Do I need fabric conditioner?

53
Found 24th Oct 2017
I have always added fabric conditioner to all of my washing, a cup each time, because this is what my mum did and so I just did what she did. However over the last year, I wondered what these conditioner actually do?

I reduced the liquid to 1/4 of a cup each time and don't notice any difference. I then stopped using it for a trouser wash and thought that the trousers felt a bit stiff when they came out of the wash, but I may have imagined this rather than it being actual.

Does everyone use fabric conditioner and would recommend them or not?

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You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the internet every time an insignificant change to your life looms.

Original Poster

RossD894 m ago

You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the …You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the internet every time an insignificant change to your life looms.


no i can't make my own decisions. i am indecisive. i also want to know if other people have done their washing without fabric conditioner and it don't matter any way. i could certainly try to do my washing without the conditioner and test this out myself but i am prone to imagining things when they are not actual so i can not rely on my own judgement.
53 Comments

Lots of modern sportswear ,fleeces etc specifically tell you not to use fabric conditioner as it clogs up the pores in those garments . This leads to downgrading of insulation, wicking etc . Also if you have lightweight, breathable waterproofs conditioner clogs up some micropores rendering the garment ineffective .

Having said that stuff does smell nicer and appear softer, so I tend to use it with natural fibres (cotton bed linen , wool jumpers etc) but not on man made fibres , especially technical sports gear , fleeces and wicking socks .

Original Poster

rogparki5 m ago

Lots of modern sportswear ,fleeces etc specifically tell you not to use …Lots of modern sportswear ,fleeces etc specifically tell you not to use fabric conditioner as it clogs up the pores in those garments . This leads to downgrading of insulation, wicking etc . Also if you have lightweight, breathable waterproofs conditioner clogs up some micropores rendering the garment ineffective .Having said that stuff does smell nicer and appear softer, so I tend to use it with natural fibres (cotton bed linen , wool jumpers etc) but not on man made fibres , especially technical sports gear , fleeces and wicking socks .


i indiscriminately add conditioner to everything except woolen wash. i don't notice any smell on the washed clothes from the conditioner, although I do note the tv adverts often have someone sniffing the washed washing and smiling and commenting on how soft it is, but this may be just advertising gimmick.

"Do I need fabric conditioner?"

No.

I used to use it occasionally, but then I realised there was no difference so stopped using it.

You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the internet every time an insignificant change to your life looms.

Original Poster

RossD894 m ago

You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the …You can make your own decisions, you know. You don't need to consult the internet every time an insignificant change to your life looms.


no i can't make my own decisions. i am indecisive. i also want to know if other people have done their washing without fabric conditioner and it don't matter any way. i could certainly try to do my washing without the conditioner and test this out myself but i am prone to imagining things when they are not actual so i can not rely on my own judgement.

I gave up using it about five years ago. I can't tell the difference.

You don't even need washing powder. I don't use it but friends rave about the Eco Egg wash ball.

I use it but only because I feel it does make the clothes feel softer (forgot to put in in a wash last week and felt the difference when I wore the clothes).
Plus, I like my clothes to smell nice and the conditioner certainly makes a difference there too.

Maybe you should let your husband do the washing, you stick to replacing showers, removing tiles/taps etc

Don't put it on towels (if you are) as it prevents them from drying you. We use it for all suitable washes, but only about a tablespoon. I wonder how much soap powder you are using, because around a tablespoon is enough these days ( I think modern powders have moved on somewhat). If you are still doing as your mum did you might be using to much. Our washing machine tells you when you've used to much powder and is surprisingly easy to do so.

Original Poster

Pandamansays33 m ago

Don't put it on towels (if you are) as it prevents them from drying you. …Don't put it on towels (if you are) as it prevents them from drying you. We use it for all suitable washes, but only about a tablespoon. I wonder how much soap powder you are using, because around a tablespoon is enough these days ( I think modern powders have moved on somewhat). If you are still doing as your mum did you might be using to much. Our washing machine tells you when you've used to much powder and is surprisingly easy to do so.


i find the towels are fine and not affected by the conditioner. i don't use washing powder, only washing capsules. i don't know if this itself makes the washing smell nice as the box claims they do. i just chuck one capsule in for each wash.

