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    camera experts whats the better focal length

    whats a better focal length 28mm to 140 mm or 35 mm to 175mm
    the lower means ??? and the higher means??
    not got a clue but looking at 2 cameras and one are very similar except the focal length what is this and whats the best one to go for 28-140 or 35-175 and why.
    Thank you in advance

    14 Comments

    The lower number quoted describes the 'wide angle'. ie the lower the number,the wider the view - the more it can see. Think about blinkers on either side of the camera moving back as the focal length gets smaller. The lower this number is (within reason) - the better. 28 is ok
    The bigger number describes the zoom - how much it can appear to bring disatant objects nearer to the camera - like a telescope. The bigger this number is, the better(again, within reason).
    Out of these two, the 28/140 is more general, snapshot friendly and would be by far the best one for someone whose knowledege of cameras in general means that they had to ask in the first place. There is much more to a camera than just the focal length of the lens. Chase up some reviews on google if not sure. Cheers

    im no expert but are you on about the lens for the camera ?
    If its a DSLR your on about them measurements are for the lens the lower measurements will do more wide angles and closer objects and the higher measurements 140 & 175 will be just like a zoom on a camera so you can get close up shots the higher the number the closer the zoom.
    Thats my guess anyway someone will probably know in better detail
    steve

    All I know is I wish I had 28mm

    Hi, the focal length is the distance between the cameras sensor and the lens. The lower the number - the wider the angle meaning you can fit more into a picture.
    Edited by: "Danny_d" 12th Jun 2011

    It depends on what you want to do with the lens. The lower the focal length in mm the wider angle shot the camera can take. By that I mean the more width you can add to your photos. However if you want the maximum zoom you want the lens with the highest mm focal length.

    There's not a massive difference between them if you are just starting out.

    Basically the 28-140mm will give you a wider angle you can shoot at but at the sacrifice of the zoom level. If you want to shoot wide landscapes this would give you a wider angle.

    The 35-175mm will give you the higher zoom whilst sacrificing a little wide angle. If you want to get as close as you can to subjects then this is the better. Plus 28mm-35mm is like 7mm it isn't a great deal of difference.

    I would go for the 35mm-175 personally.

    Edited by: "CyDoNiA" 12th Jun 2011

    whatsThePoint

    I wouldn't decide which just by the lens, what cameras are you looking at



    Agreed. If you aren't buying an SLR you need to consider the features and quality of the cameras.

    A simplified answer would be,
    The distance between the camera lens (or actually the focal point) and where the image of an infinite object is brought in to focus is the focal length, 28mm or 80mm for example.
    Many professional lenses had and still have the focal point marked on the body of the lens.

    This doesn't work with say a single lens reflex camera where the mirror gets in the way of where such a lens needs to be if it has a very short focal length so an inverted telephoto design is used.
    This means that the distance between the lens and the focal plane (Where the film or sensor is)
    can be more or less fixed and is why most modern cameras don't need bellows for example to vary the distance between the lens and the focal plane
    The 28mm quoted on many digital cameras is usually the equivalent angle of view to what a lens would produce on a 35mm camera not the actual focal length of the lens so that we have something known (by photographers) to mentally judge it against.
    28 is fairly wide, anything less is very wide angle and starts to produce other sometimes
    unwanted distortions although these can be used to put emphasis on parts of the photograph.
    The standard lens of a 35mm film camera was generally regarded as 50mm so anything beyond that is going into the telephoto area. Don't forget that a very wide range might be produced
    by giving up quality for the headline lengths. A good Professional lens with a wide zoom range
    can be VERY expensive. I hope that make is clearer.

    Original Poster

    The cameras are very similar except this
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS9 or the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS10
    also looks like the fs9 as a better iso ??

    Edited by: "shamus1975" 12th Jun 2011

    Original Poster

    as above

    CyDoNiA

    Agreed. If you aren't buying an SLR you need to consider the features and … Agreed. If you aren't buying an SLR you need to consider the features and quality of the cameras.


    Higher ISO just means you can shoot in darker conditions but the higher the ISO number the more noise you will get. Don't be too fooled by quotes of ISO 6400 etc as 99% of the time you won't want to go anywhere higher than ISO800.

    Original Poster

    the 2 cameras compared are in a table in the link side by side which would you go for

    camera-catalog.com/com…s10

    Original Poster

    Thanks for all the advice i have decided on the panasonic Lumix FS9

    none of the original ones mentioned
    electrocentreltd.com/vie…606

    shamus1975

    Thanks for all the advice i have decided on the panasonic Lumix FS9none … Thanks for all the advice i have decided on the panasonic Lumix FS9none of the original ones mentioned http://www.electrocentreltd.com/viewproduct.asp?pid=6606



    Fair enough choice - I've used Panasonic lumix cameras for some time and like them though I prefer the Leica lens. You will only need to upgrade if you outgrow the camera and you find that it will not let you do the things you want to do. There should be a switch on this camera to chose between showing photographs and taking them. Always keep this switch in 'show photo' mode when the camera is switched off.In the 'take photo' mode the lens comes out when you switch the camera on and if this happens inside your pocket or bag it can severely damage the lens mechanism.
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