Cavity wall insulation

16
Found 12th Dec 2017
Hi guys, anyone know how i can find out when my walls were insulated? it was done before I moved in about 12yrs ago.
I've got really bad damp on my walls
thanks
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Your solicitor will have asked questions about any guarantees as part of the Enquiries process and handed any written warranty to you in a documentation pack.

Your surveyor will have noted any signs of the work (cement or plastic plugs in exterior walls etc) and listed the details in the survey report.

Unless its a new build, Cavity wall doesn't require Building Regs.

After market Cavity wall firms tend to go out of business every few years as problems like yours crop up.
Thanks. I've not got anything to reference the cavity wall maybe I could contact the solicitors who handled the sale. It's an old council house so I was wondering if the council paid to have it done before I bought it off the previous owner.
damp on the inside of external walls is most likely to be condensation. Are you drying clothes inside? keeping heating on? ventillation?
mas9927 m ago

damp on the inside of external walls is most likely to be condensation. …damp on the inside of external walls is most likely to be condensation. Are you drying clothes inside? keeping heating on? ventillation?


This - however, sometimes you can get what are known as cold spots on walls with cavity wall insulation. This is caused by what is known as 'bridging' - this is when masonery is jamned in between both the bricks on inner and outer course.
mas9933 m ago

damp on the inside of external walls is most likely to be condensation. …damp on the inside of external walls is most likely to be condensation. Are you drying clothes inside? keeping heating on? ventillation?



You must work in the industry to make a blatantly cobblers statement like that.



This article may be useful but its not good news askjeff.co.uk/cav…ill

Yes, contacting the solicitor may be quicker than asking the council unless you can get your local councillor to send in the request (then the lackys get very excited and responsive. As a member of the public, you will be at the back of the queue)
Thanks everyone
Ok, the solicitors I used went bankrupt back in 2008. Doesn't leave me much apart from trying the council now.
richje1001 h, 25 m ago

Thanks. I've not got anything to reference the cavity wall maybe I could …Thanks. I've not got anything to reference the cavity wall maybe I could contact the solicitors who handled the sale. It's an old council house so I was wondering if the council paid to have it done before I bought it off the previous owner.



If council house, then best bet would be to contact them, they would have had/have a contract with the company who carried out the work.
However, depending on council area, it could have been done a long time ago. Therefore hard to determine who done the work, or if still covered.
ccnp46 m ago

You must work in the industry to make a blatantly cobblers statement like …You must work in the industry to make a blatantly cobblers statement like that. This article may be useful but its not good news http://www.askjeff.co.uk/cavity-wall-fillYes, contacting the solicitor may be quicker than asking the council unless you can get your local councillor to send in the request (then the lackys get very excited and responsive. As a member of the public, you will be at the back of the queue)



Nah.
If I was in the industry I'd be recommending immediate expensive things like damp proofing or knocking holes in the walls to remove insulation (may as well replace those wall ties while we're at it?)

Ideally the OP should tell us where abouts the damp is happening (upstairs/downstairs/corners/near windows/etc) and if they have checked gutters/ground levels.

Damp cavities (insert frankie howard pic for older members) will tend to be due to issues with the roof/gutters or strong winds and penetrating rain onto poor condition walls.

Damp and mold on walls is almost always down to condensation - especially given the recent cold weather - how you come to think that this is "cobblers" I have no idea?

Personally I would recommend external EPS insulation but it isn't always a simple install - depends on detailing and rooflines/eves. And the trade in the uk still regard this as exotic so try on stupid prices.
House is semi detached and damp is in the bedroom in the corners of the outside wall. I keep having to re paper the room every year because it peels away. I also have a few spots on the ceiling just from the coving on the same side. Just realised aswell there used to be a window in the wall which they bricked up, inwonder if that's anything to do with the damp. I use those aero tablets which fill up pretty quick so maybe it is a circulation problem rather than the insulation failing/causing the issue?
So this happens in the colder months? Really sounds like condensation to me.

warm damp air in the house meeting cold walls. If you touch the walls where the condensation is I bet it feels very cold.
The 'fix' is to either reduce the amount of moisture in the air (airflow/vents/extractors) or raise the temperature (heating and/or insulation) so that moisture doesnt condense.

What sort of heating and ventilation do you have? Are you drying clothes inside? How are you getting rid of the steam from showers and cooking?

Some people like PIV systems (which pump air into the house continually ) - I'd prefer MHRV with heat exchangers although it depends a bit on how airtight the house is and you want insulation with both.
Exactly what mas99 says. You can buy very cheap humidity testers. You may just be surprised how much moisture can be in the air before you make your very own cloud!
Have you checked any guttering or downpipes that may be leaking/blockedand causing the problems.
I agree most likely condensation problem. The areas affected will be the coldest points in the wall!

Steps are firstly try to reduce amount of water vapour in the house.

1/ Don't dry clothes on radiators
2/ Always have extractors (venting externally) on in the kitchen when cooking and bathroom when bathing/showering
3/ Only dry hair in warm rooms

Then purchase a cheap dehumidifier. Can often be found for £30-£40 on ebay/gumtree - you will be amazed how much water is removed.
Great advice guys thank you. I do think it may be a condensation issue. No vent in the kitchen which is underneath the bedroom so could be the culprit. Clothes are dried in a tumble which is extracted outside. I'll look at dehumidifiers
Also it may help if you can add more insulation to the loft.
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