9 m ago

Volvo Estate .... last for years and will swallow all your bits and …Volvo Estate .... last for years and will swallow all your bits and pieces. Its a bit disparaging to call your husband "the wee man"


Husband? He calls me wee man.
A Ford focus or fiesta, nothing too big and really cheap to run and service. Cheap doesn't necessarily mean unsafe. Ive got a "cheap" mondeo which I'm sure is safer than more expensive ones. Keep it simple and popular for a first car till you know all the running costs
kaney196724/04/2019 19:14

Thanks I had no idea about that. I’m going pre-owned. First car, I don’t wa …Thanks I had no idea about that. I’m going pre-owned. First car, I don’t want a cheap car because I want something safe for the wee man.


For a given budget a more recent model will generally be safer than an old one. So 3 year old supermini is generally a better bet than spending the same amount a 12 year old range rover.

Also, be aware that the EuroNCAP scores may not be what you think.

For example if you look at the Peugeot 3008/5008 and the Renault Scenic:
euroncap.com/en/…581
euroncap.com/en/…044

3008 scores 85% child protection, Scenic scores 82%. 3008 is safer right?

If you expand the child protection section and look at the details you'll find it's actually the Scenic which performed better in the crash test, but was penalised a couple of points because the manual was unclear on the proper installation of a child seat in the front passenger seat.
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 24th Apr
EndlessWaves24/04/2019 19:51

For a given budget a more recent model will generally be safer than an old …For a given budget a more recent model will generally be safer than an old one. So 3 year old supermini is generally a better bet than spending the same amount a 12 year old range rover.Also, be aware that the EuroNCAP scores may not be what you think.For example if you look at the Peugeot 3008/5008 and the Renault Scenic:https://www.euroncap.com/en/results/peugeot/3008/5008/26581https://www.euroncap.com/en/results/renault/scenic/250443008 scores 85% child protection, Scenic scores 82%. 3008 is safer right? If you expand the child protection section and look at the details you'll find it's actually the Scenic which performed better in the crash test, but was penalised a couple of points because the manual was unclear on the proper installation of a child seat in the front passenger seat.


Cheers mate! I’ll definitely look into that too. I’m definitely looking for something newer and safer. I’m not worried about my driving but the amount of bad drivers on the road.
kaney196733 m ago

Cheers mate! I’ll definitely look into that too. I’m definitely looking for …Cheers mate! I’ll definitely look into that too. I’m definitely looking for something newer and safer. I’m not worried about my driving but the amount of bad drivers on the road.


Most of the bad drivers clogging up the motorways hogging the middle lanes are suv drivers, steer clear of them
Sc4mp024/04/2019 19:35

A Ford focus or fiesta, nothing too big and really cheap to run and …A Ford focus or fiesta, nothing too big and really cheap to run and service. Cheap doesn't necessarily mean unsafe. Ive got a "cheap" mondeo which I'm sure is safer than more expensive ones. Keep it simple and popular for a first car till you know all the running costs


I’m learning in a focus, but I think I like the Fiesta. A lot of the ones I’ve seen have done a good number of miles, which I don’t find a massive problem, considering that the one I’m learning is has done over 127000. The older the person to ask they tend to frown at the idea a car might be close to 100000. But I have seen a couple of decent cars at smaller independent dealers that work out almost £3k less than the ones at Evans Halshaw etc.
If we are recommending manufacturers then you should definitely look at Honda for reliability, they seem to just go forever without any headaches, ask any mechanic if Honda engines are reliable.
Edited by: "4Real2016" 24th Apr
Buy something at less than £1k for a first car. That way you can learn to drive in it without worrying about minor dings and scratches (you learn to drive after you have passed your test and are out on your own). After your first year or so you can then spend more money on a better car.
Choose the car more based on insurance costs than anything else as that will be the biggest expense. For a sub 1K car I would buy privately.
Have a look at toyota aygo/citroen c1/peugeot 107. Cost pennies to insure and run. £20 a year tax.

