Cookies - where's my choice?

7
Posted 17th Apr
Ok, I can say yes or no when a website wants me to accept them, but it seems to have gone from one extreme to another.
We used to automatically accept them regardless of what we wanted, but now half the websites I want to visit .i.e. news, Nectar etc. refuse point blank to let you access, or view, a single thing unless you accept cookies.

Some sites, such as the Manchester Evening News website, have more pop up adverts, unwanted videos, spam adverts etc. than actual news, and accepting cookies here probably does more harm than good.
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What are you asking
Chocolate chip is the go to for most of us
Cookie choices on every website is so annoying i can’t really believe we have to deal with such a nuisance in 2020 that makes the internet browsing slower and more complicated to use. I agree with the principle, just not how annoying it is.
I can relate. They say you can do it on browser but then I have to remember to put it on everytime I want to use cashback site which I'll forget.
I block cookies (scripts and ads too) by default, and only allow them on sites I visit regularly.
If I visit I site I don't visit regularly, I only allow if needed to make the site work properly.
After I've visited that site, I re-block cookies, close the browser and wipe cookies, cache, history etc.
I never open tabs from multiple sites in the same session. It's just a habit I'm stuck with.
Sam22317/04/2020 21:13

Cookie choices on every website is so annoying i can’t really believe we h …Cookie choices on every website is so annoying i can’t really believe we have to deal with such a nuisance in 2020 that makes the internet browsing slower and more complicated to use. I agree with the principle, just not how annoying it is.


Cookie management should have been left to the browser and the user's default and per site configuration setting and browser plug-ins.

Unfortunately the EU became interested in the privacy issues of cookies after being drawn into the Phorm controversy, an advertising system deployed by BT which used a web proxy and injected cookies to intercept users traffic and target adverts.
theregister.co.uk/201…es/
Edited by: "melted" 17th Apr
The vast majority simply cannot operate without cookies. They're needed to maintain sessions, help with navigation and do all sorts of background tasks that the user won't even be aware of.

GDPR is a hilariously badly thought out piece of legislation with wording so vague that no one wants to take the chance and trust the 'exceptions' and every data company is dreading a big test case where they define the boundaries of the legislation at a level where it's impossible to comply. This will probably happen when the EU next decide they want a few billion from Google or Amazon

For the average user it's made sites many times more intrusive and annoying and the GDPR compliant cookie notices can actually make you sign over more rights than before it was implemented.
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