Deep Screw

19
Found 16th Jan
Trying to put a curtain up.
The supplied screws are quite a bit longer than the supplied wall plugs.
Should I drill the hole to be as deep as the screw, or only as deep as the wall plug?
Bearing in mind this is a brick wall.
The instructions are useless as is the customer service team.
Two people who I have asked gave different answers.
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Are you sure the curtain rail does not take up the extra depth, by this I mean the screw is 6mm longer but the curtain rail is the also 6mm think so the screw will not go deeper anyway.
19 Comments
As deep as the screw.... the plugs will/should have a flangey bit so it doesn't dissapear as far down the hole.. If you don't drill has long as the screw , the screw is just going to come up against brick and you won't be able to screw the screw in flush.
Edited by: "steve.t" 16th Jan
Use a good red plug with a 5.5mm drill for 3.5mm screws or if you use a thicker screw... 4mm..then a 6mm drill with the red plug.. I hardly ever use the supplied fixings and it's worded in directions to use correct fitting for the wall type.. Get shorter screws.
Edited by: "wayners" 16th Jan
Are you sure the curtain rail does not take up the extra depth, by this I mean the screw is 6mm longer but the curtain rail is the also 6mm think so the screw will not go deeper anyway.
For fitting curtain poles, blinds etc I use one of these on each side. Will grandchildren running around curtains are always a victim.

Rawlbolts
Take the screw to your nearest diy store and buy raw plugs that are the same size.

Stating the obvious, there can be a lot in weight in curtains.
hottoast46 m ago

Take the screw to your nearest diy store and buy raw plugs that are the …Take the screw to your nearest diy store and buy raw plugs that are the same size.Stating the obvious, there can be a lot in weight in curtains.


Bloke in the B&Q store told me the length of the plug is irrelevant.
The plug is to prevent the screw being pulled out the hole. The longer aspect of the screw help prevent the screw rotating on an axis at the entrance to the hole.

Drill as deep as the screw requires but keep the plug surface mounted.
Oneday7721 m ago

The plug is to prevent the screw being pulled out the hole. The longer …The plug is to prevent the screw being pulled out the hole. The longer aspect of the screw help prevent the screw rotating on an axis at the entrance to the hole. Drill as deep as the screw requires but keep the plug surface mounted.


Not sure how to keep the plug at the entrance to the hole when the screw will likely push it to the very back of the hole as it goes in?


On a side-note, I am aware of the opportunities for innuendo throughout this thread and the surprising restraint demonstrated thus far.
Uranus16th Jan

Bloke in the B&Q store told me the length of the plug is irrelevant.


That's rubbish, otherwise they would not make different length rawl plugs!

Think about it logically..It is the pressure that the plug applies as it opens up that makes the fixing secure. If as an example you have a hole two inches deep, a plug that is only one inch long is only applying pressure along one inch. However a two inch plug applies pressure along two inches.

The correct size two inch plug in this example will provide a more secure and solid fixing in most circumstances.

You also need the correct type of plug, ie for brick, for plaster board etc.

The plugs supplied will be generic, not necessarily the best for your wall type.

You should ideally match the drill size to plug size, to screw size.
Uranus16th Jan

Not sure how to keep the plug at the entrance to the hole when the screw …Not sure how to keep the plug at the entrance to the hole when the screw will likely push it to the very back of the hole as it goes in?On a side-note, I am aware of the opportunities for innuendo throughout this thread and the surprising restraint demonstrated thus far.


