Credit card fraud been scammed by a neighbour is that possible

hi there, wasn't really sure where to ask, but Friday i looked at my credit card statement and there were transactions with Amazon, Dixons, PC world and a few others companies, all varying from about £20.00 to the PC world which is £400.00. I phoned my credit card and asked them and they put it on stop straight away. I've just took a phone call from my credit card fraud team who have said that they have looked into it and they have said that the transactions have been made using the similar IP address to one which has previosuly made transactions which i have confirmed i have made such as sainsburys online shopping.
I havent not made these transactions and its only me and my wife in the house and she has definatley not made them.

I phoned amazon to ask and they said there is several accounts in my name but they wont give me anymore information as it would breach there code of conduct (its my information!!!) I will phone pc world in a minute to see if they will give me any information. In total before it was stopped is about £800 which i can ill afford to pay out right now for something i havent ordered, and i think thats what the credit card are suggesting.

In the end the fraud tream guy was saying hes happy with his investigation and he believes it could be someone such as my wife or freind that has used my internet connection. I know i have a security set on it but ive had my same broadband connection for 2.5 years and left it as is, just remembered it as WEP or WPA.

Could one of my neighbours hack into my network is that possible? the guy next to me is a traffic cop so think it would be uinlikely to be him!
Plus i would notice someone sitting outside my house on a laptop.
dont know what to do as I'm out of my depth when it comes to computers etc

78 Comments

Wrong forum section, I am sure someone will move it.

Check your security connection settings. Get a new password and use WPA not WEP, a semi-technical minded individual can crack WEP in minutes.

Try to get all transactions made stopped if possible. It doesnt have to be your neighbour, could be a passer by or someone some distance away depending on your street layout.

Yes they can. Why don't you log in to your amazon account and check all the delivery addresses listed against your account?

If you used WEP on your wifi router then I believe its possible to hack your network in 10 mins.

jack73bump

Yes they can. Why don't you log in to your amazon account and check all … Yes they can. Why don't you log in to your amazon account and check all the delivery addresses listed against your account?


because they are in his name, not his email address, how will he know what email adresses have been used

i am sure the fraud team will get to the bottom of it, so dont get worrying yourself stupid, go into your router settings and see who is using it, although i doubt they are stupid enough to name their computers

It's fraud.
The credit card company will refund you.

using the similar IP address

Similar, or identical?

Using a similar IP address?

IP addresses don't work like that. They aren't like phone numbers or postcodes or anything intrinsically linked to a geographical location, they're network addresses, and although there is a loose geographical connection for logistical reasons, there's nothing to say that two people with a similar IP address even live in the same country, nevermind the same street.

If it's the exact same IP address, then it's 99% likely to be someone with access to your home network. If it isn't, it could be anyone, from anywhere. So don't get all paranoid about your friends or neighbours hacking your network or whatnot, they're most likely innocent in all this.

Original Poster

hi thanks for the replies, ive checked my amazon account and there is nothign there, i failed the first security check with amazon because of course i couldnt provide the correct email address so i gave them my address and name and she said we have several accounts with that name, when iasked if she coudl check if the same credit card was used on them she wouldnt do it. She did say that i could speak to my credit card and ask them to phone up and speak to them and they will deal and pass information over to them.
Just worried that its easier to put the blame on me and expect me to pay out and i cant do anything about it all. Plus now they said a new card will be issued and stupidly only have the one credit card, and the new card can take upto 14days to arrive.


If its wep encyption on your router then its easy to crack with backtrack, once they are logged on to your router they can perform a MITM (man in the middle attack) where they force all your network traffic through their computer and then can gather packets of data which can be "sniffed" for passwords, bank details etc basicly anything you do online.

A basic version of this can be seen with the firefox extension firesheep.

Use WPA or WPA2 these can still be hacked but not very easily, they use a dictionary attack and these dictionarys can be downloaded and up to 10GB in size or more, the good news if you use random letters and keep it long enough (16 caharcters or so) have a mixture of numbers and letters, throw the odd capital in and you are sound.


Random seeming passwords seem hard to remember but there are tricks to help. Hell even write it down and keep it safe just in case, they arent going to break in for a password.

