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Can a shop sell for more than label?

33
Found 12th Jun 2014
Hello, I was in a local "corner shop" and I purchased a couple of items.They were in packaging from the manufacurer which had a price on it.The shop charged more than this, from a legal standpoint can they do this?

Thanks
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AskPrice Glitch
33 Comments
RRP = Recommended Retail Price
hi no I dont think they can sell it for more than it says if it is a price marked item
shops can charge whatever they want really it's just a recommended price
Yes
If it states RRP then as others have stated - yes they can sell it for whatever price

It depends on the actual price label - maybe an image would help to clarify.
It was just some crumby little Best One that think's the way to compete with the supermarkets is to rip off anyone that ventures in.Two items charged more for than they were labelled (Not actual price was listed on the shelf) and a 50p charge for using debit card on a £9.50 purchase.

I don't get why nobody values repeat custom, surely it's just common sense.Now I just won't go back there again, same thing happened at the hairdressers.I had the wrong student card with me so they wouldn't give the discount.For the sake of a couple of quid they've lost out on me going in there every month.
R716515K

Debit card charges are quite common too. It costs the retailer to process … Debit card charges are quite common too. It costs the retailer to process the payment, so if they're small then they can't afford to (and don't want to) lose out by processing a low value transaction. You'll tend to find they drop any extra charge at the £5 or £10 point usually though. My local shop does the same. I'll still use them and pay their higher prices from time to time as they have to make a living and they're providing a service that is convenient to me - more so than jumping in the motor to drive to a supermarket.



exactly. we charge 50p to use card as we have to pay BT a separate line rental bill!

second op did you look at the containers the stock came in I.e. bulk? they buy it and expect a return but if you mean a tin already is priced up with the tin label then no they can't charge any more. They are still making money that way anyway as the supplier makes this sound cheap for the customer but if yes then why didn't you ask the cashier? ???
Wooderson

It was just some crumby little Best One that think's the way to compete … It was just some crumby little Best One that think's the way to compete with the supermarkets is to rip off anyone that ventures in.Two items charged more for than they were labelled (Not actual price was listed on the shelf) and a 50p charge for using debit card on a £9.50 purchase.I don't get why nobody values repeat custom, surely it's just common sense.Now I just won't go back there again, same thing happened at the hairdressers.I had the wrong student card with me so they wouldn't give the discount.For the sake of a couple of quid they've lost out on me going in there every month.

I'm sure they'll be gutted to lose such a terrible customer like yourself.
Edited by: "GoatzRus" 12th Jun 2014
Usually the labeling reduced price is foisted on small shops as their retailers i.e. Bookers usually only have those items in stock and they still charge the same price to the shop for the item.As suggested its not a binding price marking and is up to the individual shop what they charge because it comes out of their small profit margin.
Edited by: "arachnoid" 12th Jun 2014
sofiasar

exactly. we charge 50p to use card as we have to pay BT a separate line … exactly. we charge 50p to use card as we have to pay BT a separate line rental bill!second op did you look at the containers the stock came in I.e. bulk? they buy it and expect a return but if you mean a tin already is priced up with the tin label then no they can't charge any more. They are still making money that way anyway as the supplier makes this sound cheap for the customer but if yes then why didn't you ask the cashier? ???




It was a 4 pack of Coors, it had special packaging that said £4.99 on, don't recall it saying RRP.The only thing was these were the only ones not marked with a price on the shelf, which seemed a little underhanded.

Same with the cigarettes, the manufacturers packaging said one price, was charged a different one.
GoatzRus

I'm sure they'll be gutted to lose such a terrible customer like yourself.




I agree, they're not worrying about it, and I know that I'm not, yet for some strange reason you are.You should sort your life out.
next time go in with the right money and hand it to them, priced goods+right money handed over=sold!
maddogb

next time go in with the right money and hand it to them, priced … next time go in with the right money and hand it to them, priced goods+right money handed over=sold!

=theft
craigstephens

=theft



no mate just the law, money changes hands deal is done
Please get out of my shop.
R716515K

Excellent. I'm just off to grab a 50 inch telly from John Lewis. I'll … Excellent. I'm just off to grab a 50 inch telly from John Lewis. I'll slap a tenner in the assistant's hands so the deal is done... (_;)A retailer can charge what they like for goods. It's up to you to accept that price or not - you don't get to choose what you pay; they do get to choose what they charge. Anything to do with pricing, clearly marking prices, MSRP or RRP is nothing but advice and guidelines.Anyway, s*d this. World Cup to watch.



yeah then you can argue with the telly, you might win that one by quoting out of context
Why would you pay it?

