Can I use a digital copy of receipt as proof of purchase?

21
Found 16th Jan 2015
Hi All
I wish to digitize my receipts in order to manage them more easily and dispose of the paper originals. If I have a problem with goods I have purchased or wish to get a refund/exchange, will retailers accept a photo of the original receipt on a smartphone?
Has anyone else done this with any success?

Cheers
Matt
Community Updates
AskDigital Copy
21 Comments
I cant see a problem with that ,all receipts are digitised by the retailer and printed out for you the consumer . As long as you have the relevant details -Order No - Price and item description etc it seems a sensible thing to do as long as you have secure ,backed up digital storage (and saves a lot of space .
I've printed and used a digital copy plenty of times.
I work for one of the BIG retailer and I will not accept any photocopy or picture/smartphone for an exchange or refund,
Yes they should accept it as it is a valid proof of purchase. Unfortunately you will often come across staff who will be problematic.
you will find it difficult to get a refund without the original receipt best you can hope for is a credit note.
thanks for the responses folks.

Looks like a split decision on this one :-)

I'll play safe for now and keep paper receipts. Shame, because thermal printed receipts fade easily and details are lost.

I bet if a criminal conviction rested on evidence of a photograph of a receipt it would be good enough LOL

Cheers
Matt
simonastell

I work for one of the BIG retailer and I will not accept any photocopy or … I work for one of the BIG retailer and I will not accept any photocopy or picture/smartphone for an exchange or refund,



Then you're not interpreting the law correctly and your employer needs to educate you on the sale of goods act. The sale of goods act is very simple. Proof of purchase is not necessarily the original copy of a sales contract. Proof of purchase is just that - proof that the item was purchased. It could be in the form of a bank statement, correspondence between both parties which proves a sale took place, or a reliable record showing the sale took place.

Source: My degree.
Rab88

Then you're not interpreting the law correctly and your employer needs to … Then you're not interpreting the law correctly and your employer needs to educate you on the sale of goods act. The sale of goods act is very simple. Proof of purchase is not necessarily the original copy of a sales contract. Proof of purchase is just that - proof that the item was purchased. It could be in the form of a bank statement, correspondence between both parties which proves a sale took place, or a reliable record showing the sale took place. Source: My degree.



"Your degree" did not source your assertion. The retailer is within their rights to require proof of purchase in an original unaltered format - an original receipt, an original bank statement, an original correspondence between the parties. They aren't obliged to accept copies. Some retailers may choose to accept copies, others may not - that is not unlawful.
Rab88

Then you're not interpreting the law correctly and your employer needs to … Then you're not interpreting the law correctly and your employer needs to educate you on the sale of goods act. The sale of goods act is very simple. Proof of purchase is not necessarily the original copy of a sales contract. Proof of purchase is just that - proof that the item was purchased. It could be in the form of a bank statement, correspondence between both parties which proves a sale took place, or a reliable record showing the sale took place. Source: My degree.



you need to get another degree. there is no proof that the non-original receipt can not be altered or tampered with. in these days of technology, it is possible to alter digital copies.

digital copies will only be accepted if it can be proved together with other sources to ensure that no details have been tampered with, for example you bought online so there is an independent record of the purchase or you a clear purchase deduction (with name of retailer) from your bank statement or credit card. even then you could alter the item purchased but they would be able to check this with their database.
ceres

"Your degree" did not source your assertion. The retailer is within … "Your degree" did not source your assertion. The retailer is within their rights to require proof of purchase in an original unaltered format - an original receipt, an original bank statement, an original correspondence between the parties. They aren't obliged to accept copies. Some retailers may choose to accept copies, others may not - that is not unlawful.



What you have to look at is what would stand up in court of proof of purchase. That is the term here - proof that the item was purchased. A photocopy of a contract of sale is sufficient proof that an item was purchased, whether the original contract of sale is present or not. A simple good search will show this through examples orlf previous cases which have made it to court.

The answer is yes, a photo or digital copy is enough, regardless of the stance of any "big" retailers. In actual fact you'll find it's the stance of an over zealous and under-trained customer service advisor, as the retailers themselves, whether they admit it or not, will already know this at
The problem with a digital copy is even if you had returned the item you would still have proof. Many places take the receipt and stamp it of take it and print you a refund receipt.

What a court would accept and what a retailer will accept are two different things.
GAVINLEWISHUKD

The problem with a digital copy is even if you had returned the item you … The problem with a digital copy is even if you had returned the item you would still have proof. Many places take the receipt and stamp it of take it and print you a refund receipt. What a court would accept and what a retailer will accept are two different things.


Then the retailer are not interpreting the law correctly. And as I've said already, unfortunately the person representing the retailer isn't always aware of the law. The law takes precedence, not the retailer's own policies or the customer service advisors lack of knowledge of the law.

