Cracking in external brick - 1960s bungalow

19
Found 30th Apr
Hello

Hopefully someone with a bit more knowledge on brickwork/surveying can give me a steer.

I'm looking to buy a bungalow built in around 1968. Its in generally good condition and seems to be well looked after (recent new roof and double glazing for example.)

I've had a mortgage valuation done and the surveyor mentioned 'evidence of previous movement; no evidence to suggest this is ongoing'

I rang up and spoke to him and he said there is minor cracking below the DPC. previous repointing in this area has been carried out by what seems to be a rubbish standard and is a completely different colour.

He said it's likely to be shrinkage/thermal expansion and I probably dont need to worry. I asked if a structural report should be done and he said its probably not necessary.

However, seeing this story here:

greenwoods.co.uk/kno…ey/

I'm a bit conscious even if he's wrong, I'll have no recourse. Then again, I don't want to spend £1000+ if I don't need to.

Based on these pictures does anyone have any clue on whether the explanation seems plausible?
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33722899.jpg33722899.jpg

these are down the side of the property - long wall approx 20-22 feet long and north facing so likely in shade most of the time
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 30th Apr
It does look a bit crappy but what’s the excess on a subsidence claim? £1k.

I would probably ask the solicitor to confirm that no subsidence has happened at the property (normally part of standard questions).

See if you can get some kind of indemnity against it (if available).
I live in 1964 bungalow. Everyone around me has some cracks somewhere in the bricks as foundations were not very good them days. Still. You need to check it out. We did and they just said normal ground movement
Looks like a fresh air inlet (FAI) has been inserted and possibly a new DPM? You can ask the seller via your solicitor. I gather the floor is of timber suspended construction? Is there an access hatch and if so, did the surveyor include that in the home report/survey?

What is the grille slightly higher up on the wall to left of FAI?
The above may also help.
cmdr_elito43 m ago

It does look a bit crappy but what’s the excess on a subsidence claim? £ …It does look a bit crappy but what’s the excess on a subsidence claim? £1k. I would probably ask the solicitor to confirm that no subsidence has happened at the property (normally part of standard questions).See if you can get some kind of indemnity against it (if available).


the HIP the vendor completed states no previous subsidence, although presumably it only needs to be declared if dealt with formally (i.e. insurance)

i dont think indemnities cover physical rectification, only the cost of removing/altering a structure that might be unsafe or not have the appropiate permissions, unless i have misunderstood..
wayners34 m ago

I live in 1964 bungalow. Everyone around me has some cracks somewhere in …I live in 1964 bungalow. Everyone around me has some cracks somewhere in the bricks as foundations were not very good them days. Still. You need to check it out. We did and they just said normal ground movement


i do plan on speaking to the neighbours to see if they have the same sort of cracks
mccauley28 m ago

Looks like a fresh air inlet (FAI) has been inserted and possibly a new …Looks like a fresh air inlet (FAI) has been inserted and possibly a new DPM? You can ask the seller via your solicitor. I gather the floor is of timber suspended construction? Is there an access hatch and if so, did the surveyor include that in the home report/survey?What is the grille slightly higher up on the wall to left of FAI?


the floors are solid concrete so i dont think any of those are applicable. it was only a mortgage valuation so they do state the inspection is limited although the surveyor apparently spent a lot of time in the loft...

i think its a vent for the gas cooker in the kitchen on the other side of the wall
mccauley21 m ago

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/using-coal-mining-information


it's not in a former mining area - the search hasnt been requested so i dont think this is applicable
adamspencer957 m ago

the floors are solid concrete so i dont think any of those are applicable. …the floors are solid concrete so i dont think any of those are applicable. it was only a mortgage valuation so they do state the inspection is limited although the surveyor apparently spent a lot of time in the loft...i think its a vent for the gas cooker in the kitchen on the other side of the wall


Possibly historic damp issues which would explain new DPM. FAI possibly installed to vent cavity wall. However, they use small weepers in modern construction to allow any water in the cavity to run to the outside.

Did the surveyor use a damp meter? Most surveyors carry them even valuation surveyors.
Edited by: "mccauley" 30th Apr
Subsidence is normally diagonal step cracks often from the corners of doors or windows.
I mean if you are worried about the state of the bricks and are paying top price for the place you could always ask them to put it right or give a discount to cover the cost?
Google "Structural Movement in Buildings", the second link (PDF) down is a good document to have a look at. For some reason it's not letting me post the link.
I wouldnt woory about that crack at all.
there also seems to be some similar small cracks on the front elevation under the doorway
33724939-nNJyK.jpg
seems to have been repointed towards the end of the wall too

33724939-MqpSD.jpg
just as an update for the thread - I've decided to instruct a structural surveyor for a buildings survey. I'm not confident i wont have missed something else and its the biggest purchase i'll make after all

wish me luck
Looks like DPM remedial works. DPM should be minimum 150mm from ground level. Last photo looks like 140mm. Easiest way to sort is to lower ground level. Plus DPM bridged by pointing which could cause water ingress to the concrete floor.

In regard to cracking, I wouldn't be concerned at all.

Let us know what comes out of the survey.
survey was completed on Friday

executive summary: nothing major to worry about

cracking is likely just thermal expansion and contraction as its almost entirely below DPC. yes DPC is bridged in some areas but no current damp so i'll rectify when i move in.

roof and front windows are reaching the end of their expected lifespan but no current problems so if it aint broke....

all good but the survey has at least given me peace of mind
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 6th May
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