Original Poster

andynicol35 m ago

Maybe you should let your husband do the washing, you stick to replacing …Maybe you should let your husband do the washing, you stick to replacing showers, removing tiles/taps etc


if i rely on my husband doing the washing, we won't have any clean clothes to wear!

I use a bottle cap full of conditioner in most washes, but never when washing towels as the conditioner effects the cotton fibre and deteriorates the pile.

When you introduce any substances to your body you run the risk of either adverse reaction or long term harm. The world spun happy for many years without things like conditioners for clothes or hair. The are far too many unneeded chemical now in people houses and it's going to come back to hurt us and probably is hurting now with the increase of disorder and allergic reactions. But in the end all these things find their way in to the rivers then the sea and then into the food we eat.

If you don't need it don't use it, the cost money saving is a bonus.

PulisOut36 m ago

When you introduce any substances to your body you run the risk of either …When you introduce any substances to your body you run the risk of either adverse reaction or long term harm. The world spun happy for many years without things like conditioners for clothes or hair. The are far too many unneeded chemical now in people houses and it's going to come back to hurt us and probably is hurting now with the increase of disorder and allergic reactions. But in the end all these things find their way in to the rivers then the sea and then into the food we eat.If you don't need it don't use it, the cost money saving is a bonus.

Seriously? I ate beetroot for the first time yesterday. Am I doomed?
Take your tinfoil hat and away with you.

craigstephens4 m ago

Seriously? I ate beetroot for the first time yesterday. Am I doomed?Take …Seriously? I ate beetroot for the first time yesterday. Am I doomed?Take your tinfoil hat and away with you.


Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric softeners include:

• Chloroform: This substance was used as an anesthesia in the 1800s up through the early 1900s when its potential for causing fatal cardiac arrhythmia was discovered. A carcinogenic neurotoxin, it is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. Inhaling its vapors may cause loss of consciousness, nausea, headache, vomiting, and/or dizziness, drowsiness. It may aggravate disorders of the heart, kidneys or liver. Its effects worsen when subjected to heat.

• A-Terpineol: Causes Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, meaning problems relating to the brain and spine such as Alzheimer's disease, ADD, dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, seizures, strokes, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Early symptoms of CNS problems include aphasia, blurred vision, disorientation, dizziness, headaches, hunger, memory loss, numbness in face, pain in neck and spine. A-Terpineol also irritates the mucous membranes and, if aspirated into the lungs, can cause respiratory depression, pneumonia or fatal edema.

• Benzyl Alcohol: This upper respiratory tract irritant can cause central nervous system (CNS) disorders, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and dramatic drops in blood pressure.

• Benzyl Acetate: This substances has been linked to pancreatic cancer. Its vapors can be irritating to eyes and respiratory passages and it can also be absorbed through the skin.

• Ethanol: Another fabric softener ingredient which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list and linked to CNS disorders.

• Pentane: A chemical known to be harmful if inhaled.

• Ethyl Acetate: This substance, which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list, can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. It may also cause severe headaches and loss of consciousness, as well as damage to the liver and kidneys.

• Camphor: Another substance on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. It is easily absorbed through body tissue, causing irritation of eyes, nose and throat. Camphor can also cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions.

• Linalool: A narcotic known to cause respiratory problems and CNS disorders. In animal testing, exposure to linalool has resulted in death.

• Phthalates: Used in scented products to help the scent last longer, phthlates have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive system problems.

• Limonene: This known carcinogen can cause irritation to eyes and skin.