A google search will answer all your queries and show you exactly what "proof of purchase" is. Or even have a look on a more reliable forum for these type of questions such as the consumer action group who will confirm what I've said.
Rab88

Then the retailer are not interpreting the law correctly. And as I've … Then the retailer are not interpreting the law correctly. And as I've said already, unfortunately the person representing the retailer isn't always aware of the law. The law takes precedence, not the retailer's own policies or the customer service advisors lack of knowledge of the law. A google search will answer all your queries and show you exactly what "proof of purchase" is. Or even have a look on a more reliable forum for these type of questions such as the consumer action group who will confirm what I've said.



Who was disputing the fact? Nobody! I don't want to go to court every time I want to return something!

Most places say 'A valid receipt' is required so thats what I supply. Many places will refund you even if you don't want a product even though they are not required by law.

GAVINLEWISHUKD

Who was disputing the fact? Nobody! I don't want to go to court every … Who was disputing the fact? Nobody! I don't want to go to court every time I want to return something!Most places say 'A valid receipt' is required so thats what I supply. Many places will refund you even if you don't want a product even though they are not required by law.


The reality is that it wouldn't go to court if you did have a photocopy, as somewhere in the retailers organisation someone will be aware of the customer's rights - the reason I'm referring to what happens in a court is that it should reflect what happens at the retailer. Often it will, if you know the facts as a consumer, you know your rights, and the person you are speaking to knows the law. Whether that be the first point of contact customer service advisor or higher up the retailers organisation.
Rab88

What you have to look at is what would stand up in court of proof of … What you have to look at is what would stand up in court of proof of purchase. That is the term here - proof that the item was purchased. A photocopy of a contract of sale is sufficient proof that an item was purchased, whether the original contract of sale is present or not. A simple good search will show this through examples orlf previous cases which have made it to court.The answer is yes, a photo or digital copy is enough, regardless of the stance of any "big" retailers. In actual fact you'll find it's the stance of an over zealous and under-trained customer service advisor, as the retailers themselves, whether they admit it or not, will already know this at



Lol. A google lawyer. Retailers are not obliged to accept digital copy proof of purchase.
ceres

Lol. A google lawyer. Retailers are not obliged to accept digital copy … Lol. A google lawyer. Retailers are not obliged to accept digital copy proof of purchase.



Not a lawyer, and I don't rely on google for my answers in this case. I'm relying on my own education and experience. Regardless, google still points to all the correct answers, as does citizens advice, numerous consumer forums etc. if you want to have a look for yourself. The facts are, whether you like or not, that a copy of the receipt is "proof of purchase". And that, legally ( because that's what matters) is all that's required.

This disagreement will continue to go back and forth on here. All the OP has to do is satisfy himself by referring to websites/forums where people who have knowlege in this frequent in order to back up what I have said. Because as it appears, some of you have no knowledge of consumer law and are giving the wrong information.
Rab88

Not a lawyer, and I don't rely on google for my answers in this case. I'm … Not a lawyer, and I don't rely on google for my answers in this case. I'm relying on my own education and experience. Regardless, google still points to all the correct answers, as does citizens advice, numerous consumer forums etc. if you want to have a look for yourself. The facts are, whether you like or not, that a copy of the receipt is "proof of purchase". And that, legally ( because that's what matters) is all that's required. This disagreement will continue to go back and forth on here. All the OP has to do is satisfy himself by referring to websites/forums where people who have knowlege in this frequent in order to back up what I have said. Because as it appears, some of you have no knowledge of consumer law and are giving the wrong information.



I'm with Rab88 on this one, just because some front line staff in a retail outlet wouldn't accept a digital copy of a receipt doesn't make his information wrong. Unfortunately they don't necessarily know the ins and outs of such protocol and it might not be 'encouraged' by retailers to accept this type of proof of postage.

However, in reality if you had a digital copy of a receipt and wanted to take it further as soon as you got to someone with a 'little' knowledge you would be okay.
Edited by: "ipswich78" 17th Jan 2015
ipswich78

I'm with Rab88 on this one, just because some front line staff in a … I'm with Rab88 on this one, just because some front line staff in a retail outlet wouldn't accept a digital copy of a receipt doesn't make his information wrong. Unfortunately they don't necessarily know the ins and outs of such protocol and it might not be 'encouraged' by retailers to accept this type of proof of postage.However, in reality if you had a digital copy of a receipt and wanted to take it further as soon as you got to someone with a 'little' knowledge you would be okay.



you probably can get a refund if you are prepared to make a complaint then go to court etc to prove your case. this is too much hassle so moral of the story is, keep life simple and keep the bloody paper receipt, not asking too much is it? oO
mutley1

you probably can get a refund if you are prepared to make a complaint … you probably can get a refund if you are prepared to make a complaint then go to court etc to prove your case. this is too much hassle so moral of the story is, keep life simple and keep the bloody paper receipt, not asking too much is it? oO



Nah most places you'll be fine, it's only when you get a jobsworth you'll have problems.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants