Can a bathroom extractor vent to the hallway?

17
Found 24th Jul 2012
One for the builders among us..

Basically our B/Room is in the middle of the house upstairs, and for years has been hooked up to a 5m vent hose to an extractor fan in the b/room, basically this is not doing the job and is leaving the room all steamy and damp feeling. So I am thinking of putting the vent over the door, and opening a window when people use the shower/bath in the hall?

Any suggestions?
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17 Comments
Why can't you vent through the ceiling?
DAMNOME

Why can't you vent through the ceiling?



Well it is like that at the moment, but the pipe is so long it is getting damp at the end I think and is making the ceiling in another room damp.
I couldn't have a bathroom without a window. I dont understand post 2 though
Put in a more powerful extractor or a second one further down the hose?
churchill

I couldn't have a bathroom without a window. I dont understand post 2 … I couldn't have a bathroom without a window. I dont understand post 2 though



Bathroom is in the middle of the house, pipe is going from bathroom to an external wall and venting, but the pipe is very long I don't think it is strong enough, and the pipe keeps perishing because the condensation is condensing creating a pool of water in the pipe, before it is extracted.
GAVINLEWISHUKD

Put in a more powerful extractor or a second one further down the hose?



Looks like this is one solution, only thing is the good ones are pretty expensive and my loft is like a rubbish tip, not much room to mount it.
No you cannot vent into a hallway. You can buy solid ducting in place of the hose, but if you stick with the hose would recommend an inline fan as well as the ceiling mounted one in the bathroom. With solid ducting you want to take it as high as you can directly above the vent fan and then slope down as much as possible to the exterior vent. If that makes sense.
is it possible to fit another fan at the end of the 5m ducting that is powered by the same power when the original fan is turned on (in tandem)?

5mtrs is a fair distance for a 4" /100mm extractor

also you dont want to be leaving the bathroom door open but you do need an airflow into the bathroom - 10mm gap at bottom of the door will help
Edited by: "philphil61" 24th Jul 2012
try just leaving the upstairs windows open after someone has used the bathroom

but i would use the equipment you have got and re-direct it into the loftspace assuming it is directly above the bathroom

2 hrs planning ( with a six pack )

1 hours work
ciarandanielbyrne1

try just leaving the upstairs windows open after someone has used the … try just leaving the upstairs windows open after someone has used the bathroombut i would use the equipment you have got and re-direct it into the loftspace assuming it is directly above the bathroom2 hrs planning ( with a six pack )1 hours work



Don't vent directly into the loft - that is crazy and will cause no end of problems further down the line. As suggested a second fan (inline with a good flow rate) further down will help. If your ceiling is getting damp in another room, then you have a leak, the extraction pipe should not leak.
Whatever you do don't vent into the loft space as above unless you want a serious case of timber rot in the future. The existing dampness could possibly be a leak or interstitial condensation depending on where it is located.
Milkfloat

Don't vent directly into the loft - that is crazy and will cause no end … Don't vent directly into the loft - that is crazy and will cause no end of problems further down the line. As suggested a second fan (inline with a good flow rate) further down will help. If your ceiling is getting damp in another room, then you have a leak, the extraction pipe should not leak.



It is a bad design I think, the tube goes along the loft floor then up into a small chimney style thing, I think it is hitting the dew point before it gets there. Or the connection is leaking itself.

Perhaps some new pipe, getting the connection right and a more powerful fan?
I would try a powerful fan before anything else. The air has to go somewhere and a weak fan would pool water like you are getting.
as my first suggestion - put another fan in-line in the up pipe to assist the extraction

ur problem of damp seems to be lack of good extraction... once the steam passes into the vent it becomes cool and turns into condensation (water droplets) and the fan cannot force water droplets upwards

putting an in-line additional fan in the up piping will assist the original fan in expelling the steam / condensation better IMHO

aircanman

Well it is like that at the moment, but the pipe is so long it is getting … Well it is like that at the moment, but the pipe is so long it is getting damp at the end I think and is making the ceiling in another room damp.



A condensation trap in the ducting may help alleviate the problem with a stronger fan

http://www.fastlec.co.uk/bmz_cache/6/667cfd61a5490d7adceda962490e77c2.image.110x120.jpg

fastlec.co.uk/con…tml
not advisable as you won't always remember to open the window in the hall and you will end up with a damp hall.

you won't want to open the window in the middle of the winter either.
you wont get timber rot no way bud
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