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Condensation on skylight

13
Found 3rd Oct 2013
I’ve recently moved into a new house and noticed that there is a lot of condensation dripping down from the skylight and the wooden frame surrounding it at the base is starting to warp from the dampness.

Does anyone have any advice on how to stop this? I read somewhere about something called a condensation channel, that is designed to sit at the bottom of the window and capture any water drops and hold them. Letting them evaporate without dripping down onto the wooden frame. The issue is I can’t find anywhere in the UK that stocks this, does this actually exist or does it go under a different name?
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The problem is probably not enough ventilation in the room,the dampness in the air is hitting the coldest part of the room and causing condensation,are there any air bricks outside that have been blocked up? you may need to add an extractor fan or even an air brick somewhere within the room,is it a down stairs room or up stairs??
mycatcanripyourfaceoff

The problem is probably not enough ventilation in the room,the dampness … The problem is probably not enough ventilation in the room,the dampness in the air is hitting the coldest part of the room and causing condensation,are there any air bricks outside that have been blocked up? you may need to add an extractor fan or even an air brick somewhere within the room,is it a down stairs room or up stairs??



The window is located on the upper landing. I'm not sure about air bricks, the property is over 100 years old and made of stone.

Isn't there something designed to capture the water?

I know if I put the heating on this would solve it, but I'm refusing to do so until it's very cold.
I don't know about something to capture the water,but maybe double glazing it would be a solution,if you can't afford that,we used to use a plastic film that you tape to the frame and then tighten up with a hair dryer,this stops condensation developing on the window,cheap and cheerful and really works.
mycatcanripyourfaceoff

I don't know about something to capture the water,but maybe double … I don't know about something to capture the water,but maybe double glazing it would be a solution,if you can't afford that,we used to use a plastic film that you tape to the frame and then tighten up with a hair dryer,this stops condensation developing on the window,cheap and cheerful and really works.



Thanks, this sounds like a good solution. Double glazing is out of the question this year for that window, but maybe in the future.
redarrowrules

The window is located on the upper landing. I'm not sure about air … The window is located on the upper landing. I'm not sure about air bricks, the property is over 100 years old and made of stone.Isn't there something designed to capture the water?I know if I put the heating on this would solve it, but I'm refusing to do so until it's very cold.



Would heating not not create more condensation? i believe it is created by cold outside and warm inside (or vice versa) so heating one side of the window whilst cold outside will create more ??
Condensation happens when the one side of glass is a lot warmer then the other and the traped air condenses on the inside glass. You simply need to increase the airflow around the window. Often this is as simple as leaving the curtains open when you go to bed. You could also leave the window slightly open. Other methods would have a cost.
Don't confuse this with condensation with double glazing. The is no cure for that other then replacing the unit because the air that's condensing is trapped between the two panes of glass so you can't improve the airflow at all.
It has no curtains, nor does it open. So there is no real practical way of increasing the airflow around the window.

Placing a fan near it too would be difficult due to the height it’s at and that the fan would have to be on the stairs. So without replacing the entire window the only thing I can try it seems is the plastic film suggested earlier. Or I could try and create something to capture the water.

I’m not bothered about the condensation itself, it’s the effect it’s having on the frame at the base.


Edited by: "redarrowrules" 3rd Oct 2013
Could you try a dehumidifier to help with it.
Poppyj1

Could you try a dehumidifier to help with it.


Poppy's right a dehumidifier will help a lot, especially if your drying clothes inside on an airier
LtfdTony

Poppy's right a dehumidifier will help a lot, especially if your drying … Poppy's right a dehumidifier will help a lot, especially if your drying clothes inside on an airier



How well would one work if it would be about 2m below the window on a landing? I don't know the m square footage of the hall, but it's your average sized one. Just worried due to the volume of air this wouldn't really do much.

Also are they expensive to run?
Then you need to get a vent put in the glass or the window frame. Just collecting the water is an easy option but not long term because the damp around the window could give other problems not least mould, wallpaper can peel and it can became rather unhealthy.
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