For example use a phrase such as ten green elephants climbing on a wall in the year 2000 drinking champagne! could be 10gEcoawity2000dc!


If you check your router it will show what devices are connected and what devices have been in the logs.

Original Poster

dxx

Using a similar IP address? IP addresses don't work like that. They … Using a similar IP address? IP addresses don't work like that. They aren't like phone numbers or postcodes or anything intrinsically linked to a geographical location, they're network addresses, and although there is a loose geographical connection for logistical reasons, there's nothing to say that two people with a similar IP address even live in the same country, nevermind the same street. If it's the exact same IP address, then it's 99% likely to be someone with access to your home network. If it isn't, it could be anyone, from anywhere. So don't get all paranoid about your friends or neighbours hacking your network or whatnot, they're most likely innocent in all this.



i said is it the same and he woudlnt say he jsut said he is happy with his investigation so far and he would like me to ask the people that have access to my newtork such as friends and family again as perhaps they have been ordering birthday presents for me!!!! Which would be nice but definatley not the case.

Report it to the police cyber crimes unit and they will give a case number, this case number adds a lot of weight when dealing with credit card companies and force a proper investigation.

So what u guys think which is the best protection on a router?and if wep is that easy to break then why its there in first place?

dxx

Using a similar IP address? IP addresses don't work like that. They … Using a similar IP address? IP addresses don't work like that. They aren't like phone numbers or postcodes or anything intrinsically linked to a geographical location, they're network addresses, and although there is a loose geographical connection for logistical reasons, there's nothing to say that two people with a similar IP address even live in the same country, nevermind the same street. If it's the exact same IP address, then it's 99% likely to be someone with access to your home network. If it isn't, it could be anyone, from anywhere. So don't get all paranoid about your friends or neighbours hacking your network or whatnot, they're most likely innocent in all this.



I thought that most ISP's will assign a block of IP addresses to one area so if its someone who shares the same ISP then their IP will be very similar, I know O2 work differently as the IP is assigned to your routers mac address as the only way to change your IP is to edit the mac address, so rebooting a router wont change it. However most ISP's just give you one from the block when the router is restarted.

WEP was invented in 300BC, I think the Romans cracked it using pythagoras theorem.

addjon

So what u guys think which is the best protection on a router?and if wep … So what u guys think which is the best protection on a router?and if wep is that easy to break then why its there in first place?



WEP is an old encryption method. the trouble is some (older) devices wont work with WPA/WPA2.


Best way to protect your router? See my post 9

or

































Open the casing and place a couple of jinis in there, they love snacking on hackers
Edited by: "harlzter" 22nd Jun 2011

addjon

So what u guys think which is the best protection on a router?and if wep … So what u guys think which is the best protection on a router?and if wep is that easy to break then why its there in first place?



Because it was found to be weak after it was commonly being used, as with most things. Most new routers don't use wep by default any more, but the option is left there because some old network cards are only compatible with wep. The Nintendo DS Lite is only compatible with wep for example.

Banned

ISPs get assigned blocks of IP addresses, they're not randomly doled out around the world.

Original Poster

thanks i will check when i get home tonight what setting i have, i bet its the easy one. if i remember correctly when i was trying to set it up i was using the harder one and laptop coudlnt find the router, (todl you i wasnt very good with computers)
so frustrating, but i think i'm with 02 so not sur eif that makes it better or not though.

told my missus to turnt he router off untill i get in although i dont there still hanging around and the doing something else. The credit card company said another large transaction was put through on sunday evening and that was for £659.00 but the security systems stopped that one.
Edited by: "essexgangsta" 22nd Jun 2011

who has a key/access to your house apart from you & your wife?

lol at buying birthday presents for you.. with your own money O_O

Your card could have been cloned and used by someone local to you. Your local petrol station could be the culprit.

