Consumer rights.

Was doing some research on this and thought if share points with everyone.

The whole " you have 30 days to return thing" is a load of tosh, if there is a fault then you have 5 years from the day you notice the fault to return that item.

If the shop says all they can give you is a credit note then this is lies, you are entitled to your money back.

You do not need a receipt to return an item as it is not the law to give one you may however need a proof of purchase eg bank statment with the value of money

9 Comments

Banned

12 months is the manufacturers warranty, though items are expected to last a reasonable amount of time (the time limit is not set in law) so if an item fails after the 12 month warranty you can still ask them to fix it like a TV, fridge, cooker should last longer than 12 months. If they refuse you can take them to the small claims court to claim the money back, the item is then there's to pick up.

The 5 year return seems a bit far fetched though? You need to link to government website

Original Poster

lumoruk;4491981

12 months is the manufacturers warranty, though items are expected to … 12 months is the manufacturers warranty, though items are expected to last a reasonable amount of time (the time limit is not set in law) so if an item fails after the 12 month warranty you can still ask them to fix it like a TV, fridge, cooker should last longer than 12 months. If they refuse you can take them to the small claims court to claim the money back, the item is then there's to pick up. The 5 year return seems a bit far fetched though? You need to link to government website



cant seem to find the site where i saw it

That's because the 5 years thing is wrong. Think about it - if you were given an indefinite period of time within which to own an item and then a further five years after noticing that it had a fault to get yourself a replacement, you'd never really need to buy the same item twice. And how'd that benefit the government? They enforce enough pro-consumer legislation to keep people feeling comfortable in making large purchases, but they know tat too much would obliterate retailers, as they'd make no money, and then neither would the government out of VAT and the like.

Anyway, as memory serves, the five year (or six year, depending on where you are) thing starts at the date of purchase, and applies only to faults present on the day of production, caused by manufacturing errors. Dell's GX270 line is a good example. They were built with faulty capacitors that were prone to blowing within a few years, hence were built faulty, and were covered with extended warranties of around five years, but only for the component affected by the manufacturing fault.

Six years to make a claim. Within the first six month of the purchase the retailer must proof that the product was free of any defects at the time of sale, thereafter the responsibility switches to the buyer. Which basically means you need a professional to inspect the goods and write a report saying that the product stopped working, due to an actual defect that was there from day one and over time caused the fault.

You can take the part about the purchase receipt one step further.
If the box still has the shops price label on it or if the serial number allows the retailer to clearly identify the item as sold by them, that may actually suffice as well - as mentioned an invoice is only needed for warranty claims with the manufacturer.

Banned

SUMMONER;4492198

Six years to make a claim. Within the first six month of the purchase the … Six years to make a claim. Within the first six month of the purchase the retailer must proof that the product was free of any defects at the time of sale, thereafter the responsibility switches to the buyer. Which basically means you need a professional to inspect the goods and write a report saying that the product stopped working, due to an actual defect that was there from day one and over time caused the fault.You can take the part about the purchase receipt one step further.If the box still has the shops price label on it or if the serial number allows the retailer to clearly identify the item as sold by them, that may actually suffice as well - as mentioned an invoice is only needed for warranty claims with the manufacturer.



efficient. correct. cheers

One further thing is that any item purchased must be fit for the purpose it was sold for, so if you specifically tell the salesman that you want to buy glue for sticking wood and he sells you glue for plastics and it doesn't work than you are within your rights to demand a full refund.

Banned

Spod;4493647

One further thing is that any item purchased must be fit for the purpose … One further thing is that any item purchased must be fit for the purpose it was sold for, so if you specifically tell the salesman that you want to buy glue for sticking wood and he sells you glue for plastics and it doesn't work than you are within your rights to demand a full refund.



fit for purpose covers goods that haven't been made very well for the job intended/described, not dumb salesman :roll:

lumoruk;4493767

fit for purpose covers goods that haven't been made very well for the job … fit for purpose covers goods that haven't been made very well for the job intended/described, not dumb salesman :roll:



No. Fit for purpose means both generally e.g. hi-fi speakers should play music but also specifically for any purpose you've asked. E.g. if you've asked ‘will they fit my Hitachi Hi-fi?', and been told yes, but it doesn't, then it wasn't fit for the purpose specified. That is because the Sale of Goods Act 1979 ensures goods should be both of satisfactory quality and fit to do the job intended for them.

Banned

Spod;4494739

No. Fit for purpose means both generally e.g. hi-fi speakers should play … No. Fit for purpose means both generally e.g. hi-fi speakers should play music but also specifically for any purpose you've asked. E.g. if you've asked ‘will they fit my Hitachi Hi-fi?', and been told yes, but it doesn't then it wasn't fit for the purpose specified. That is because the Sale of Goods Act 1979 ensures goods should be both of satisfactory quality and fit to do the job intended for them.



okay :whistling:
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