Desk fan power rating

10
Posted 15th Aug
I am looking to get a 9 inch desk fan and they seem to come in 25W to 30W. Does it mean that the 30W will be better as it will be more powerful?

We have an old 12 inch desk fan, which is 50W and that is very powerful. Looking at 12 inch desk fans, they all seem to be either 30W or 40W rated and never 50W rated?
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This might help, it might not, but here goes anyway...

For a few years now we've had a tower fan, 45 watt. It's done us fine, it keeps us cool in the summer. This year though the kids have started wanting a share of the cool breeze. So I bought a couple more tower fans, 45 watts again. These are infinitely better at shifting air, and for some reason much quieter. I suspect you may also find getting a newer 12 inch fan will be much stronger than the one you have now, and even a 30w may be equal to what you have.

Short answer is, a power rating doesn't necessarily relate to how powerful it is.
slimy3115/08/2020 18:18

This might help, it might not, but here goes anyway...For a few years now …This might help, it might not, but here goes anyway...For a few years now we've had a tower fan, 45 watt. It's done us fine, it keeps us cool in the summer. This year though the kids have started wanting a share of the cool breeze. So I bought a couple more tower fans, 45 watts again. These are infinitely better at shifting air, and for some reason much quieter. I suspect you may also find getting a newer 12 inch fan will be much stronger than the one you have now, and even a 30w may be equal to what you have. Short answer is, a power rating doesn't necessarily relate to how powerful it is.


thanks. i looked on the toolstation website and there are two 9 inch desk fans on there, one is rated 25W and one is rated 30W. i thought the 30W fan must be more powerful as it draws more power. however, looking at the specifications, they both claim to move 13 meter cube of air a minute, which would then indicate that although the power rating are different on the two fans, they both produce the same effect.

i am wondering then why they are differently power rated if they do the same thing. does that then mean that in fact the 25W fan is better as it uses less power for the same result as it is more efficient?
Edited by: "mutley1" 15th Aug
Is this the 30 w;

toolstation.com/des…887

If so, that's 15 cubic m/m, rather than the 13 of the 25w.

The other aspect is that at least for me that 30w is entirely out of stock, no delivery option and no collection options at least near me. It could be that they're replacing the 30w one with the 25w one?
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deleted1163056
slimy3115/08/2020 18:18

This might help, it might not, but here goes anyway...For a few years now …This might help, it might not, but here goes anyway...For a few years now we've had a tower fan, 45 watt. It's done us fine, it keeps us cool in the summer. This year though the kids have started wanting a share of the cool breeze. So I bought a couple more tower fans, 45 watts again. These are infinitely better at shifting air, and for some reason much quieter. I suspect you may also find getting a newer 12 inch fan will be much stronger than the one you have now, and even a 30w may be equal to what you have. Short answer is, a power rating doesn't necessarily relate to how powerful it is.


sorry for being pedantic but your last sentence is incorrect and power rating does actually define how powerful it is (by definition)

what you actually mean is efficiency and effectivity
mutley115/08/2020 18:43

thanks. i looked on the toolstation website and there are two 9 inch desk …thanks. i looked on the toolstation website and there are two 9 inch desk fans on there, one is rated 25W and one is rated 30W. i thought the 30W fan must be more powerful as it draws more power. however, looking at the specifications, they both claim to move 13 meter cube of air a minute, which would then indicate that although the power rating are different on the two fans, they both produce the same effect.i am wondering then why they are differently power rated if they do the same thing. does that then mean that in fact the 25W fan is better as it uses less power for the same result as it is more efficient?


It means one fan will add 25 Watts of heating to the area it is used in, and the other will add 30 Watts of heating to the area it is used in.
Whilst a fan may provide a cooling effect if the surface subject to air movement is capable of evaporation, a fan simply moves air around at whatever temperature the air is. The fan itself adds heat to the temperature in the space it is used.
Bought a 45W tower fan recently for son's accommodation. Tested it before taking it over. In a 30 deg C room it reached right across the room so on oscillating mode cooled everyone at various seating positions and that was on lowest setting. Not silent by any means, quite a high pitched fan sound. But acceptable. Just remember, the cooling feeling come entirely from the ability to perspire much better in a breeze, so drink copious amounts of water during heatwaves.

Then again I remember the big pedestal fan my mother used to have, it also cooled the whole room with its big oscillating fan blade. But that design no longer looks 'cool' these days
slimy3115/08/2020 19:08

Is this the 30 w;https://www.toolstation.com/desk-fan/p56887If so, that's …Is this the 30 w;https://www.toolstation.com/desk-fan/p56887If so, that's 15 cubic m/m, rather than the 13 of the 25w. The other aspect is that at least for me that 30w is entirely out of stock, no delivery option and no collection options at least near me. It could be that they're replacing the 30w one with the 25w one?


yes, those were the two i looked at. i had mistakenly thought the cubic air per minute was the same on both. so it does appear that the 30W is more powerful than the 25W as i had thought may be the case, but it confused me when i thought the cubic air was the same.
deleted116305615/08/2020 19:13

sorry for being pedantic but your last sentence is incorrect and power …sorry for being pedantic but your last sentence is incorrect and power rating does actually define how powerful it is (by definition)what you actually mean is efficiency and effectivity


Yep, given that I'm normally the pedantic one I'm surprised I let that one through!
You want a one million watt air cooler
deleted116305615/08/2020 19:13

sorry for being pedantic but your last sentence is incorrect and power …sorry for being pedantic but your last sentence is incorrect and power rating does actually define how powerful it is (by definition)what you actually mean is efficiency and effectivity


No it isn't. Words have multiple meanings. He was clearly using power rating in the technical sense in the first instance to refer to energy per second, while the second instance using it in the more general sense to refer to how much oomph something has.
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