Camera for beginner

16
Found 5th Jul
Good evening all hope you are well.
I'd like to get into photography as a hobby. No experience, apart from with my mobile.
I'm interested in taking photos of the night sky and using my telescope. I'm also interested in getting day to day photos, seaside, sunsets, flowers, wildlife etc...
i was hoping someone could direct me to a camera thats a good all rounder for my interests.
My budget is around £450, obviously looking for the best equipment for my budget.
I've seen 2 already-
Nikon Coolpix P900 & Nikon D3400
Many thanks for any advice given.
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16 Comments
Have a look at second hand stuff on gumtree. Get something that someone else started with... look for local clubs in
Area and they might be able to help you
hotukdeals.com/dis…712
There might be a few people here who could help
Thank you both of you... gives me somewhere to start. I'll update how i get on thanks.
I don’t own a DSLR myself but I wanted to get into photography as a hobby myself so I read up quite a bit and the most popular choice for a beginner I came across was the Nikon D3400. Should be able to pick one up for under £350.
Good luck with taking pictures of the night sky I've tried using my Canon EOS 40D with live view and a 70-200mm F4 lens and still can't get sharp focus (you have to focus manually).
Bigfootpete19 m ago

Good luck with taking pictures of the night sky I've tried using my Canon …Good luck with taking pictures of the night sky I've tried using my Canon EOS 40D with live view and a 70-200mm F4 lens and still can't get sharp focus (you have to focus manually).


your lens is too slow and your focal length is too long for sky unless you're trying for a set point
sillyoldbear4 m ago

your lens is too slow and your focal length is too long for sky unless …your lens is too slow and your focal length is too long for sky unless you're trying for a set point


What camera would you reccomend for me ?
First thing is that if you are going for a 'proper' camera rather than a bridge or instant then the cost is in the lenses not the camera body. Worth checking what cheap lenses will work with the body you buy. Some of the entry level nikons dont work properly with older lenses (autofocus wont work) on other systems you can use lenses from even old film cameras and they are often perfectly good and very cheap.

I would buy a used mid range or pro level camera rather than a new consumer camera. The higher range cameras tend to have better menu systems which makes a difference when you're trying to change settings as you go. Personally I would always want a body with twin control dials, which tends to mean higher spec bodies (it just means that you can have independent control of aperture and exposure)

Check the number of images taken in the camera stats - especially if it is a dslr with a mirror. the shutter/mirror systems have a specified livespan and if they fail its game over really.

For astro photography you can use an f4 lens ok but you must have a stable tripod, use manual mode long exposure. If you want to shoot deep space objects DSO then you will need a motorised mount - theres no way you can track without - this gets expensive fast. join stargazerslounge forum and sak questions there.
Wow... its a bit of a minefield... great advice from you all, the links have helped a lot too. What cameras do you have ? And what do you use it for? Are you happy with your camera ?
StraightandNarrow27 m ago

Wow... its a bit of a minefield... great advice from you all, the links …Wow... its a bit of a minefield... great advice from you all, the links have helped a lot too. What cameras do you have ? And what do you use it for? Are you happy with your camera ?


I have a fuji xt10 I do a lot of street photography with prime vintage lenses, it's not so intimidating as a full frame/DSLR camera and half the bulk of a full frame camera, i also use it for macro and fun bokeh shots along with slow/still nature, landscape and portrait. It's not so great for using with fast large lenses(fast sport fast nature as the body is small. and your lenses are in the bad side of the 4 figure dept which doesn't appeal to me. I'm very happy with it. I chose it because it was a good deal at the time, I wasn't brand focussed because in reality any DLSR/mirrorless of a decent brand will perform within 95% of each other. (lens and lens costs are a different matter) As @mas99 says astrophotography starts off costing next to nothing then you're suddenly into proper money very quickly. It really depends what you want from your camera and how you intend to use it but generally until you try it you don't know if you like it so it's a bit of a catch 22.


Would I buy another DSLR : Yes
Would I buy another mirrorless : Yes
Would I buy a full frame : If the price was right
Would I buy a bridge: No
I'd agree with everything sillyoldbear says.

It is always the case that the camera you have with you is better than any superdupermega thing thats in a cupboard at home
Things have come a long way and the various mirrorless cameras are very good and being more compact than a trad dslr they are more likely to be carried with - especially with a nice compact prime lens.

We have a couple of pentax dslrs. They work with old manual lenses, old af (autofocus lenses) and newer stuff. They are weather sealed (although not all pentax bodies and lenses are). They are mirrored so are bulkier than sob's fuji.

A couple of things I'd suggest.

go try the camera in the shop - how they feel in the hand does matter - weight, balance, feel - remember that lenses can make a big difference to balance aand how comfortable a body is to hold.

Check how the viewfinder relates to the picture - most viewfinders give a reduced view compared to the picture - sure digital is easy to crop but it can be irritating.

Play with the menus - can you quickly and easily access the settings that you want? aperture, shutter speed and iso are the obvious ones, but depending on what you are doing other options may also be important to you - metering modes, focus points, flash settings, etc

performance in low light conditions - this is something that does show up the differences between different sensors - how good are the images at high iso - and dont rely on the manufacturers quoted iso figures. on magazine did a review a few years ago and some iso400 were the same as anothers iso800. Take sample pics if possible to see how the image degrades at high iso.

resolution isnt the be all - colour rendition is a bigger deal to me - there are gazillions of modes on cameras these days - check the modes and see what works for you.


Would i buy dslr - yes
would i buy mirrorless - yes
would i buy full frame - yes - if i could afford it
would i buy a bridge - no
sillyoldbear4 h, 30 m ago

your lens is too slow and your focal length is too long for sky unless …your lens is too slow and your focal length is too long for sky unless you're trying for a set point


Yeah - I tried using my 50mm f1.8 but that's impossible to get the focus right, so I tried using the 70-200 f4 at 70mm on a single bright star.
Sorry for the late reply... I've done quite a lot of research now. Thank you all, for the advice and direction.. I'm torn between the Nikon D5300 and Nikon D5600. The price varies so much on Amazon. Literally £100- £150 difference, depending on what day of the week it is.
Thank you again everyone. I am very grateful
Have you actually held them in a shop to see how they feel in your hands? I tried a few and for me Canon was more intuitive/natural, but it's entirely subjective, but I'd try them in the flesh before you buy into an eco system. I have a Canon 1000D but will be upgrading sometime this year (probably to a 200D).
Good point... i will do that tomorrow, I'm hoping to land a good deal on Monday Amazon Prime day. Thanks again for that.
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