As long as you don’t oversize the width of the hole, the plug will be fine. The screw doesn’t push in, it should pull itself in whilst pushing the plug wider. Thereby increasing grip in the hole.
One thing to note...you should have to tap the plug into the hole - it should be that tight. If you can push it in easily it is likely that it will rotate rather than screw in. If you see what I mean.
If you use a rawlbolt, as I mentioned earlier, it will tighten up easily and bear a weight of about 1/4 tonne (M6 in a good construction brick wall ). They can also be easily removed.
mrty1 h, 18 m ago

One thing to note...you should have to tap the plug into the hole - it …One thing to note...you should have to tap the plug into the hole - it should be that tight. If you can push it in easily it is likely that it will rotate rather than screw in. If you see what I mean.If you use a rawlbolt, as I mentioned earlier, it will tighten up easily and bear a weight of about 1/4 tonne (M6 in a good construction brick wall ). They can also be easily removed.


A bit overkill no?
Also they don't seem to come in a size small enough to fit the brackets for the curtain pole.

Thanks anyway.
Uranus17th Jan

A bit overkill no?Also they don't seem to come in a size small enough to …A bit overkill no?Also they don't seem to come in a size small enough to fit the brackets for the curtain pole.Thanks anyway.


The rawlbolt suggestion is ridiculous for this application.
The screw should be longer than the rawl plug to ensure it deforms and hold tightly.
hottoast14 h, 38 m ago

That's rubbish, otherwise they would not make different length rawl …That's rubbish, otherwise they would not make different length rawl plugs!Think about it logically..It is the pressure that the plug applies as it opens up that makes the fixing secure. If as an example you have a hole two inches deep, a plug that is only one inch long is only applying pressure along one inch. However a two inch plug applies pressure along two inches.


Actually the man in B&Q is correct. increasing the length of the plug does very little to increase the strength of the fixing. What matters is that the plug is a snug fit in the hole and that the screw expands the plug to compress against the sides.

Same applies with welds and adhesive joins, the depth of overlap has little impact but the width does.
Came for innuendoes. Was disappointed.
Fwiw I always drill the holes 0.5mm smaller than suggested and go slightly deeper than the length of the screw (assuming it won’t come out the other side of the wall of course), then gently tap the rawl plug in with a hammer until it’s flush. Then I screw into it. That way the plug has the tightest fit possible and the screw shouldn’t rotate it as it goes in. If the screw feels really tight going in, wipe a little soap or washing up liquid on it to ease the friction and resistance. Works for me every time. If the hole is too tight for the plug to go into in the first place, either try a slightly smaller plug or go to the correct sized drill bit...as long as you are careful not to allow the drill to move as you re-drill the hole shouldn’t be too big.
Sandman6659 m ago

Fwiw I always drill the holes 0.5mm smaller than suggested and go slightly …Fwiw I always drill the holes 0.5mm smaller than suggested and go slightly deeper than the length of the screw (assuming it won’t come out the other side of the wall of course), then gently tap the rawl plug in with a hammer until it’s flush. Then I screw into it. That way the plug has the tightest fit possible and the screw shouldn’t rotate it as it goes in. If the screw feels really tight going in, wipe a little soap or washing up liquid on it to ease the friction and resistance. Works for me every time. If the hole is too tight for the plug to go into in the first place, either try a slightly smaller plug or go to the correct sized drill bit...as long as you are careful not to allow the drill to move as you re-drill the hole shouldn’t be too big.


This is exactly how I would do it.
mas995 h, 39 m ago

Actually the man in B&Q is correct. increasing the length of the plug …Actually the man in B&Q is correct. increasing the length of the plug does very little to increase the strength of the fixing. What matters is that the plug is a snug fit in the hole and that the screw expands the plug to compress against the sides.Same applies with welds and adhesive joins, the depth of overlap has little impact but the width does.


The critical part is the drill and rawl plug diameter, the length is not "critical". However, the correct length plug will still give a better fixing than a plug that is too short, so the guy in B & Q is not correct. It is not irrelevant, it is just not as important. A small difference where the screw is poking out the end of the plug is fine but you wouldn't for example want a screw twice the length of the plug.
Edited by: "hottoast" 17th Jan
To bring closure to this matter.
I ended up drilling holes as deep as the screw.
Worked fine.

Thanks everybody.
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