Desktop PC - Graphics Card - Advice, Help and recommendation

8
Posted 8th Mar
Hello,

1) I wanted to ask, could someone please tell me if this Graphics card would fit in this PC?

GPU: ebay.co.uk/itm…317

PC: ebay.co.uk/itm…6LU



2) How did you find the above answer out? Like what sort of information and where did you look and where would I look?


3) For that PC - What kind of GPUS would fit and would you recommend for a budget of £30-45 (Not for gaming, but light old gaming and just need a simple GPU)




4) How do you benchmark GPUs - CPU Benchmarking is a great site and idiotproof for CPU's, but the problem with this site is videocardbenchmark.net/ - when I enter a GPU, it defaults sometimes to the 2GB Version. What if the one I want to compare, has only 1gb.

Thank you
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pcpartpicker.com/list/ add all the parts here and it will till you if its compatible
Generally graphics card compatibility depends on physical size. There are two heights of expansion cards and several slot lengths, plus a lot of more powerful graphics cards these days no longer respect the standard length, width and height.

Looking at the back of that machine it clearly takes full height (instead of low profile/half height) cards and with 7 expansion slots on a standard desktop at least one of them will be x16 (the longest slot that's normally used by graphics cards). There's an amount of space above the card slots too so the most likely issue to occur there is length and the card you're considering isn't very long.

PCI-Express is backwards and forwards compatible and has been the standard long enough that there's unlikely to be any electrical or protocol compatibility issues.

The other consideration is whether the power supply has sufficient spare capacity and, for cards that burn large amounts of power, the necessary extra power connectors.


Any sort of syntheric benchmark like passmark, whether for CPUs or GPUs, is only any good as a general guide to show which models are miles ahead of others. Actual performance varies on a program by program basis depending on what type of calculations they do. Models with small differences (10-20%) in these sorts of syntheric tests should be considered as the same performance.

The best benchmarks to look at are those for the program and workload you're using. Or if it's a variety of different applications like buying a card for gaming then looking at results across a selection of them is the way to go.
Physical size and psu are the only real restrictions, every standard mobo in the last 10+ years is pci-e so should have the correct connection.
EndlessWaves08/03/2020 14:35

Generally graphics card compatibility depends on physical size. There are …Generally graphics card compatibility depends on physical size. There are two heights of expansion cards and several slot lengths, plus a lot of more powerful graphics cards these days no longer respect the standard length, width and height.Looking at the back of that machine it clearly takes full height (instead of low profile/half height) cards and with 7 expansion slots on a standard desktop at least one of them will be x16 (the longest slot that's normally used by graphics cards). There's an amount of space above the card slots too so the most likely issue to occur there is length and the card you're considering isn't very long.PCI-Express is backwards and forwards compatible and has been the standard long enough that there's unlikely to be any electrical or protocol compatibility issues.The other consideration is whether the power supply has sufficient spare capacity and, for cards that burn large amounts of power, the necessary extra power connectors. Any sort of syntheric benchmark like passmark, whether for CPUs or GPUs, is only any good as a general guide to show which models are miles ahead of others. Actual performance varies on a program by program basis depending on what type of calculations they do. Models with small differences (10-20%) in these sorts of syntheric tests should be considered as the same performance.The best benchmarks to look at are those for the program and workload you're using. Or if it's a variety of different applications like buying a card for gaming then looking at results across a selection of them is the way to go.


Hi thank you for that, very helpful!
Would that card that I have listed be fine for my machine?
Thanks
I'm saying no because that pc is small form factor so i'm assuming it needs a low profile gpu.

Also you need to avoid power hungry gpus, so you need a low profile card that's powered by the pci bus, so that's nvidia.

I'd probably have a look at a 1050, as i had one a few years back that was bus powered although even 2nd hand you'll struggle to get one within your budget. Might have to drop down to a 1030.
Edited by: "m1keyp1key" 9th Mar
m1keyp1key09/03/2020 16:04

I'm saying no because that pc is small form factor so i'm assuming it …I'm saying no because that pc is small form factor so i'm assuming it needs a low profile gpu. Also you need to avoid power hungry gpus, so you need a low profile card that's powered by the pci bus, so that's nvidia. I'd probably have a look at a 1050, as i had one a few years back that was bus powered although even 2nd hand you'll struggle to get one within your budget. Might have to drop down to a 1030.


That is a micro-atx tower, not SFF
However, I don't know if that GPU require external power. I would suggest you look for GTX 750ti. Used one could be found under £50 if you bid on ebay.
Cisco06060609/03/2020 17:15

That is a micro-atx tower, not SFFHowever, I don't know if that GPU …That is a micro-atx tower, not SFFHowever, I don't know if that GPU require external power. I would suggest you look for GTX 750ti. Used one could be found under £50 if you bid on ebay.




when I search eBay I get some with two fans, some with one, some with Nvidea, Zodic, ASU’s?

arre they all 750ti, what’s the difference?
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