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Do I have to have a cctv in use sticker on my car

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Found 1st Mar 2014
Hi I am driving instructor and in order to protect myself and my business against bogus claims I am looking to install front and rear cctv cameras in the car.but have been told by a fellow instructor that in order for footage to be used by the police/ in court you have to display a notice informing people that they are being filmed. Anyone know what is the true legal situation?

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7 Comments

Bogus claims would be dealt with directly by the insurance companies and those are civilian individuals making a decision based upon common sense on the information presented so the courts side is a non issue.

The problems only really occur for law enforcement agencies who end up filming someone when there was a reasonable expectation of privacy. The legislation is the 'regulation of investigatory powers act' (ripa) of 2000, it doesn't apply to civilians though. A sticker is not necessary, but may help to focus the minds of those around you?

All driving instructor cars round my way, have a tiny sticker in top left hand corner on back saying CCTV in use

Just checked the DPA - on second thoughts, get a sticker to be safe...

Original Poster

Thanks all responders. Will have to now source a sticker for car

you can make your own sign... doesn't have to be a bought one. I printed of a cctv picture I got of the internet and display that... police are happy with it.

Hi I am driving instructor and in order to protect myself and my business against bogus claims I am looking to install front and rear cctv cameras in the car.but have been told by a fellow instructor that in order for footage to be used by the police/ in court you have to display a notice informing people that they are being filmed. Anyone know what is the true legal situation?

NOPE you do not need any form of signage whatsoever. You are entitled to film in public places and NOBODY has the right to expect any form of privacy in a public place. If you were filming the inside of your car which is a place of business then probably so.

One of Britain's most senior police officers has told forces across the country they have no right to stop people taking pictures in public.

Chief Constable Andy Trotter said the practice was unacceptable and undermined public confidence in the service.

His remarks follow a series of cases in which officers have ordered both amateur and professional photographers to delete images, often giving terrorism laws as their reason for doing so.

Trotter, chairman of the Association of Chief Police Officers' media advisory group, told forces in a letter:

"There have been a number of recent instances highlighted in the press where officers have detained photographers and deleted images from their cameras.

"I seek your support in reminding your officers and staff that they should not prevent anyone from taking photographs in public.

"This applies equally to members of the media and public seeking to record images, who do not need a permit to photograph or film in public places."

ACPO guidance states: "There are no powers prohibiting the taking of photographs, film or digital images in a public place.

"Therefore members of the public and press should not be prevented from doing so.

"We need to cooperate with the media and amateur photographers. They play a vital role as their images help us identify criminals.

"We must acknowledge that citizen journalism is a feature of modern life and police officers are now photographed and filmed more than ever.

"Unnecessarily restricting photography, whether for the casual tourist or professional is unacceptable and it undermines public confidence in the police service.

"Once an image has been recorded, the police have no power to delete or confiscate it without a court order."

Trotter's reminder of the law to forces across the country comes two months after photographer Carmen Valino was threatened with arrest and handcuffing by a police sergeant as she took pictures for Hackney Gazette at a murder scene in east London.
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