Do all employers ask for references?

24
Found 10th Feb 2013
I ask because on my CV it stated provided on request. Despite getting the job after only 3 hours of the interview (confirmed by phone and email), they haven't ask for me to provide them. The company is relatively small, why would they not ask for references? Even if the person hired is deemed suitable, shouldn't they check just to make sure everything I say is correct?

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24 Comments

Once you start working for them you may find out the reason that they were prepared to engage you so readily

Original Poster

Is that good or bad?

WoolyM

Once you start working for them you may find out the reason that they … Once you start working for them you may find out the reason that they were prepared to engage you so readily


A lot of companies don't check but some do.. have you lied on your CV OP?

Civic EG6

Is that good or bad?


Time will tell. But it may not be good.

Original Poster

If I lied why would I be making a thread about why are they not checking?

haritori

A lot of companies don't check but some do.. have you lied on your CV OP?


I thought companies check references after you start work. That's been my experience (people being called into the office for dismissal within the trial period for bad reference)

WoolyM

Once you start working for them you may find out the reason that they … Once you start working for them you may find out the reason that they were prepared to engage you so readily



Yeah, sounds like sales to me, cold calling perhaps.

Original Poster

No chance, I stay away from that ****.

fuzzydunlop

Yeah, sounds like sales to me, cold calling perhaps.


Civic EG6

No chance, I stay away from that ****.



Sorry, just thought it unusual to hear within 3 hours. Good luck with it anyway

Well from my experience, my work place wouldn't let me start before they received all references.

What is the job? Did you get a contract?

Original Poster

Yes I got a contract. Research in the physics sector.

IamMT

What is the job? Did you get a contract?


From experience, they would not ask you for the references any way. They approach the referees direct. As you have presumably provided details of previous employers they would phone or write to them. Some companies set more store by references than others. Some prefer to see how you work and fit in. It often depends on the type of work you are going to be doing.

Original Poster

How would they know which of my Uni lecturers to contact?

Elvira

From experience, they would not ask you for the references any way. They … From experience, they would not ask you for the references any way. They approach the referees direct. As you have presumably provided details of previous employers they would phone or write to them. Some companies set more store by references than others. Some prefer to see how you work and fit in. It often depends on the type of work you are going to be doing.


WoolyM

Time will tell. But it may not be good.



The speed at which they hire you is irrelevant. Sometimes you just stand out as a candidate.

My first job after uni, the first interview went well and I was told there would be a second if I was successful. Not long after that interview I was offered the job, no second interview. There was nothing wrong with the company.

Besides, I'm not sure if there's any value in reference anymore. Isn't it illegal to give a bad one?

Civic EG6

Yes I got a contract. Research in the physics sector.



I got my job offer within an hour after the interview so it is not unusual I would say. Some employers do extensive background checks which might take months but they would let you start work straight away if your immediate access can't cause any problems for them. It varies a lot so I won't be worried and simply let the employer do their job and won't alarm them by asking about their referencing system

steve01980

The speed at which they hire you is irrelevant. Sometimes you just stand … The speed at which they hire you is irrelevant. Sometimes you just stand out as a candidate. My first job after uni, the first interview went well and I was told there would be a second if I was successful. Not long after that interview I was offered the job, no second interview. There was nothing wrong with the company. Besides, I'm not sure if there's any value in reference anymore. Isn't it illegal to give a bad one?



Yes, in writing no-one gives a bad reference that's why many employers do it over the phone to get a real picture. A referee's tone is normally sufficient to tell if there is something wrong with the candidate and the employer can dig deeper into it through other means.

When I do our graduate recruitment I don't check with graduate referees - I wouldn't listen to what their personal tutor had to say

Sounds interesting, good luck!

If you have a probation period as most companies do, they could use bad references then if they don't like you for whatever reason? I have never had to wait for references to come back before starting a job and just assumed they came ok, if they asked for them. If your referees are your university lecturers, they are probably unlikely to have any real thoughts on your employability, either way. Good luck with the job, hope it goes well.

steve01980

The speed at which they hire you is irrelevant. Sometimes you just stand … The speed at which they hire you is irrelevant. Sometimes you just stand out as a candidate. My first job after uni, the first interview went well and I was told there would be a second if I was successful. Not long after that interview I was offered the job, no second interview. There was nothing wrong with the company. Besides, I'm not sure if there's any value in reference anymore. Isn't it illegal to give a bad one?



No.

pied_piper

Yes, in writing no-one gives a bad reference that's why many employers do … Yes, in writing no-one gives a bad reference that's why many employers do it over the phone to get a real picture. A referee's tone is normally sufficient to tell if there is something wrong with the candidate and the employer can dig deeper into it through other means.



It isn't illegal to give a bad reference, why would it be illegal to tell the truth about an ex employee. The key word there is truth, if it isn't 100% accurate then it opens the employer up for being sued.

For example: If Joe bloggs had 55 days off sick in the last working year, then the ex employer can state that as it is 100% accurate.
Its a bad reference, but its allowed because its accurate.

jonny619447

It isn't illegal to give a bad reference, why would it be illegal to tell … It isn't illegal to give a bad reference, why would it be illegal to tell the truth about an ex employee. The key word there is truth, if it isn't 100% accurate then it opens the employer up for being sued. For example: If Joe bloggs had 55 days off sick in the last working year, then the ex employer can state that as it is 100% accurate. Its a bad reference, but its allowed because its accurate.



Giving info about sick leaves in no way creates a bad impression. The new employer might simply find out if there is a medical history which will prevent the employee from working in the role. I know loads of people who had an accident or a surgery resulting in too may sick leaves.

Also I really do not find any point in checking references other than the previous employers as you always get a biased view as the references provided are only those people who will always say good about the candidate.

jonny619447

It isn't illegal to give a bad reference, why would it be illegal to tell … It isn't illegal to give a bad reference, why would it be illegal to tell the truth about an ex employee. The key word there is truth, if it isn't 100% accurate then it opens the employer up for being sued. For example: If Joe bloggs had 55 days off sick in the last working year, then the ex employer can state that as it is 100% accurate. Its a bad reference, but its allowed because its accurate.



Sorry, giving bad references is not illegal but employers don't tend to give bad references, due to legal complexities in case they are challenged in the court to prove the authenticity of their bad reference, unless you are sacked for gross misconduct etc, that's what I have seen so far which may be just only a small part of the usual practices.

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