PulisOut1 h, 0 m ago

Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric …Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric softeners include:• Chloroform: This substance was used as an anesthesia in the 1800s up through the early 1900s when its potential for causing fatal cardiac arrhythmia was discovered. A carcinogenic neurotoxin, it is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. Inhaling its vapors may cause loss of consciousness, nausea, headache, vomiting, and/or dizziness, drowsiness. It may aggravate disorders of the heart, kidneys or liver. Its effects worsen when subjected to heat.• A-Terpineol: Causes Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, meaning problems relating to the brain and spine such as Alzheimer's disease, ADD, dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, seizures, strokes, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Early symptoms of CNS problems include aphasia, blurred vision, disorientation, dizziness, headaches, hunger, memory loss, numbness in face, pain in neck and spine. A-Terpineol also irritates the mucous membranes and, if aspirated into the lungs, can cause respiratory depression, pneumonia or fatal edema.• Benzyl Alcohol: This upper respiratory tract irritant can cause central nervous system (CNS) disorders, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and dramatic drops in blood pressure.• Benzyl Acetate: This substances has been linked to pancreatic cancer. Its vapors can be irritating to eyes and respiratory passages and it can also be absorbed through the skin.• Ethanol: Another fabric softener ingredient which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list and linked to CNS disorders.• Pentane: A chemical known to be harmful if inhaled.• Ethyl Acetate: This substance, which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list, can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. It may also cause severe headaches and loss of consciousness, as well as damage to the liver and kidneys.• Camphor: Another substance on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. It is easily absorbed through body tissue, causing irritation of eyes, nose and throat. Camphor can also cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions.• Linalool: A narcotic known to cause respiratory problems and CNS disorders. In animal testing, exposure to linalool has resulted in death.• Phthalates: Used in scented products to help the scent last longer, phthlates have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive system problems.• Limonene: This known carcinogen can cause irritation to eyes and skin.

I stand by my comment.

Original Poster

PulisOut1 h, 9 m ago

Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric …Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric softeners include:• Chloroform: This substance was used as an anesthesia in the 1800s up through the early 1900s when its potential for causing fatal cardiac arrhythmia was discovered. A carcinogenic neurotoxin, it is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. Inhaling its vapors may cause loss of consciousness, nausea, headache, vomiting, and/or dizziness, drowsiness. It may aggravate disorders of the heart, kidneys or liver. Its effects worsen when subjected to heat.• A-Terpineol: Causes Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, meaning problems relating to the brain and spine such as Alzheimer's disease, ADD, dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, seizures, strokes, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Early symptoms of CNS problems include aphasia, blurred vision, disorientation, dizziness, headaches, hunger, memory loss, numbness in face, pain in neck and spine. A-Terpineol also irritates the mucous membranes and, if aspirated into the lungs, can cause respiratory depression, pneumonia or fatal edema.• Benzyl Alcohol: This upper respiratory tract irritant can cause central nervous system (CNS) disorders, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and dramatic drops in blood pressure.• Benzyl Acetate: This substances has been linked to pancreatic cancer. Its vapors can be irritating to eyes and respiratory passages and it can also be absorbed through the skin.• Ethanol: Another fabric softener ingredient which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list and linked to CNS disorders.• Pentane: A chemical known to be harmful if inhaled.• Ethyl Acetate: This substance, which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list, can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. It may also cause severe headaches and loss of consciousness, as well as damage to the liver and kidneys.• Camphor: Another substance on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. It is easily absorbed through body tissue, causing irritation of eyes, nose and throat. Camphor can also cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions.• Linalool: A narcotic known to cause respiratory problems and CNS disorders. In animal testing, exposure to linalool has resulted in death.• Phthalates: Used in scented products to help the scent last longer, phthlates have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive system problems.• Limonene: This known carcinogen can cause irritation to eyes and skin.


thanks. this is enough for me to stop using conditioner. i have very sensitive skin but i haven't reacted to conditioner, although i only use the well known brands. i use very little conditioner now but i just feel i need to because i always have done but if so little is used, i might as well not bother.

Original Poster

windym7 h, 10 m ago

You don't even need washing powder. I don't use it but friends rave about …You don't even need washing powder. I don't use it but friends rave about the Eco Egg wash ball.


i think this may be going too far, not using washing powder or washing capsules. it is like having a bath with just water!