I have a 2year old and drive around in a citroen c1. Fuel is fantastic.
kaney19675 h, 13 m ago

I’m learning in a focus, but I think I like the Fiesta. A lot of the ones I …I’m learning in a focus, but I think I like the Fiesta. A lot of the ones I’ve seen have done a good number of miles, which I don’t find a massive problem, considering that the one I’m learning is has done over 127000. The older the person to ask they tend to frown at the idea a car might be close to 100000. But I have seen a couple of decent cars at smaller independent dealers that work out almost £3k less than the ones at Evans Halshaw etc.


I'm on my second focus (upgraded from a mk1 after 4 years, paid £1k for it, 2001, 32,000 miles), now got a mk3 and am pleased with it. Paid just under £5k for a 2011 on 47,000 miles (fresh mot/service and 12 month warranty). I was also looking at a mk7.5 fiesta but decided to stick with the focus as I didn't want to for a smaller car and the focus generally comes with a better spec (dab, bluetooth etc, I added factory reversing sensors for £80), both are good though.
Edited by: "dcx_badass" 25th Apr
As strange as it sounds, a larger car and engine might be cheaper to insure than a low powered super mini.

It's all about statistics in your area so if less people near you crash mondeos than corsas, then a mondeo might be cheaper to insure.

Select a few cars you'd like and quote them on a comparison site which should hopefully narrow down your search.
Fiesta is probably the best all round car you can buy when it comes to value and reliability.
kaney196724/04/2019 20:31

I’m learning in a focus, but I think I like the Fiesta. A lot of the ones I …I’m learning in a focus, but I think I like the Fiesta. A lot of the ones I’ve seen have done a good number of miles, which I don’t find a massive problem, considering that the one I’m learning is has done over 127000. The older the person to ask they tend to frown at the idea a car might be close to 100000. But I have seen a couple of decent cars at smaller independent dealers that work out almost £3k less than the ones at Evans Halshaw etc.


I'm quite surprised at that to be honest, any discussions I've had about cars it tends to be the older lot that don't care about high mileage as they know it doesn't make much of a difference to a well serviced car.

My wife has a Corsa now(used to have a fiesta), I've been trying to get her to change to a focus. Although both nice cars that have served her well I wish she had a focus which is a bit bigger as it would feel and be for her and our little one.

Would lots, of small trips, be your main sort of trip? Petrol card are cheaper to service and generally repair than a diesel.
adamspencer951 h, 11 m ago

As strange as it sounds, a larger car and engine might be cheaper to …As strange as it sounds, a larger car and engine might be cheaper to insure than a low powered super mini.It's all about statistics in your area so if less people near you crash mondeos than corsas, then a mondeo might be cheaper to insure.Select a few cars you'd like and quote them on a comparison site which should hopefully narrow down your search.


Literally this
My first car was Mondeo , cost of insurance 1100.... Looked at fiesta and focus (as well as others) cost to insure 2k and up... Does not make sense at all.
Sc4mp03 h, 36 m ago

I'm quite surprised at that to be honest, any discussions I've had about …I'm quite surprised at that to be honest, any discussions I've had about cars it tends to be the older lot that don't care about high mileage as they know it doesn't make much of a difference to a well serviced car.My wife has a Corsa now(used to have a fiesta), I've been trying to get her to change to a focus. Although both nice cars that have served her well I wish she had a focus which is a bit bigger as it would feel and be for her and our little one.Would lots, of small trips, be your main sort of trip? Petrol card are cheaper to service and generally repair than a diesel.


At first small trips but eventually I’d like to go away for the weekends and holidays. I was thinking maybe getting used to the Fiesta and moving up to a Focus.

But my instructor is in his 60’s and wouldn’t entertain a car that’s done a good bit of mileage. It doesn’t bother me as long as it’s been serviced well.
adamspencer9525/04/2019 07:45

As strange as it sounds, a larger car and engine might be cheaper to …As strange as it sounds, a larger car and engine might be cheaper to insure than a low powered super mini.It's all about statistics in your area so if less people near you crash mondeos than corsas, then a mondeo might be cheaper to insure.Select a few cars you'd like and quote them on a comparison site which should hopefully narrow down your search.