Just demand to pay what is written on the packet, if they decline, just don't go in there again.
HI GUYS. I think it is wrong when they up the price when you reach the till, many times ive been shopping with just the right amount of money for my goods I would go red faced and embarrassed if they charged me more than the price stated on the label, so I think in all fairness they should only charge you the price on the label.
maddogb

no mate just the law, money changes hands deal is done


Don't be rediculous.
LLANDWROG

HI GUYS. I think it is wrong when they up the price when you reach the … HI GUYS. I think it is wrong when they up the price when you reach the till, many times ive been shopping with just the right amount of money for my goods I would go red faced and embarrassed if they charged me more than the price stated on the label, so I think in all fairness they should only charge you the price on the label.



Read my previous explanation on why this usually occurs
craigstephens

Don't be rediculous.



ummm troll much?

its not only ridiculous its true, the pricing and placement on the shelf constitutes an offer, the handing over of cash and its acceptance is close of contract. as long as the shop assistant doesn't ask you for "his" price beforehand.
And if at that point they refuse you can go buy the item elsewhere and sue them for the difference.
been there done that.
maddogb

ummm troll much?its not only ridiculous its true, the pricing and … ummm troll much?its not only ridiculous its true, the pricing and placement on the shelf constitutes an offer, the handing over of cash and its acceptance is close of contract. as long as the shop assistant doesn't ask you for "his" price beforehand.And if at that point they refuse you can go buy the item elsewhere and sue them for the difference.been there done that.



The contract is not binding until the shopkeeper accepts the offer, you can't just slap some money on the counter and walk out with the goods, that is illegal.
NEtech

The contract is not binding until the shopkeeper accepts the offer, you … The contract is not binding until the shopkeeper accepts the offer, you can't just slap some money on the counter and walk out with the goods, that is illegal.



he is accepting by taking the money, now if he were to refuse the money then that's a different matter.
Well not really, if something costs £7.99 and I hand over a fiver before I get the rest of the change out of the pocket the shopkeeper will automatically take the fiver from me.

So what you are saying is once I have handed over the fiver I can pick up my item and just walk out because he has taken the fiver?

I don't think so pal.
NEtech

Well not really, if something costs £7.99 and I hand over a fiver before … Well not really, if something costs £7.99 and I hand over a fiver before I get the rest of the change out of the pocket the shopkeeper will automatically take the fiver from me.So what you are saying is once I have handed over the fiver I can pick up my item and just walk out because he has taken the fiver?I don't think so pal.



are you not bothering to read the rest of the thread and the conditions i have laid out? seems convenient..
but as you are so obviously blind-sided by this i shall spell it out the way the law interprets it.

1. the availability on a shelf of an item including a price constitutes an offer to sell
2. handing over the correct (priced) amount of money signals agreement.
3. acceptance of the cash, closes the deal, end of.

the way you want to play it is the retailer can change the amount he charges even after the money has been handed over.
maddogb

no mate just the law, money changes hands deal is done



A shop does NOT have to sell anything to you at the price displayed. It is purely at their discretion. Most large chains will honour the prices displayed but they are under no obligation to do so.
maddogb

are you not bothering to read the rest of the thread and the conditions i … are you not bothering to read the rest of the thread and the conditions i have laid out? seems convenient..but as you are so obviously blind-sided by this i shall spell it out the way the law interprets it.1. the availability on a shelf of an item including a price constitutes an offer to sell2. handing over the correct (priced) amount of money signals agreement.3. acceptance of the cash, closes the deal, end of.the way you want to play it is the retailer can change the amount he charges even after the money has been handed over.



you are incorrect the displayed price is only an " invitation to treat" in legal terms. it is you who makes the "offer" when you take the item to the till.

below taken from http://www.findlaw.co.uk/law/small_business/business_contracts/500564.html

"What then is an example of when an offer is not deemed to have been made? The key question would appear to be whether one party should be bound by his ‘offer’. This is essential for contract law as if an offer is deemed to have been accepted then it may well be that a contract has been formed. The courts therefore distinguish an offer from what is known as an ‘invitation to treat’ by objectively asking if the party intended to be bound by their statement.

A good example of when an invitation to treat is likely to be inferred by a court as opposed to an offer is if one party is merely hoping to commence negotiations. Therefore, the courts will always look at the language used or the inferred intention of the parties when deciding between an offer and an invitation to treat.
The classic example of an invitation to treat is when a shop owner puts a very low price on a product in the shop window. If you take the item to the counter the shopkeeper does not have to sell it to you. In strict legal terms it is you that makes the offer by offering to buy the product with your money. A shopkeeper who has mistakenly priced a product too cheaply is therefore not obliged to sell at that price.