Has anyone seen mutley and Joey Essex in the same place at the same time
I'm starting to think they are the same person

mutley156 m ago

i think this may be going too far, not using washing powder or washing …i think this may be going too far, not using washing powder or washing capsules. it is like having a bath with just water!


It's not as far fetched as it sounds. I've been putting our washing on without power for years. My partner normally does fills the machine but when I've done it she's never noticed. Way before "organic" and "environmental" were topics I did research on setting up a company selling only "do no harm" products, you would be astounded what ingredients and how many ingredients are not needed in most household products. Vast number only their to make them cheap or more profitable and the vast number of claims made by products is total nonsense.

As for washing powder, for everyday wash it's not needed at all, those wash balls help by making the wash more effective. Certainly more then 50% of all wash power goes down the drain, some of it just builds up in pipes. Some say a small amount of white vinegar in the wash makes the clothes softer but I've never checked that. Certainly vinegar is as good a cleaning solution then anything offered for the kitchen surfaces.

Banned

The eco ball is a good alternative 😁

mutley11 h, 40 m ago

thanks. this is enough for me to stop using conditioner. i have very …thanks. this is enough for me to stop using conditioner. i have very sensitive skin but i haven't reacted to conditioner, although i only use the well known brands. i use very little conditioner now but i just feel i need to because i always have done but if so little is used, i might as well not bother.


It isn't though. It has a slow release detergent inside. Not my thing, but equally not just water.

Anyone ever tried conkers for laundry?

harlzter1 h, 0 m ago

Anyone ever tried conkers for laundry?


The sell strong ridged plastic balls, sort of like golf balls, suppose conkers would just be as good. People think to clean cloth you need something like a chemical reaction but that's not true. All laundry power does is soften the water and apply a light bleach. The rest is the natural action of the fibre being opened and the dirt falling out (being washed out).

This can be tested in a number of ways. One very good example is getting a dirty dry cloth sprinkle or rub chalk into it and the brush the chalk out. The chalk sticks to the chalk and the cloth is cleaned. This is so effective they use that method to remove pencil line of snooker tables. In a similar way soap suds clean carpet better then getting the wet with water.

Original Poster

PulisOut2 h, 43 m ago

It's not as far fetched as it sounds. I've been putting our washing on …It's not as far fetched as it sounds. I've been putting our washing on without power for years. My partner normally does fills the machine but when I've done it she's never noticed. Way before "organic" and "environmental" were topics I did research on setting up a company selling only "do no harm" products, you would be astounded what ingredients and how many ingredients are not needed in most household products. Vast number only their to make them cheap or more profitable and the vast number of claims made by products is total nonsense. As for washing powder, for everyday wash it's not needed at all, those wash balls help by making the wash more effective. Certainly more then 50% of all wash power goes down the drain, some of it just builds up in pipes. Some say a small amount of white vinegar in the wash makes the clothes softer but I've never checked that. Certainly vinegar is as good a cleaning solution then anything offered for the kitchen surfaces.


I told my husband i am going to stop using conditioner and he claims the clothes smells fresher with conditioner. Yeah, right. Like when was the last time he did any washing, or took any notice until i told him just now! I very much doubt the clothes smells any different with or without conditioner.

PulisOut34 m ago

The sell strong ridged plastic balls, sort of like golf balls, suppose …The sell strong ridged plastic balls, sort of like golf balls, suppose conkers would just be as good. People think to clean cloth you need something like a chemical reaction but that's not true. All laundry power does is soften the water and apply a light bleach. The rest is the natural action of the fibre being opened and the dirt falling out (being washed out).This can be tested in a number of ways. One very good example is getting a dirty dry cloth sprinkle or rub chalk into it and the brush the chalk out. The chalk sticks to the chalk and the cloth is cleaned. This is so effective they use that method to remove pencil line of snooker tables. In a similar way soap suds clean carpet better then getting the wet with water.