It’s not just that, the demand for super minis, a Fiesta being a prime example, seem to be worth more than a Focus. I’ll do a search for insurance on a Focus tonight and see how it works out.
kaney19677 m ago

It’s not just that, the demand for super minis, a Fiesta being a prime e …It’s not just that, the demand for super minis, a Fiesta being a prime example, seem to be worth more than a Focus. I’ll do a search for insurance on a Focus tonight and see how it works out.


i don't think it's demand as such, probably more popularity and statistics

if there are 5m fiestas (as a wild example) and 5% of them crash, that's 250K claims against Fiestas

if there are only 1m focus' (again a wild example) and 5% crash, that's 50K claims against Focus'

so assuming a similar average percentage of accidents as would be expected across the country, the less common car would appear as less of an insurance risk

paired with the fact there aren't many young drivers with focus' as they are family cars, i would assume the accident rate for a focus is a lot lower than a fiesta..

thats the problem with statistics, they can be manipulated to show whatever you want...
666FU17 h, 22 m ago

Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver …Look at what it is going to cost to insure before you buy. As a new driver it could be costing you thousands per year to insure, different cars will attract vastly different prices.



Mine was £360 fully comp, down to £250 in this my second year and only £100 excess which I insured for a fiver.
I’ve always had a Ford Ka too small if you plan to expand your family, upgraded to a Fiesta now I’m with two children in tow I can happily fit in a buggy some shopping & comfortable for children.
Easy to repair, fair priced & usually good on insurance.
Ideal First car
Would recommend BMW M6 gran coupe
Buying privately is a risk, but can save £££s. You can get a “feel” of whether the seller is genuine about the car or not within a few minutes. Ask how long they’ve owned it (important), why selling etc.... Take someone who has some basic knowledge of cars to check service history, condition of fluids, oil contamination. Check condition of tyres too.

And before you’ve even gone to look check the MOT history (if applicable)
gov.uk/che…ory
Edited by: "u664541" 26th Apr
u6645419 m ago

Buying privately is a risk, but can save £££s. You can get a “feel” of whet …Buying privately is a risk, but can save £££s. You can get a “feel” of whether the seller is genuine about the car or not within a few minutes. Ask how long they’ve owned it (important), why selling etc.... Take someone who has some basic knowledge of cars to check service history, condition of fluids, oil contamination. Check condition of tyres too.And before you’ve even gone to look check the MOT history (if applicable)https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-history


the MOT history point is very important and can give you an indication whether it's likely to be a rust bucket with problems and whether it has been looked after
Caroline_199325/04/2019 01:23

Have a look at toyota aygo/citroen c1/peugeot 107. Cost pennies to insure …Have a look at toyota aygo/citroen c1/peugeot 107. Cost pennies to insure and run. £20 a year tax. I have a 2year old and drive around in a citroen c1. Fuel is fantastic.


These are great little cars, but if OP has a 1 year old then buggy, baby seat and associated baby paraphernalia will be a struggle to all fit in.
If you're buying privately make sure you cover yourself by doing a full HPI check on the car. Some people try to sell cars that have been written off, clocked, or still have finance attached to them without disclosing it.

If you're looking at finance figures with a dealer, don't be fooled into purchasing one on PCP. Although the sales staff will make it sound pleasant and convincing, I pesonally would only buy a car on standard Hire Purchase. PCPs were introduced to force people to switch cars more often, making more money for finance companies and dealers, and often leaving consumers with negative equity they end up having to "just carry over" to their next agreement. People somehow justify this loss with the reasoning they get bored of cars quickly, and so that makes it OK to them.

Dealers will likely not discuss the finance rate with you unless you mention it, and instead focus only on monthly payment and additional extras. This is so they can sell you a finance package at a rate that is beneficial to them and not you, and certainly has nothing to do with your credit rating. I believe the FCA are investigating dealers for this now. Warranties are great depending on who they're actually with; a lot of them are third-party, whereas some will be with the dealer group themselves if they're large enough (these are the better ones). Be cautious in these places, they exist only to make as much money as possible from you.

Before pulling the trigger I would take a look at some of the cars being recommended here, in particular the Ford Fiesta. The 1.0 EcoBoost engine is brilliant.

Hope this helps!
u66454159 m ago

These are great little cars, but if OP has a 1 year old then buggy, baby …These are great little cars, but if OP has a 1 year old then buggy, baby seat and associated baby paraphernalia will be a struggle to all fit in.


