Damp and mould in rented homes help and advice

9
Found 10th Aug 2017
Hello my brother and partner are privatly renting a property which last night I noticed they must have a leak from the shower as the bathroom has mould growth on the carpet around the side and wall.

I asked if he has had the landlord out but he said they won't come out. now something in my head tells me I've heard that if the property has mould/not liveable then the council can step in and help them out?

my brother has asthma and they have a 6month old baby. they have been trying to move to a new flat or house to rent but a upfront 3k is hard to come by.

Is there anything I can suggest to them as there landlord really don't help or want to know about any problems at all.
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Damp is a xxxxx! Iv made a extra wall and put damp sheet between and now its made it worse because of the smell. Today i had problems breathing when I woke up. Im now going to sort out the skirting boards because I didn't bother sticking them on, i cut them to size and layed them on the wall.
If the mould is extremely bad, the council can look into it but if only a small patch they may not classify as health risk as many homes suffer from mould to some extent. If the mould is on the carpet, then it sounds more like rising damp rather than a leak from upstairs as the mould would appear on the walls.

Mould are very difficult to treat as the above poster has said. Treatment is often expensive and dont always irradicate the problem. At best they can be controlled. With DPC course for rising damp, ventilation for the property and tenants being sensible and not dry clothes inside the property or not opening windows after a bath etc.

If the landlord won't even come out to look at the problem, it may be due to a dispute your brother has with him so they are not on speaking terms or rent owed. If this is not the case, then taking a hard stance with the landlord may help. Tell him you will stop paying the rent if he doesn't come round to look
I don't know why renters insist the landlord pick up the tab for everything in this country. You wouldn't in Germany. Fair enough if you've only been renting for 6 months but take some responsibility for the damp and take measures to stop it. They live in the home, not the landlord.
it depends on what the cause is. if it is due to the tenant being reckless or negligent, i.e. not airing rooms, cleaning water etc then the tenant is liable.

if the mould is caused by a fault of the building or equipment provided by the landlord then it will be their responsibility to rectify it.

identifying who is responsible is obviously the million dollar question.
You brother has a duty of care for the property, if the landlord refuses to come to the property ( may reside overseas) then your brother should be trying his best endeavours to rectify the problem. Has he tried rolling back the carpet and looking for the source, perhaps the shower tray sealant needs repairing or just opening the windows for extra ventilation etc.
Yes,the landlord should be making more of an effort but your brother also needs to step up if only for the wellbeing of his family.
mutley12 h, 26 m ago

Tell him you will stop paying the rent if he doesn't come round to look


Probably the worst advice anyone can offer in this situation

@ OP
Ask the council to have a look/investigate
At the same time write a letter to the landlord (recorded delivery/signed for) asking them to fix the problem within 14 days otherwise you will have no other option to request and a plumber to investigate an make good any leaks and then hire a dehumidifer or other device to remove the excess damp at the expense of the landlord.

If you need to go down this route then get everything in writing (quotes/receipts etc) make copies of each and send a copy (recorded/signed for) to the landlord and only then might you deduct the total costs (including expenses) from the rent.
mutley13 h, 25 m ago

If the landlord won't even come out to look at the problem, it may be due …If the landlord won't even come out to look at the problem, it may be due to a dispute your brother has with him so they are not on speaking terms or rent owed. If this is not the case, then taking a hard stance with the landlord may help. Tell him you will stop paying the rent if he doesn't come round to look.


Possibly the stupidest comment I've seen on this site.

"Your Landlord might be being a b*****d because of rent arrears... Why not threaten him with rent arrears?"
philphil614 h, 23 m ago

Probably the worst advice anyone can offer in this situation@ OP Ask the …Probably the worst advice anyone can offer in this situation@ OP Ask the council to have a look/investigateAt the same time write a letter to the landlord (recorded delivery/signed for) asking them to fix the problem within 14 days otherwise you will have no other option to request and a plumber to investigate an make good any leaks and then hire a dehumidifer or other device to remove the excess damp at the expense of the landlord.If you need to go down this route then get everything in writing (quotes/receipts etc) make copies of each and send a copy (recorded/signed for) to the landlord and only then might you deduct the total costs (including expenses) from the rent.


Couldn't agree more. Don't just ignore your responsibilities to the landlord/property just because the landlord is ignoring their responsibilities towards you. Keep your side of the contract - if you need a reference later, the last thing you want is for a landlord to say you didn't keep up with rent.
Buy a humidity tester off EBay less than £10, and make sure it isn't a condensation problem through lack of ventilation first. I am a landlords and nine times out of ten this is the problem people happily dry all their washing indoors and have showers creating steam but don't want to open a window as heating costs money. If it is damp the perhaps a gutter need cleaning etc.
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