You use the conkers to make detergent as they contain saponins a natural detergent the same as soapnuts do.

mutley119 m ago

I told my husband i am going to stop using conditioner and he claims the …I told my husband i am going to stop using conditioner and he claims the clothes smells fresher with conditioner. Yeah, right. Like when was the last time he did any washing, or took any notice until i told him just now! I very much doubt the clothes smells any different with or without conditioner.


Put a sprig of lavender in the dryer, all the old biddies will be following him home :-)

Use bold wash as it leaves clothes fresh and smelling nice just like fabric conditioning. On offer at Amazon pantry £7 but spend £20 get £5 off or just pay £7 at homebargins
If you don't then i suggest to carry on but dont use a full lid lol.

Original Poster

Misslovely1 h, 18 m ago

Use bold wash as it leaves clothes fresh and smelling nice just like …Use bold wash as it leaves clothes fresh and smelling nice just like fabric conditioning. On offer at Amazon pantry £7 but spend £20 get £5 off or just pay £7 at homebargins If you don't then i suggest to carry on but dont use a full lid lol.


This is what i am thinking. The capsules i buy come in different fragrance, at least that is what it says on the box, so the fresh smell already comes from that rather than the conditioner. I honestly cannot smell anything on the clothes whether i use a full cup of conditioner or just a quarter cup and i have a very sensitive sense of smell.

i am only using conditioner because i see other people do it, but i am questioning if it does anything at all. I will stop using it and see if it makes any difference

PulisOut17 h, 47 m ago

Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric …Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric softeners include:• Chloroform: This substance was used as an anesthesia in the 1800s up through the early 1900s when its potential for causing fatal cardiac arrhythmia was discovered. A carcinogenic neurotoxin, it is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. Inhaling its vapors may cause loss of consciousness, nausea, headache, vomiting, and/or dizziness, drowsiness. It may aggravate disorders of the heart, kidneys or liver. Its effects worsen when subjected to heat.• A-Terpineol: Causes Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, meaning problems relating to the brain and spine such as Alzheimer's disease, ADD, dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, seizures, strokes, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Early symptoms of CNS problems include aphasia, blurred vision, disorientation, dizziness, headaches, hunger, memory loss, numbness in face, pain in neck and spine. A-Terpineol also irritates the mucous membranes and, if aspirated into the lungs, can cause respiratory depression, pneumonia or fatal edema.• Benzyl Alcohol: This upper respiratory tract irritant can cause central nervous system (CNS) disorders, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and dramatic drops in blood pressure.• Benzyl Acetate: This substances has been linked to pancreatic cancer. Its vapors can be irritating to eyes and respiratory passages and it can also be absorbed through the skin.• Ethanol: Another fabric softener ingredient which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list and linked to CNS disorders.• Pentane: A chemical known to be harmful if inhaled.• Ethyl Acetate: This substance, which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list, can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. It may also cause severe headaches and loss of consciousness, as well as damage to the liver and kidneys.• Camphor: Another substance on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. It is easily absorbed through body tissue, causing irritation of eyes, nose and throat. Camphor can also cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions.• Linalool: A narcotic known to cause respiratory problems and CNS disorders. In animal testing, exposure to linalool has resulted in death.• Phthalates: Used in scented products to help the scent last longer, phthlates have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive system problems.• Limonene: This known carcinogen can cause irritation to eyes and skin.


