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Cooker hood advice please

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Found 9th Jul 2013
Hello, I am having some rewiring done in my kitchen and have been told that if I purchase a cooker hood the electricians will fit it at no extra charge, however, it must be one that has no pipes which need a hole made in to the wall etc. I have an Electrolux cooker - 60 cm wide - would I have to buy a cooker hood the same width, 60 cm, as the cooker? I've looked on-line at Currys at a few and was considering their basic, standard black one. It looks as if it should be just attached to the wall, is this correct, because on another site it says that the standard ones have to be fitted under a wall cupboard (there is not one above my cooker). Also, do the chimney type ones have to have a hole made through the wall for extraction? Any advice most appreciated.

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You need a visor cooker hood that fits direct to the wall without a cabinet above. The hood needs to fit in the gap if you have cabinets either side. If you have no cabinets either side, then one the same width as the cooker will cover the whole cooking area.

B&Q has a buying guide here.

Original Poster

ceres

You need a visor cooker hood that fits direct to the wall without a … You need a visor cooker hood that fits direct to the wall without a cabinet above. The hood needs to fit in the gap if you have cabinets either side. If you have no cabinets either side, then one the same width as the cooker will cover the whole cooking area.B&Q has a buying guide here.




Sorry never had a cooker hood before, but would the visor type be simply screwed to a wall and would it just use a standard lead with plug attached? Thank you.

Original Poster

Terrabytes

The one at Currys will be fine. You need one that is "recirculating" … The one at Currys will be fine. You need one that is "recirculating" rather than "extraction" or "ducted".It only has an acrylic filter though - you could always add a charcoal/grease filter later.



Just wondering, have you actually got a visor type one yourself, seeing what you mentioned about the filter? From what I can see, a visor type will not get rid of smoke, just the smell is that correct? Thank you.

Having had both recirculating and outside connected hoods, it would be worth considering stretching yourself to one that is ducted outside, if at all possible

You will have to check what the model you choose has - some have plugs, some don't. A plug can be put on but you have to think about safety - where is the socket and will you have a cable trailing behind the hob.

Recirculating hoods are supposed to get rid of smells and smoke, they're just not very good at it, even with an upgraded filter.

Original Poster

The basic essential one at Currys can be used as for recirculating and/or extracting. It says that it has an extraction rate of 180 m3/h, however, I will be using it just for recirculating (no venting outside required) - does the extraction rate of 180 m3/h make any difference at all if it is used just for recirculating? Only asking, as for extraction it says you should measure the HxWxD of kitchen, etc and multiply it by 30 to get the size of extractor needed. My kitchen is quite large and if using venting (which I will not be), would require one with a higher extraction rate. Can I get away with the 180 m3/h for a larger kitchen if used just for recirculating? Any advice most appreciated. Thank you.

The rate is the speed at which air is pulled into the hood irrespective of whether its being vented or not. If the rate is not sufficient for your size of kitchen, it will be even less effective than a non-vented one already is.

Terrabytes

You don't really need to worry too much about the specifics.The basic one … You don't really need to worry too much about the specifics.The basic one will still be more effective than having none, however.



So just settle for the first one you stumble upon. Never mind that perhaps there are more effective available, maybe at the same or a better price.

A 40W light bulb will give you light, will be more effective than none but won't light a large room effectively.

hi i fit kitchens so here some advice. first a chimney type would be ideal if there support above ie a cupboard. u dont need to out with the pipe. all the hoods are pretty much the same a fan sucking the air up. if u dont go out it will simply suck the air up and back into the room. firstly the grease is caught onto the mesh filter after this if u buy charcoal filters from the manufacturer then this will take the smell from the air if u dont then the air goes straight through the fan and up into the air. if your pipe goes out then u dont need charcoal filters. most people dont fit the filter

Terrabytes

£25 fitted is the cheapest and most cost-effective solution.



It's probably the cheapest. Cost-effective - no.

Terrabytes

Lol. Are you suggesting that a more powerful ducted unit is going to be … Lol. Are you suggesting that a more powerful ducted unit is going to be more economical to run? :)You're misunderstanding your market. This is the same as people buying cooling fans during the hot weather - they buy because they see it's only £5 delivered from Maplin and not because they have considered the cubic capacity of the room, the proximity of windows and doors, level of insulation or building construction and the cfm, dimensions and energy consumption of said fan.This is not an operating theatre or ITU where airflow and number of room exchanges per hour is going to be mission critical.



No. I'm suggesting that paying £25 for something which is not up to the job is not cost-effective. But if the OP just wants something cheap filling a space on the wall and that makes a noise when it's switched on, that's the one to go for.
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