Cats, kids and germs?

13
Posted 14th Jan
Hi,

I have owned a cat for three weeks. She is approx 2 years old. I’m still yet to get her spayed, but we had doubt whether she’s pregnant hence the delay. She’s an outdoor cat.

I suffer sometimes from OCD, and I’m constantly worried in the back of my head about germs/viruses.
I’m moreso worried my 1 year old son collecting germs/virus from the cat. He sometimes tries to feed her, pet her etc. The cats saliva remains on his hands and he then puts his fingers in his mouth and eats his food etc. It gets tiring always having to keep an eye out and wash his hands.

For me as an adult it’s easy to just wash my hands. But my son in the background is handling the cat and constantly putting his fingers in his mouth.

Is there much to worry about? Have there been know instances where children have become unwell from cats?

Many thanks
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I’m more concerned that if we say yes it’s possible although unlikely to get ill from a disease passed on from your cat , what happens to the poor cat ? If you know you have OCD around these issues , maybe more thought should have gone into taking a pet on . Sorry if that sounds harsh , but this is obviously not the cats first home if she is 2 years old and you have only had her for 3 weeks . No cat rehoming charity I know rehomes cats that are not neutered so I’m wondering how this situation has occurred?

Is this cat truly an outside cat [ eg feral and you just feed it ) or just has access to the outside ? Feral cats are more likely to scratch and bite and pass infection on this way . More likelihood of infection if a child plays with a litter tray by mistake if you have one , so I would suggest a covered one, looks less like a sand pit to a toddler.

Has the cat has flea and worm treatment , flea bites are nasty if you are allergic to them , and can become infected .
Cats are the cleanest animal you can find, they're always licking themselves clean, try and find an instance of a baby or adult getting an infection from a cat, it'll be a long Search (different from a scram or a bite)
Edited by: "esar" 14th Jan
13 Comments
Personally I wouldn't have got an outside cat
If she's a rehomed and unneutered, I'm surprised she lets your son anywhere near her.

Personally I would get her straight to a vet for neutering and then vaccinating together with worm and flea treatments. Should she be expecting kittens they will be able to tell and take the necessary action. Once done she will have to be kept in for a while and that will be an issue with a litter tray and poo.
JimboParrot14/01/2020 14:07

If she's a rehomed and unneutered, I'm surprised she lets your son …If she's a rehomed and unneutered, I'm surprised she lets your son anywhere near her.Personally I would get her straight to a vet for neutering and then vaccinating together with worm and flea treatments. Should she be expecting kittens they will be able to tell and take the necessary action. Once done she will have to be kept in for a while and that will be an issue with a litter tray and poo.


May I ask why she wouldn’t let my son near her? She’s very gentle. But If I’m honest the history in this cat is poor. She’s meant to be a street cat, but she seems so gentle? Also it doesn’t seem as though she has ever given kittens. But I have noticed heat cycle behaviour?
I’m more concerned that if we say yes it’s possible although unlikely to get ill from a disease passed on from your cat , what happens to the poor cat ? If you know you have OCD around these issues , maybe more thought should have gone into taking a pet on . Sorry if that sounds harsh , but this is obviously not the cats first home if she is 2 years old and you have only had her for 3 weeks . No cat rehoming charity I know rehomes cats that are not neutered so I’m wondering how this situation has occurred?

Is this cat truly an outside cat [ eg feral and you just feed it ) or just has access to the outside ? Feral cats are more likely to scratch and bite and pass infection on this way . More likelihood of infection if a child plays with a litter tray by mistake if you have one , so I would suggest a covered one, looks less like a sand pit to a toddler.

Has the cat has flea and worm treatment , flea bites are nasty if you are allergic to them , and can become infected .
Just take the cat to a vets to get inoculated and the snip ask any questions you have they will put your mind at rest.
How did you obtain the cat? If not from a shelter then..

1) You dont "own" a cat, you are looking after it (the cat owns you now really anyway).
2) Take the cat straight to a vet to ensure she isn't already chipped and some poor family could be having sleepless nights over her
3) Get the cat microchipped if it isn't already.
4) Have a healthcheck ASAP.
5) The cat could have worms etc. The cat needs treatment to ensure that this is not the case, else it is probably passing it to your child.
6) Do some proper online research, or ask your vet for advice. Looking after a cat is a big responsibility but can easily be managed.
7) Well done so far. Enjoy the future together.
expandingmaan14/01/2020 14:18

May I ask why she wouldn’t let my son near her? She’s very gentle. But If I …May I ask why she wouldn’t let my son near her? She’s very gentle. But If I’m honest the history in this cat is poor. She’s meant to be a street cat, but she seems so gentle? Also it doesn’t seem as though she has ever given kittens. But I have noticed heat cycle behaviour?


It is quite unusual for cats to even stay in a room where there are babies or young children they usually head straight for the door as soon as they hear them. She could be someone's pet (depends how you acquired her) who is used to youngsters.
Nothing to worry about. It's much harder for diseases to pass between species so most of the illnesses he'll pick up will be from other humans, not pets.
Cats are the cleanest animal you can find, they're always licking themselves clean, try and find an instance of a baby or adult getting an infection from a cat, it'll be a long Search (different from a scram or a bite)
Edited by: "esar" 14th Jan
If you're thinking like that you shouldn't have got a cat. Sorry if it sounds harsh but it's true. If you are that worried about germs on your kids then you'll regret it in later life when your kids are always poorly because they'll have really bad immune systems.
Edited by: "MonkeyMan90" 14th Jan
I have toxoplasmosis, I own two cats and would recommended watching this video.
Maybe you should try a Speakmans seminar, very uplifting.
I highly doubt you have o.c.d
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