Condensation patches after cooking moist food

17
Posted 19th Oct
I live in a mid terraced house. The kitchen cooker has a extracter fan but it's on a internal wall so doesn't extract the air out the room/house.

When we boil potatoes/ open the oven after moist food etc there's a few patches in the corner of the kitchen that get condensation on them and a few patches on the wall in the front room right near it. They nearly vanish a few hours later.

I am going to strip the paint, use salt neutraliser, maybe condensation paint but after that would a dehumidifier or air purifier work? As I can't get a outside extractor.

I hope that makes sense

Thanks3311996.jpg The picture is just after cooking so that is it when it's "wet" its dry after just with the lifted paint still there and no patches
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17 Comments
Dehumidifier would help - air purifier not.
You get condensation because warm damp air is meeting a cold surface - so if specific area then why is that bit colder than the rest. A damp wall will be colder.
Not sure from your pic exaxtly what I'm looking at iin relation to rooms/outside.
Thanks. Sorry that picture is in the kitchen. This is the same area when we're not cooking. Rain dosent make the wall worse for penetrating damp but it's a internal wall with the neighbours
38703720-iBZSd.jpg
What is the point of an extractor that doesn't extract? Can you not duct it outside? That would be the most efficient resolution.
I dident design the kitchen, the cooker is in the middle of one wall and the other wall dosent have any upper units to hide it
Don't have a clue what condensation paint is lmao.
Person above is correct about condensation and yeah it is odd how it is only a couple of patches as if there is a specific reason behind the face of the wall why that is a cold spot.
For example, if it was an external wall, maybe part of your render has fallen off outside and the cold has access to those spots. But if it's internal then who knows.
I would scrape it off and repaint the full wall with either an acrylic eggshell, silk or soft sheen emulsion as they are all more durable towards moisture and wipeable.
Dehumidifier should help the problem but it's very odd like I said why it isn't a large patch but small individual ones.

It could also be efflorescence if it is a plastered wall rather than damp as it isn't going black which steers me away from dampness.
Edited by: "Cloeeez" 20th Oct
Boil potatoes with a lid on
Install a vent/extractor in the outside wall, doesn’t have to be linked to the cooker and will solve your issue.


screwfix.com/p/m…2GY
Edited by: "cmdr_elito" 20th Oct
get a fan to circulate the air , and open some windows , especially THE TOP vents , steam rises and needs to get out .
Some sort of ex-tractor sounds like a great idea... All cooking emits steam really
.
N.B. It is very difficult to find lidded potatoes ..
Thanks peeps. We have borrowed a dehumidifier to test in the kitchen. Our house is a nightmare. The old owners had a conservatory built so any extractor fan would be on that wall, the cooker is in the worst place possible.
Cloeeez20/10/2019 00:47

Don't have a clue what condensation paint is lmao.Person above is correct …Don't have a clue what condensation paint is lmao.Person above is correct about condensation and yeah it is odd how it is only a couple of patches as if there is a specific reason behind the face of the wall why that is a cold spot.For example, if it was an external wall, maybe part of your render has fallen off outside and the cold has access to those spots. But if it's internal then who knows.I would scrape it off and repaint the full wall with either an acrylic eggshell, silk or soft sheen emulsion as they are all more durable towards moisture and wipeable.Dehumidifier should help the problem but it's very odd like I said why it isn't a large patch but small individual ones.It could also be efflorescence if it is a plastered wall rather than damp as it isn't going black which steers me away from dampness.


Thanks. I think it's the mix from the plaster and possibly efflorescence, the walls were tanked about 2 years ago higher than where its coming through
fitzyfitz2920/10/2019 13:39

Thanks. I think it's the mix from the plaster and possibly efflorescence, …Thanks. I think it's the mix from the plaster and possibly efflorescence, the walls were tanked about 2 years ago higher than where its coming through


No problem Part of my job to try problem solve stuff like this haha.
If it is efflorescence, scrape the parts that are 'burst' off and brush them with a heavy duty brush like a wire brush.
I'm sure you can get some kind of 'cleaner' specifically to treat it but I've never used any. I've always just scraped it off, wire brushed it then either filled it with filler to make the part i've scraped off flush with the rest of the wall then/or just coated it with Acrylic Eggshell which is the one of the best paints for kitchens/bathrooms and to go over this kind of problem.
Don't wash it down or anything because that adds to the problem, the moisture drags out the salt from the plaster thus creating efflorescence.
Edited by: "Cloeeez" 20th Oct
The extractor fan needs vented to an exterior wall, I mean where the hell is that that greasy steam being extracted too? No dehumidifier or amount of paint is going to solve this problem, is there not a real "foody" smell in your house?
Donkii21/10/2019 11:51

The extractor fan needs vented to an exterior wall, I mean where the hell …The extractor fan needs vented to an exterior wall, I mean where the hell is that that greasy steam being extracted too? No dehumidifier or amount of paint is going to solve this problem, is there not a real "foody" smell in your house?


The OP has already explained that on the exterior wall there is a connected conservatory and judging by their wording, they don't already have an existing fan which would mean a fan install which could cost judging by google £300. And they'd be putting that 'greasy steam' into their conservatory. So unless OP wants to remove said conservatory and then get a fan installed, what others have advised with the dehumids etc is probably best at first to see if that fixes the problem.
Cloeeez21/10/2019 12:01

The OP has already explained that on the exterior wall there is a …The OP has already explained that on the exterior wall there is a connected conservatory and judging by their wording, they don't already have an existing fan which would mean a fan install which could cost judging by google £300. And they'd be putting that 'greasy steam' into their conservatory. So unless OP wants to remove said conservatory and then get a fan installed, what others have advised with the dehumids etc is probably best at first to see if that fixes the problem.


A dehumidifier wont help with the amount of steam caused buy cooking, it will all be money wasted, the "greasy steam" is very greasy and dirty (just look at the build up in an extractor fans filters). There will be somewhere to place an exterior vent, hell a better fix would be to get some plastic extractor piping and feed it out the window while cooking.
Donkii21/10/2019 12:08

A dehumidifier wont help with the amount of steam caused buy cooking, it …A dehumidifier wont help with the amount of steam caused buy cooking, it will all be money wasted, the "greasy steam" is very greasy and dirty (just look at the build up in an extractor fans filters). There will be somewhere to place an exterior vent, hell a better fix would be to get some plastic extractor piping and feed it out the window while cooking.


Like I said, assuming OP can't do any of this work themselves, they should try what others have suggested before having to give tradespeople money, for afterall - a bit of paint crumbling off...
Donkii21/10/2019 12:08

A dehumidifier wont help with the amount of steam caused buy cooking, it …A dehumidifier wont help with the amount of steam caused buy cooking, it will all be money wasted, the "greasy steam" is very greasy and dirty (just look at the build up in an extractor fans filters). There will be somewhere to place an exterior vent, hell a better fix would be to get some plastic extractor piping and feed it out the window while cooking.


Here's a perfectly viable alternative. Window extractor
Cloeeez21/10/2019 12:16

Like I said, assuming OP can't do any of this work themselves, they should …Like I said, assuming OP can't do any of this work themselves, they should try what others have suggested before having to give tradespeople money, for afterall - a bit of paint crumbling off...


So far using this dehumidifier has stopped the patches looking wet during cooking. Only been putting it on before we cook and leave it 30 mins / an hour after.

I'm going to do your advise with the patches though, going to do behind the kitchen door first as practise as it's hidden if it looks bad
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