Can anyone please suggest a suitable 4K graphics card for HP ProLiant Gen8 MicroServer?

10
Found 2nd Mar 2016
I like to attach a 4K TV to Gen8 Microserver, so need a 4K graphics card. Could someone please recommend a good one? I couldn't find much online. TIA!

10 Comments

4K at 30 or 60Hz ?

To be honest I think you'll struggle, psu is pretty small so 4k output will be hard. What software are you running on server? Will the TV not take a dnla feed over ethernet?

Original Poster

Thanks for your answers Kester76 and enigmatik33.

I have not purchased the Microserver or TV yet. Like to do before the end of the month / cashback offer. I am trying to figure out what the best / working config can be. I have Gen7 machine with 1080p card and works perfect. Display card was recommended by someone here on HUKD, that it works well, before I purchased it.

So I have not idea about the Hz and I don't understand DLNA feed over ethernet.

My current 40' sony TV has ethernet port but no idea about the feed.

What do you mean by a '4k' graphics card? A card that can output 3840x2160? A card that can assist in decoding 4k videos? A card capable of gaming at 4k?

Dnla means the TV can access and play the files direct from the server, the server being accessed over the ethernet network connection between the two.

Original Poster

EndlessWaves

card output 3840x2160? assist in decoding 4k videos? gaming at 4k?



My Mobile (Samsung Note 3) recording 4K videos, so I would like to play it. YouTube has some 4K videos - increasingly more are being offered. I have 100 meg optic fibre to handle it. I don't play any games. I don't understand what decoding 4K video means but I can guess some processing needs to happen at graphic card level. Hope this roughly explains my requirement?

Last but ot least - I use my TV as PC monitor - surfing, browsing files, viewing spreadsheets, word documents etc - with 1080p it works really well. I am hoping with 4K, it should get better - if the OS - hardware, display cable, technology - everything is well aligned. I have read HDMI cables are unable to suppport 4K (unless cable is 2.0?). CPU processing requirements are high and so on.

Also read that if the PC works as DLNA or streaming server, it can handle playing 4K? But what is it, how it is set up? More questions at the moment. Novice stabbing in the dark!

Original Poster

enigmatik33

Dnla means the TV can access and play the files direct from the server, … Dnla means the TV can access and play the files direct from the server, the server being accessed over the ethernet network connection between the two.


Sounds promising. I will need to figure out if Gen8 microservers are at all the right choice for it. What OS is needed? How stable it all works - because I keep my microserver on practically all the time.

Look at open media vault OS

EndlessWaves

card output 3840x2160? assist in decoding 4k videos? gaming at 4k?

emmkay

Last but ot least - I use my TV as PC monitor - surfing, browsing files, … Last but ot least - I use my TV as PC monitor - surfing, browsing files, viewing spreadsheets, word documents etc - with 1080p it works really well. I am hoping with 4K, it should get better - if the OS - hardware, display cable, technology - everything is well aligned. I have read HDMI cables are unable to suppport 4K (unless cable is 2.0?). CPU processing requirements are high and so on.

emmkay

Also read that if the PC works as DLNA or streaming server, it can handle … Also read that if the PC works as DLNA or streaming server, it can handle playing 4K? But what is it, how it is set up? More questions at the moment. Novice stabbing in the dark!



Decoding is decompressing the video ready for playback, it's the most demanding step required for playing back a video which is why it's significant.

It's generally the job of the CPU but most recent video chips have included dedicated hardware to do it for common formats. As it's dedicated hardware for the purpose it uses less power and outputs less heat so it's great for your battery life.

Some of the earlier 4k sources used the H.264 format but a lot of them now seem to be going towards VP9 (youtube) and HEVC (everything else) which are newer and more efficient - but more demanding - formats.

Dedicated hardware support for them is partially implemented. The most complete implementation so far is nVidia's GM206 chip - the GTX 950 and GTX 960. Given the cost of that though it may be cheaper to buy a system with integrated graphics - the latest versions of which (Skylake/Excavator) are almost as good.



The version numbers apply to the devices rather than the cables. Effectively all cables support all versions. You do need either a DisplayPort 1.2 or HDMI 2.0 to output a 3840x2160 ('4k') picture at the normal 60hz refresh rate. Older versions do support a 30hz refresh rate suitable for many films (which are filmed at a slow refresh rate with lots of blur for historical/artistic reasons) but it'll feel less smooth/fluid than a normal screen.

As for resolution, computers and TVs have traditionally used resolutions differently. A computer keeps everything the same size as it was before and uses more pixels to provide more space while a TV increases the size of everything to fill the extra pixels.

4K is a big jump though and you need something with twice the diagonal at the same viewing distance to use it normally. Computers have been working on the ability to use TV-style scaling for fifteen years or more but until recently it's remained fairly niche. As such, you will find some programs won't support it and appear at a quarter of the size of everything else (assuming you use 200% scaling, which gives you the same amount of space as 1920x1080).

Very high resolution screens have been tried a couple of times before but it appears as if it may take off this time so I'd expect the numbers of such programs to decrease in future.



Video streaming is stuff like youtube. On your DLNA client (A Smart TV) you pick a video from another machine connected over the network (your home one instead of the internet) and it gets sent to you on the fly.

The actual playing happens on the TV, the PC is just transferring the files rather than playing them. This is a much less demanding job and can be done even with an old machine.

Original Poster

EndlessWaves

Detailed answer



Many thanks EndlessWaves for the details in your answer and thanks for the effort. I am genuinely obliged!!
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