However it happened, don't pay the bill for someone else's purchases. Even if it was someone in your household, it's still an unauthorised transaction - who did it is irrelevant.

essexgangsta

thanks i will check when i get home tonight what setting i have, i bet … thanks i will check when i get home tonight what setting i have, i bet its the easy one. if i remember correctly when i was trying to set it up i was using the harder one and laptop coudlnt find the router, (todl you i wasnt very good with computers)so frustrating, but i think i'm with 02 so not sur eif that makes it better or not though.



even though 02 offer an optional extra of static IP addresses the only time it will change is if you chnage your router or routers mac address

oldmanhouse

Your card could have been cloned and used by someone local to you. Your … Your card could have been cloned and used by someone local to you. Your local petrol station could be the culprit. .



Play.com had some cards hacked, have you used it?

oldmanhouse

Your card could have been cloned and used by someone local to you. Your … Your card could have been cloned and used by someone local to you. Your local petrol station could be the culprit.



Good point, petrol sations used to be really bad for this never let the card out of your sight, a common trick is to pretend to drop it and swipe it out of sight on a card reader, really though thats OTT for an online order, thats only needed for physical transactions in store all they need is the numbers on the front and the CVV (last 3 digits on the back). Its much easier to get a cheap mini video camera (and i mean cheap at like a tenner - one of the md80 clones or similar and just hold the card in front for a split second, then memorise the cvv and write it down after you have left.

for an example of how clear the cameras are see my videos on youtube

in daylight

In heavy snow at night

Edited by: "harlzter" 22nd Jun 2011

What were those delivery address for those Fraud transactions ?

Were the goods delivered to your door, which is your Registered Billing Address ? If not, you will have a better chance to dispute with Credit Card company.

Also have you got any kinds of Identity Theft Protection or similar ?

Perhaps it could be a CC clone machine ? You might have used it in the shop and someone managed to swipe it through the CC reader ? Just a thought.

heovang

Perhaps it could be a CC clone machine ? You might have used it in the … Perhaps it could be a CC clone machine ? You might have used it in the shop and someone managed to swipe it through the CC reader ?



Overkill for online fraud, un-needed expense and risk of taking dodgy equipment to work a cheap camera or even camera phone does a better job.

Damn my knowledge of fraud makes me look dodgy, but it stems from reasearching how not to be a victim.

Original Poster

thanks for all the responses, i have phoned pc world customer services, as i thought that was the biggest transaction and also the easiest as i dont have an account with them so there is no confusion with regards to names etc there should be only one of me on there. really went down the route that someone out there is spending up on my card and the card company are blaming me. couldnt get alot out of them because they said its data protection (although surely its my data i shoudl be abel to see it!!) but he said as i have just told him its a possible fraud he wouldnt go into too many details including the delivery address as i could go round there.
so apaprently there is one account set up last week, there are two delivery addresses, one in essex (me) and another in newcastle (i dont even know anyone in newcastle). They have ordered a external HD for £44 which has the essex address on the delivery and a Asus £400 laptop which he thinks should have been delivered and signed for in newcastle by now. Thats the only two things on that account, but that explains the biggest amount on there. So how can someone from newcastle access my computer with the same IP address or similar IP address as my laptop? Ive just phoned the credit card company with that info gave him phone numbers and they said they will talk to them.
Edited by: "essexgangsta" 22nd Jun 2011

Original Poster

chalkysoil

Play.com had some cards hacked, have you used it?


this is play.com card (MBNA)

Banned

essexgangsta

thanks for all the responses, i have phoned pc world customer services, … thanks for all the responses, i have phoned pc world customer services, as i thought that was the biggest transaction and also the easiest as i dont have an account with them so there is no confusion with regards to names etc there should be only one of me on there. really went down the route that someone out there is spending up on my card and the card company are blaming me. couldnt get alot out of them because they said its data protection (although surely its my data i shoudl be abel to see it!!) but he said as i have just told him its a possible fraud he wouldnt go into too many details including the delivery address as i could go round there.so apaprently there is one account set up last week, there are two delivery addresses, one in essex (me) and another in newcastle (i dont even know anyone in newcastle). They have ordered a external HD for £44 which has the essex address on the delivery and a Asus £400 laptop which he thinks should have been delivered and signed for in newcastle by now. Thats the only two things on that account, but that explains the biggest amount on there. So how can someone from newcastle access my computer with the same IP address or similar IP address as my laptop? Ive just phoned the credit card company with that info gave him phone numbers and they said they will talk to them.



