Combi Boiler help

21
Found 6th Sep 2011
Hi,

I have been to view a few property and shortlist a few, and one of them raised my concerns and I need some expert advice.

They have relocated their combi boiler to the garden, and have build a wooden cupboard to shield it from the open. I am just concerned of the following;
1. Is it safe to have a combi boiler outside
2. if safe, than would that not take twice as much energy to heat up assuming it the cold outside would take the heat away.
3. if water in the pipes iced up in the winter, would that not damage it or cause overheating or some sort?

I have tried calling some companies, but at this time, they only interest in getting work.

Thanks in advance.
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21 Comments
Have you asked the agent/vendor?

Ring a plumber? Sounds odd to me
Edited by: "sancho1983" 6th Sep 2011
Not that im a plumber... but that sounds pretty bizzare to me !! A boiler in the garden... have they got the cooker out there as well ??

Odd
When you say "in a cupboard", what do you mean? Is the boiler on an external wall of the main building?

Are the pipes open to the elements?
Sounds like a strange setup to me. The boiler will probably have anti-frost protection but it will be firing up all the time out there. Can't say I would be happy with that.
Sounds weird.

You would need to ask them for certification of the installation from the engineer that installed it - as long as he was registered with the relevant body when it was installed (either Corgi or more recently Gas Safe) it would be deemed safe I guess.

As for the other issues, you'd think it would be more prone to icing, unless the pipework heading in all directions is heavily insulated. The heat exchanger where your water is heated up, is relatively enclosed unit that shouldn't have any particular issues with being outside.
As long as it's weathered properly it's not a problem. On a previous house (1 bedroom), I put our combi in the broom cupboard outside the front door. It's difficult to say without a picture, but if you mean "garden" as on the outside wall which is then enclosed in, no problem
The boiler is in the white box. Its built from wood. I can only assume for now that it was mounted to the neighbours extention, and then boxed up. I say its a cupboard type, but its more of a shed type built.

As for the installation, I remember the vendor saying that he done it himself as he was given this combi boiler from a member of his family.

http://media.rightmove.co.uk/6k/5609/19723584/5609_1782798_IMG_04_0000_max_620x414.jpg

I didnt really think it was an issue, until todays cold weather!
This is all the information I can provide until 2nd viewing on Saturday.

Check list I will be doing is;
1. Certificate if any,
2. Are pipes exposed
3. Is the cupboard / shed type box weather proof?
(is there anymore I need to add to this?)

I think my main concern is really the cost, I assuming it be a sufficiant if the boiler is inside?

Many Thanks
Edited by: "thir13en" 6th Sep 2011
Looks dodgy, also any gas appliance should be installed by a 'gas safe' registered fitter. Tbh I wouldn't go near that with a barge pole.

If this is not the case and in the future should you have any gas related home insurance claim, the underwriter will refuse to pay out if he finds out a trained chimp did the installation.
I would assume he is qualified as fitting or relocating a boiler is pretty technical?
You can can get purpose built external boilers that have metal casing around them and are perfectly fine outside s long as they have frost thermostats fitted

Standard boilers that are moved outside are not a good idea and if they have wooden casing built around them they will contravene oftec or gas safe regulations

I've seen a lot of this in my job, some people really don't have a clue and shouldn't be allowed near boilers

where does the flue exit the bolier by the way? Please tell me it doesn't go through the wood
Edited by: "souljacker" 6th Sep 2011
ermmm... the pipe is thru the wood.
Not sure if you can see it clearly, but there is a wire protection around the flue exit. If you look hard you just see it above the blue barrel.
looking at the picture , at first I thought they had put the combi in the wendy house , but no , they wern't that daft then.
my advice run for the hills and never go back! It has DODGY written all over it!

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6196/6122336788_4f162e1949.jpg
I don't see a problem with it.
If you do decide to go ahead, you can tell the vendor that you want him to get a landlords safety certificate.
If you are happy about all other aspects of the property then dont let the bolier issue be a deal breaker.
Boilers can be relocated. Yes costs are involved. But if you have fell in love with this property usually such things can be worked out.

If however you have other reservations, then it maybe the issue that helps to decide to select another property.
The only genuine issue I see is the fact it's installed on the neighbour's extension. Extensions arent allowed to be built on the boundary line and therefore this shed thing by being attached to it will fall on their land. If you get on with your neighbour, fine, but fall out and they can force you to remove it.
pinkleponkle

The only genuine issue I see is the fact it's installed on the … The only genuine issue I see is the fact it's installed on the neighbour's extension.



That fact is actually an assumption.
No it's a fact, the extension if legal has to have a gap between the edge of the boundary to the edge of the brickwork. Unless you mean there are other genuine reasons, which may be true as we can't see inside the shed.
pinkleponkle

No it's a fact, the extension if legal has to have a gap between the edge … No it's a fact, the extension if legal has to have a gap between the edge of the boundary to the edge of the brickwork. Unless you mean there are other genuine reasons, which may be true as we can't see inside the shed.



No, it's an assumption that it is on a neighbours wall, which is why I only quoted that sentence.
Thanks you all, will have more information on Saturday.
If memory serves me right, then their other neighbour has no wall and is wooden fencing.

looks like a few 100's to move the boiler
Just went to see it again. The wall where the flue exits is actually concrete wall. and the rest is wood. Boiler was done as part of the government scheme so it should be sound, its just a standard boiler, and i can see some pipes are insulated so thats sound, but the roof structure was pretty poor. I can see the actual tiles in the loft and light coming thru oh well.

Many thanks to you all.
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