Not really. Car seat fits in no issues. I bought a buggy that fits in the boot for £40.
insanitee26/04/2019 09:32

If you're buying privately make sure you cover yourself by doing a full …If you're buying privately make sure you cover yourself by doing a full HPI check on the car. Some people try to sell cars that have been written off, clocked, or still have finance attached to them without disclosing it.If you're looking at finance figures with a dealer, don't be fooled into purchasing one on PCP. Although the sales staff will make it sound pleasant and convincing, I pesonally would only buy a car on standard Hire Purchase. PCPs were introduced to force people to switch cars more often, making more money for finance companies and dealers, and often leaving consumers with negative equity they end up having to "just carry over" to their next agreement. People somehow justify this loss with the reasoning they get bored of cars quickly, and so that makes it OK to them.Dealers will likely not discuss the finance rate with you unless you mention it, and instead focus only on monthly payment and additional extras. This is so they can sell you a finance package at a rate that is beneficial to them and not you, and certainly has nothing to do with your credit rating. I believe the FCA are investigating dealers for this now. Warranties are great depending on who they're actually with; a lot of them are third-party, whereas some will be with the dealer group themselves if they're large enough (these are the better ones). Be cautious in these places, they exist only to make as much money as possible from you.Before pulling the trigger I would take a look at some of the cars being recommended here, in particular the Ford Fiesta. The 1.0 EcoBoost engine is brilliant.Hope this helps!


PCP works for some people. Doesn't work for you, OK, but that doesn't mean you should scare everyone else off it.

PCP on new cars generally is beneficial over paying with cash as you generally get 0% / low interest rates and a significant deposit contribution from the manufacturer. This often means you pay less with PCP than buying with cash, as I did with my last Ford Fiesta (2 years 0% and £1600 contribution from Ford) so your scaremongering is not appreciated.
You will pay double from a dealer.
Take someone who knows about cars with you to view/buy.
I would buy as cheap as possible . . . but it's your call/money
adamspencer9526/04/2019 10:03

PCP works for some people. Doesn't work for you, OK, but that doesn't mean …PCP works for some people. Doesn't work for you, OK, but that doesn't mean you should scare everyone else off it.PCP on new cars generally is beneficial over paying with cash as you generally get 0% / low interest rates and a significant deposit contribution from the manufacturer. This often means you pay less with PCP than buying with cash, as I did with my last Ford Fiesta (2 years 0% and £1600 contribution from Ford) so your scaremongering is not appreciated.



If you're in the market for a new car, a PCP with a large deposit contribution is great. You can pay it off straight away (if you're not happy with the interest rate) and save a chunk of money in comparison with buying cash. The OP is not looking for a new car however, and can't benefit from using a PCP as a tool to save money on a purchase.

I simply wanted to highlight the pitfalls first time buyers usually aren't aware of, so when the OP does walk into a dealer they don't rinse him/her as I saw happen so many times at the group I worked at. Finance managers love unknowledgeable buyers, and not enough people are aware of how their car finance agreements, or dealers, actually work.
insanitee26th Apr

If you're in the market for a new car, a PCP with a large deposit …If you're in the market for a new car, a PCP with a large deposit contribution is great. You can pay it off straight away (if you're not happy with the interest rate) and save a chunk of money in comparison with buying cash. The OP is not looking for a new car however, and can't benefit from using a PCP as a tool to save money on a purchase.I simply wanted to highlight the pitfalls first time buyers usually aren't aware of, so when the OP does walk into a dealer they don't rinse him/her as I saw happen so many times at the group I worked at. Finance managers love unknowledgeable buyers, and not enough people are aware of how their car finance agreements, or dealers, actually work.


to be fair, the OP didn't specify whether it was new/used but its fair to assume used, granted.

fair enough, and for a used car, PCP isn't ideal but each to their own.
If you get a ford invest £10 in a Ford elm327 cable and you can enable extra features for charge for. So far I've turned on hill start assist, tyre pressure monitoring, Auto locking (anti-hijack, e.g. Auto lock the doors when you go over 5mph+) and fitted some £80 ford reversing sensors (eBay scrapyard) then enabled them with the cable so they're integrated into the stereo and show the obstacle distance on the screen and beep.

Depending on the spec there's loads more you can do, enable trip computer, open/close windows with your keyfob. etc.
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