It's just a delivery address, it could be anywhere.

Original Poster

master_chief

It's just a delivery address, it could be anywhere.



i can see i'm going to have to google this because i'm still confused over the whole IP address thing, the credit card have said its the same or similar IP address which means they must be near to my house (wirless router) but the address is newcastle and as its a £400 item its got to have gone via a courier plus signed for etc. the smaller amounts with amazon i dont know what there for but i'll assume usual post service so no signatures, the Hardive being sent to my home address (which has not been delivered or attempted yet). Why send a parcel to me, to raise the suspcion of me and then order other items, doesnt make any sense.

Even if they are on your home network, they will be ordering it like anyone else they can send it to Newcastle, Hong Kong anywhere.

You know with the wikileaks hackers, how they used "host" computers, could this hacker have done the same? Used OP's computer as a host, got his details etc, so it looked like it was ordered from his computer, then everything's delivered to the hacker? Not sure if it's possible?

Banned

If it's a similar IP address but not the same as one you've used then they've not gone near your house but may be local but that's not a definite. If there's no overlap of an IP address you've used and one used by these criminals then the credit card company shouldn't be factoring IP addresses in at all.

essexgangsta

thanks for all the responses, i have phoned pc world customer services, … thanks for all the responses, i have phoned pc world customer services, as i thought that was the biggest transaction and also the easiest as i dont have an account with them so there is no confusion with regards to names etc there should be only one of me on there. really went down the route that someone out there is spending up on my card and the card company are blaming me. couldnt get alot out of them because they said its data protection (although surely its my data i shoudl be abel to see it!!) but he said as i have just told him its a possible fraud he wouldnt go into too many details including the delivery address as i could go round there.so apaprently there is one account set up last week, there are two delivery addresses, one in essex (me) and another in newcastle (i dont even know anyone in newcastle). They have ordered a external HD for £44 which has the essex address on the delivery and a Asus £400 laptop which he thinks should have been delivered and signed for in newcastle by now. Thats the only two things on that account, but that explains the biggest amount on there. So how can someone from newcastle access my computer with the same IP address or similar IP address as my laptop? Ive just phoned the credit card company with that info gave him phone numbers and they said they will talk to them.



I'm getting suspicious about your fraud investigator. He tells you that the IP address of the user of the stolen card details is "similar" to yours, but refuses to elaborate on what "similar" means, or to confirm if "similar" = "the same", which to me strongly implies that they're two different IP addresses. Try going to infosniper.net and playing around with permutations of your current IP address, and you'll see how drastically changing a single digit can change the location it can be roughly traced to. Personally, my next move would be to speak to your fraud investigator and demand a straight answer: Is the IP address used to buy these goods the exact same as yours, or not?

Banned

dxx

I'm getting suspicious about your fraud investigator. He tells you that … I'm getting suspicious about your fraud investigator. He tells you that the IP address of the user of the stolen card details is "similar" to yours, but refuses to elaborate on what "similar" means, or to confirm if "similar" = "the same", which to me strongly implies that they're two different IP addresses. Try going to http://www.infosniper.net and playing around with permutations of your current IP address, and you'll see how drastically changing a single digit can change the location it can be roughly traced to. Personally, my next move would be to speak to your fraud investigator and demand a straight answer: Is the IP address used to buy these goods the exact same as yours, or not?



A single digit early on in the address will yes but shouldn't make too much difference if it's the last couple of digits.

It doesn't help when companies such as Amazon store your CC details unless you go in and manually delete them every time you use it.

this is play.com card (MBNA)



google Play.com fraud and read the horror stories.

Have you tried removing details from Play,nitemare.

master_chief

A single digit early on in the address will yes but shouldn't make too … A single digit early on in the address will yes but shouldn't make too much difference if it's the last couple of digits.



I think you're missing the point.

Exact same = the thief used the OP's very own network
!Exact same = the theif used a different network

In the first case, the OP's home security or home network security has been compromised. In the latter, someone in a nearby petrol station probably just copied the card numbers.
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