An invitation to treat is a tool to get negotiations going and show the terms which one party may be willing to accept, as opposed to an offer in which one party is prepared to be legally bound by upon acceptance. "
Edited by: "bcp" 13th Jun 2014
NEtech

Well not really, if something costs £7.99 and I hand over a fiver before … Well not really, if something costs £7.99 and I hand over a fiver before I get the rest of the change out of the pocket the shopkeeper will automatically take the fiver from me.So what you are saying is once I have handed over the fiver I can pick up my item and just walk out because he has taken the fiver?I don't think so pal.

maddogb

next time go in with the right money and hand it to them, priced … next time go in with the right money and hand it to them, priced goods+right money handed over=sold!



Excuse me sir, don't come abrupt with me.

I did read the whole thread and the conditions you have laid out and here is what you said!



You see you did not say anything at all about the shopkeeper accepting the cash, you just said hand over the money. You can hand over anything you like but until the shopkeeper has agreed to the sale then you can't leave the shop with the goods.

Just handing over some money does not mean the deal is done. In the old days before barcode scanners when they used to use pricing guns, people would go in and swap over the prices just for a laugh. Now you can't tell me if someone put a 10p price on a £10 item that you could just walk up to the counter, hand the shopkeeper 10p and walk out because he has got the 10p in his hand and in your eyes he has accepted the sale.

You sir, are a buffoon.
ipswich78

A shop does NOT have to sell anything to you at the price displayed. It … A shop does NOT have to sell anything to you at the price displayed. It is purely at their discretion. Most large chains will honour the prices displayed but they are under no obligation to do so.



oh it does once you have handed over the money its priced at, not before, if the shop assistant spots the incorrect price they can refuse but once they have accepted the cash its too late, again read the above posts and take your blinkers off.
NEtech

Excuse me sir, don't come abrupt with me.I did read the whole thread and … Excuse me sir, don't come abrupt with me.I did read the whole thread and the conditions you have laid out and here is what you said!You see you did not say anything at all about the shopkeeper accepting the cash, you just said hand over the money. You can hand over anything you like but until the shopkeeper has agreed to the sale then you can't leave the shop with the goods. Just handing over some money does not mean the deal is done. In the old days before barcode scanners when they used to use pricing guns, people would go in and swap over the prices just for a laugh. Now you can't tell me if someone put a 10p price on a £10 item that you could just walk up to the counter, hand the shopkeeper 10p and walk out because he has got the 10p in his hand and in your eyes he has accepted the sale.You sir, are a buffoon.



prove me wrong then loudmouth.
maddogb

oh it does once you have handed over the money its priced at, not before, … oh it does once you have handed over the money its priced at, not before, if the shop assistant spots the incorrect price they can refuse but once they have accepted the cash its too late, again read the above posts and take your blinkers off.



'sigh' it's always a challenge when dealing with people like you. In your scenario above you are basically throwing your money at the cashier which would not be acceptable. IF the transaction is completed then yes it would be sold at that price.
ipswich78

'sigh' it's always a challenge when dealing with people like you. In your … 'sigh' it's always a challenge when dealing with people like you. In your scenario above you are basically throwing your money at the cashier which would not be acceptable. IF the transaction is completed then yes it would be sold at that price.



sigh, its always a challenge dealing with people like you! get a grip dude, just because someone says something different to the popular perception does not mean anything other than what it is.
As i said i have been there, i once saw a reasonably priced car stereo (£79.99) in dixons as it was then.
I asked to see the item, was handed it by the assistant, i had already taken the money from my wallet and after examining the item handed the money to the assistant.
As he entered the barcode at the till he saw it was a different price, nearly twice as much and he refused to sell it to me.
Miffed about this i asked for the name and phone number of the person next to me who had witnessed the event then went home and phoned trading standards who advised me as i have stated.
Trading standards advised me to contact the shop and inform them that i had the right to purchase the goods elsewhere and sue dixons for the difference. funnily enough the shop checked this with TS and then phoned me to come and collect the stereo.
Can't remember any extra details as this was a long time ago but from recent research things have not been changed legally.
maddogb

sigh, its always a challenge dealing with people like you! get a grip … sigh, its always a challenge dealing with people like you! get a grip dude, just because someone says something different to the popular perception does not mean anything other than what it is.As i said i have been there, i once saw a reasonably priced car stereo (£79.99) in dixons as it was then.I asked to see the item, was handed it by the assistant, i had already taken the money from my wallet and after examining the item handed the money to the assistant.As he entered the barcode at the till he saw it was a different price, nearly twice as much and he refused to sell it to me.Miffed about this i asked for the name and phone number of the person next to me who had witnessed the event then went home and phoned trading standards who advised me as i have stated.Trading standards advised me to contact the shop and inform them that i had the right to purchase the goods elsewhere and sue dixons for the difference. funnily enough the shop checked this with TS and then phoned me to come and collect the stereo.Can't remember any extra details as this was a long time ago but from recent research things have not been changed legally.



Cool 'story'... en.wikipedia.org/wik…eat
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