Do I need air bricks??

20
Found 10th Dec 2011
Just a quick question. I have 2 air bricks in my kitchen, which at this time of the year makes it very cold. Can these be done away with/covered?? My combi boiler is on the kitchen wall, but does not require external ventilation(apart from the flue). We have solid ground floor.
Any help please
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20 Comments
If it is a Condensing Combi boiler you have then no you do not need the ventilation. If its a older type Combi boiler that isn't condensing then you will need to keep the ventilation there.
Banned
I'm no expert but pretty sure it's a really bad idea to do away with air bricks, damp and condensation etc.

U may need to heat that area more.
Cover them up and open the windows. HTH.
Original Poster
Combi is condensing, states in manual that it doesn't need ventilation. more concerned about damp issues??
I have 2 air bricks in my kitchen, we covered them with plastic grills that have open and close option, didn't want to do away with them in case of any problems with condensation. up to now working very well hope this helps
whatsThePoint

just cover them and if anyone dies in the next few days of carbon … just cover them and if anyone dies in the next few days of carbon monoxide poisoning just uncover them again and try not to look guilty



Or just take the advice from my first post.
Air bricks are usually used to air the foundations of a property. Usually at floor level or below. Do not cover these as it will lead to damp in the foundations of the house. If they are elsewhere it is probably to allow ventilation.
If you remove these you may well get damp patches forming due to condensation.
It will be ok to cover them temporarily but for the longer term they are probably there for a reason.
Edited by: "WoolyM" 10th Dec 2011
Original Poster
gonna buy a couple of 'flood' protection covers, then if i notice any problem, can easily be removed
webby443

gonna buy a couple of 'flood' protection covers, then if i notice any … gonna buy a couple of 'flood' protection covers, then if i notice any problem, can easily be removed


So you are talking about air bricks for the foundations then?
You should really be looking at increasing insulation in the house. Have you got wooden floors or carpets?
never mind the air bricks. the culprit will be the letter box. it has a lot to answer to in my house, also them windows are over rated get rid of them. plus the door.
Just get one of these

http://thehut.pantherssl.com/productimg/0/600/600/30/30002030-1307699669-423901.jpg
If you have air bircks there, they are there for a reason. If they are located in the subfloor (under floor boards) then they will be there to avoid damp in that area. You have a solid floor, therefore they are there to prevent condensation/provide ventilation for the previously installed boiler. As long as you have adequate ventilation (extract fan/windows open) and heating then you do not need them as you have a room sealed boiler.

HTH
Edited by: "Foxy102" 10th Dec 2011
Gas cooker?
^^^^fair point. Forgot about the cooker situation, although if the room volume is over 10m3 then you don't need a vent.
Edited by: "Foxy102" 10th Dec 2011
Yes if you have gas appliances you should have ventilation. Many UPVC windows put in kitchens have vents in the top so wall mounted air vents are not required.
When I was 14 I was having a lovely hot bath. I laid back, the smell of Matey Bubble bath enveloping me and the lingering scent of Camay soap on my skin. I momentarily opened my eyes from my relaxed dozing and my eyes were drawn to the air brick further up the wall.

A long black stick was poking out and jabbing wildly in the air. I suddenly realised that it wasn't a stick but a ruddy humungous spider leg. I screamed, jumped out of the bath, creating a deluge of water on the bathroom floor.

Both my parents came to my aid, my dad armed with his size 12 slipper as he knew all too well that my screaming could only mean one thing, a spider. My mum followed up the stairs closely behind clasping a jam jar and a sturdy piece of cardboard as she was much kinder in her removal of spiders from the house.

My parents were now faced with the dilemma of my refusing to ever set foot in the bathroom again until the air brick or spider hole as I now referred to it as being, was blocked up.

The massive spider with the dangling leg/arm was too big to ease itself through the holes in the air brick but I was hysterical in the knowledge that slightly smaller ones could gain access.

My mother thus saved the day and the cost of removing the air brick and subsequent redecoration by ingeniously raiding her sewing cupboard and cutting up a spare net curtain into rectangular pieces which were then glued over the air bricks in the house, thus allowing air in but keeping spiders out.

Don't get rid of air bricks as they serve to ventilated the house and prevent mould spores which can be a cause of depression as well as wrecking your home.
MoneyEyes

If it is a Condensing Combi boiler you have then no you do not need the … If it is a Condensing Combi boiler you have then no you do not need the ventilation. If its a older type Combi boiler that isn't condensing then you will need to keep the ventilation there.


no combi boilers require ventillation unless they are in a cupboard. don't know why you think a condensing one would be any different from a normal combi in the way of ventillation?

Only differnce is the flue gas temeratures are lower as it has a seconday heat exchanger
Edited by: "souljacker" 10th Dec 2011
Original Poster
WoolyM

So you are talking about air bricks for the foundations then? You should … So you are talking about air bricks for the foundations then? You should really be looking at increasing insulation in the house. Have you got wooden floors or carpets?


Air bricks are couple of feet off the ground. We have concrete ground floor(carpeted) so i presume they were vents for the previous boiler (non combi)

Edited by: "webby443" 10th Dec 2011
souljacker

no combi boilers require ventillation unless they are in a cupboard. … no combi boilers require ventillation unless they are in a cupboard. don't know why you think a condensing one would be any different from a normal combi in the way of ventillation? Only differnce is the flue gas temeratures are lower as it has a seconday heat exchanger



Some non condensing boilers require ventilation, read some of the manuals. I've worked in Heating and Plumbing long enough to know..
I've been a heating engineer working on gas and oil boilers for 20 years and know for a fact no room sealed boiler, condensing or not requires an air vent unless in a compartment

Conventional flue ones do.
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