Considering all the products that are used by humans contain tested substances this is just the usual scaremongering fake stuff (yes, even the cruelty free ones are tested. The company might not test on animals or whatever themselves but no one can use untested substances in any products so they simply use substances that others have already deemed safe).
I don't see how they would be permitted to use substances that have been proved without a doubt to cause cancer and so on
It sounds like the comments I read every now and then about people saying coke corrodes the stomach because it contains phosphoric acid lol.
Edited by: "hearts22" 25th Oct 2017

PulisOut17 h, 50 m ago

Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric …Some of the harmful ingredients commonly found in liquid or sheet fabric softeners include:• Chloroform: This substance was used as an anesthesia in the 1800s up through the early 1900s when its potential for causing fatal cardiac arrhythmia was discovered. A carcinogenic neurotoxin, it is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. Inhaling its vapors may cause loss of consciousness, nausea, headache, vomiting, and/or dizziness, drowsiness. It may aggravate disorders of the heart, kidneys or liver. Its effects worsen when subjected to heat.• A-Terpineol: Causes Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, meaning problems relating to the brain and spine such as Alzheimer's disease, ADD, dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, seizures, strokes, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Early symptoms of CNS problems include aphasia, blurred vision, disorientation, dizziness, headaches, hunger, memory loss, numbness in face, pain in neck and spine. A-Terpineol also irritates the mucous membranes and, if aspirated into the lungs, can cause respiratory depression, pneumonia or fatal edema.• Benzyl Alcohol: This upper respiratory tract irritant can cause central nervous system (CNS) disorders, headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and dramatic drops in blood pressure.• Benzyl Acetate: This substances has been linked to pancreatic cancer. Its vapors can be irritating to eyes and respiratory passages and it can also be absorbed through the skin.• Ethanol: Another fabric softener ingredient which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list and linked to CNS disorders.• Pentane: A chemical known to be harmful if inhaled.• Ethyl Acetate: This substance, which is on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list, can be irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract. It may also cause severe headaches and loss of consciousness, as well as damage to the liver and kidneys.• Camphor: Another substance on the EPA's Hazardous Waste list. It is easily absorbed through body tissue, causing irritation of eyes, nose and throat. Camphor can also cause dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions.• Linalool: A narcotic known to cause respiratory problems and CNS disorders. In animal testing, exposure to linalool has resulted in death.• Phthalates: Used in scented products to help the scent last longer, phthlates have been linked to breast cancer and reproductive system problems.• Limonene: This known carcinogen can cause irritation to eyes and skin.


"The ingredient in question is limonene, which is used to give citric-scented candles their aroma. In its unaltered state limonene is considered so safe that it is used to flavour food, as well to give cleaning products and air fresheners a lemony scent."

From a Telegraph article... It's not carcinogenic per se lol.
This is just an example of how people in general distort stuff to spread fake scaremongering news.

mutley111 h, 26 m ago

This is what i am thinking. The capsules i buy come in different …This is what i am thinking. The capsules i buy come in different fragrance, at least that is what it says on the box, so the fresh smell already comes from that rather than the conditioner. I honestly cannot smell anything on the clothes whether i use a full cup of conditioner or just a quarter cup and i have a very sensitive sense of smell.i am only using conditioner because i see other people do it, but i am questioning if it does anything at all. I will stop using it and see if it makes any difference


I can't say I notice any difference...
Asking others anyway is not gonna get you any universal truth as this is subjective stuff. Sense of smell in people varies a lot for example.
Edited by: "hearts22" 25th Oct 2017

hearts2233 m ago

Considering all the products that are used by humans contain tested …Considering all the products that are used by humans contain tested substances this is just the usual scaremongering fake stuff (yes, even the cruelty free ones are tested. The company might not test on animals or whatever themselves but no one can use untested substances in any products so they simply use substances that others have already deemed safe).I don't see how they would be permitted to use substances that have been proved without a doubt to cause cancer and so on :/It sounds like the comments I read every now and then about people saying coke corrodes the stomach because it contains phosphoric acid lol.


Well until very recently we all thought we had strong fire safety rules didn't we ? when your health depends on companies who stretch everything to make more profit it's best you understand and do your own research I think. And it's not that these products don't contain things that do harm, they are claimed safe by the amount they contain. No reference is made to any build up over the year both first hand or second, third hand in children.

