Currys 5 year warranty- transferable??

5
Found 1st Mar 2015
Hi- thinking of buying an almost new television for sale on Gumtree which has a 5 year warranty.
Receipt is available, but are there any issues if I have to make a claim?
As the second owner, will I still be covered?
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I would approach with caution as Ive sold a fridge with a warranty about 3years ago and apparently it was not transferable but ive since found out that the sales of goods act makes warranties transferable if there are no defects when sold. Best advice get on the phone to curries and explain it to them. their customer service sucks but they are obliged to help you and explain that you are quering the transfer of a warranty and does it have any relation to the sales of goods act 1983. normally when you mention the sales of goods act retailers treat you with alot more care.
You can transfer the original owner needs to send currys era letter about transferring ownership and with your details about who it is transferring to.
Jonwilkie

I would approach with caution as Ive sold a fridge with a warranty about … I would approach with caution as Ive sold a fridge with a warranty about 3years ago and apparently it was not transferable but ive since found out that the sales of goods act makes warranties transferable if there are no defects when sold. Best advice get on the phone to curries and explain it to them. their customer service sucks but they are obliged to help you and explain that you are quering the transfer of a warranty and does it have any relation to the sales of goods act 1983. normally when you mention the sales of goods act retailers treat you with alot more care.



An extended warranty isn't anything to do with sales of goods act, read the terms of the warranty it will tell you if you can transfer it or not.

The sales of goods act defines exactly what a warranty is and what is obliged and falls under a "warranty"

What legal protection do I get with warranties and guarantees?
The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002 states that if a guarantee provider offers a guarantee on goods sold or supplied to consumers, the provider takes on a contractual obligation to honour the conditions set out in the guarantee. For example, if the guarantee provider refuses to repair goods as set out under the terms of the guarantee, you can take legal action against the provider of the guarantee for breach of contract. This could be claiming back the cost of repairs if you have had them carried out elsewhere.

The guarantee should be written in English and the terms should be set out in plain intelligible language. The name and address of the guarantee provider, the duration of the guarantee and the location it covers must also be given. You have the right to ask the provider to make the guarantee available to you in writing or any other durable form available.

If you have a problem with an insurance backed extended warranty that was sold to you, and you have been unable to resolve it with the warranty provider, you are entitled to take your complaint to the Financial Ombudsman Service. For problems with non insurance backed extended warranties, contact the Citizens Advice consumer service.

The Supply of Extended Warranties on Domestic Electrical Goods Order 2005 requires traders that supply extended warranties on domestic electrical goods to provide consumers with certain information before the sale of the extended warranty. But if you need:

The first thing to say is that a manufacturer's warranty only covers faults in manufacture - it will not be any good as far as wear and tear is concerned. The seller may have told you the card was 12 months old, but do you have any means of verifying that?

In general terms a second-hand purchase is protected in the same way as that of a new product, provided you buy from a retailer. If you buy from a private individual however, the regulations are different - the transaction is classed as a private sale, and the goods you buy must only be correctly described, and be the legal property of the seller. If you were told the card was 12 months old, that's all it has to be, there's no assumption of it being fit for purpose - that is for you to determine. The old adage of caveat emptor applies.

InThe manufacturer has no contract with you (or with the first owner), so there's no liability in law there - the manufacturer's warranty is in addition to your legal rights, you may be lucky and find that the maker will help out, but I wouldn't bank on it.


If all else fails mention that you are enquiring about warranty repair in relation to the sales of goods act,The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002 and The Supply of Extended Warranties on Domestic Electrical Goods Order 2005. These 3 sentences coupled together are enough to scare most firms to help you out to prevent any further hassle from you

BUT in the long term there is no proviso that the warranty would still be applied
I once bought a Philips HPC 2nd hand and cashed the extended warranty in for £85 Not sure if they still do that but sometimes you can get a good return on an unused extended warranty.
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