PulisOut13 m ago

Well until very recently we all thought we had strong fire safety rules …Well until very recently we all thought we had strong fire safety rules didn't we ? when your health depends on companies who stretch everything to make more profit it's best you understand and do your own research I think. And it's not that these products don't contain things that do harm, they are claimed safe by the amount they contain. No reference is made to any build up over the year both first hand or second, third hand in children.


The thing is I gave you an example of how a substance is declared carcinogenic by scaremongering people when the substance in itself isn't and been proved to be safe. It was found to turn into formaldehyde in burning scented candles and potentially have carcinogenic effects, which isn't the same as saying limonene is carcinogenic. Never seen fabric conditioner being burned while in the washing machine...
When you have scientific proof that isn't some blog online or generic quoted study or YouTube video that something has been found carcinogenic then I'll believe you (you in general).

I am sure some substances need to be tested regarding their long-term effects but I don't agree with those who spread fake info. Whatever the subject is. People like to claim this or that is harmful as if it was a fact scientifically proven, when it's not. This is what I'm arguing.

hearts224 h, 27 m ago

The thing is I gave you an example of how a substance is declared …The thing is I gave you an example of how a substance is declared carcinogenic by scaremongering people when the substance in itself isn't and been proved to be safe. It was found to turn into formaldehyde in burning scented candles and potentially have carcinogenic effects, which isn't the same as saying limonene is carcinogenic. Never seen fabric conditioner being burned while in the washing machine... When you have scientific proof that isn't some blog online or generic quoted study or YouTube video that something has been found carcinogenic then I'll believe you (you in general). I am sure some substances need to be tested regarding their long-term effects but I don't agree with those who spread fake info. Whatever the subject is. People like to claim this or that is harmful as if it was a fact scientifically proven, when it's not. This is what I'm arguing.


Totally agree, but I do think your criteria for fact or fiction is a bit stern. You pick out one substance which you have prior knowledge of, if what you say is indeed true I thank you for that. But now I'm in your position, you believe something you have read and expect me to do the same. I think the important point is that people should do their own research if they are concerned but that doesn't mean other can't put forward information. The is a big difference from advising what not to use then what to use, in this case no harm done if everything I posted was untrue.

For the record I don't hunt down this information, I have a general rule that if it's not needed I don't use it (in general). At my age I've seen how companies invent a need to sell a product and I tend on to fall for it and save money on that basis. The OPs question about about need, I just gave the reasons why I don't think it is.

Never used conditioner for years. I do lots of washing and I can't see any difference.

OP, its 3p per wash! For a multiple property multi-millionaire, you aint arf tight!
Edited by: "chocci" 25th Oct 2017

PulisOut1 h, 2 m ago

Totally agree, but I do think your criteria for fact or fiction is a bit …Totally agree, but I do think your criteria for fact or fiction is a bit stern. You pick out one substance which you have prior knowledge of, if what you say is indeed true I thank you for that. But now I'm in your position, you believe something you have read and expect me to do the same. I think the important point is that people should do their own research if they are concerned but that doesn't mean other can't put forward information. The is a big difference from advising what not to use then what to use, in this case no harm done if everything I posted was untrue.For the record I don't hunt down this information, I have a general rule that if it's not needed I don't use it (in general). At my age I've seen how companies invent a need to sell a product and I tend on to fall for it and save money on that basis. The OPs question about about need, I just gave the reasons why I don't think it is.


Limonene is a chemical found in the peels of citrus fruits and in other plants.

As far as I know people use peels as an ingredient all the time (think of zest) so we can agree that it is safe to eat; it can’t become carcinogenic in its unaltered state in shampoos, detergents etc all of a sudden.

Also, you can’t seriously believe all tests carried out are manipulated and people’s health put at risk by every single company that sells products or carries out testing.
People who do that exist but it’s not the norm thankfully.

It depends on what you use to research info. Lots of people for example read some article on a blog that quotes unknown studies or uses false info and share the thing as some kind of scientific evidence.

I agree that some products are unnecessary but unnecessary doesn’t mean harmful in itself.

I will leave it at this and conclude by saying that researching is certainly a good habit to have.
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