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    Do I need to tell my car insurer about a non-damage drive away claim?

    I was parked in a lay-by and a car behind me reversed into me and attempted to drive off. It was a slow, no damage impact, but after some arguments the driver & passenger swapped over, and the person who was originally the passenger got in the driver's seat and drove off at speed.

    I'm sensing either insurance fraud or something else. I've told the police, and have still images and video from my dashcams, plus CCTV, but with there being no damage, do I risk telling the insurance company and having my premiums screwed next year?

    25 Comments

    Could it have been a learner that reversed into you, being taught by a parent/friend or whatever, and hitting you caused the "instructor" to lose their rag, or the driver to get into a bit of a panic?

    Original Poster

    miikeyblue

    Could it have been a learner that reversed into you, being taught by a … Could it have been a learner that reversed into you, being taught by a parent/friend or whatever, and hitting you caused the "instructor" to lose their rag, or the driver to get into a bit of a panic?



    No; from the look of them I'd say they were just two scruffy chavs who were friends and for some reason - either one of them was already wanted by police, or the original driver shouldn't have been in charge of the vehicle, the passenger (who was out of the car telling me there was no damage) got into the car and drove off, leaving the original driver with me. At the time I had no idea who was driving so assumed it was the same person who'd just driven off.

    Best to report it just in case. It is peace of mind.

    Original Poster

    sydney871

    Best to report it just in case. It is peace of mind.



    Assuming they can't and won't claim against me, is there a higher chance of me getting stung due to the fact I am reporting an 'accident', therefore I have to answer "Yes" to the question in the future?

    There is literally no damage, I think a rubber stopper on their car - a Ford Kuga - hit my bumper in just the right place.

    If neither car has any damage, why would you??

    I dont phone my insurance every time i hit a pigeon. Obliged or whatever, realistically whats the point?

    Rich069

    If neither car has any damage, why would you??I dont phone my insurance … If neither car has any damage, why would you??I dont phone my insurance every time i hit a pigeon. Obliged or whatever, realistically whats the point?



    Agreed

    Original Poster

    Rich069

    If neither car has any damage, why would you??I dont phone my insurance … If neither car has any damage, why would you??I dont phone my insurance every time i hit a pigeon. Obliged or whatever, realistically whats the point?



    It's the fact I have reported a crime to the police, so if the insurer ever gets involved and I didn't notify them, that's their reason to crucify me and up the premium next year,

    Contacting Insurance will cost you for the next 3 years , if you have no damage and there is no danger of other driver trying to claim against your policy then don't contact them, yes you are obliged to let them know if an insured event takes place but this is only so they can class you as a higher risk and increase premiums

    I'd report then claim whiplash

    Original Poster

    taylor102081

    I'd report then claim whiplash



    I've had worse coughs.

    The police won't contact your insurance, and to be honest, its unlikely they will follow up on the other car, if there is no damage then forget it, you will only be scammed for higher insurance payments for no reason if you report it

    Original Poster

    mikey_d

    The police won't contact your insurance, and to be honest, its unlikely … The police won't contact your insurance, and to be honest, its unlikely they will follow up on the other car, if there is no damage then forget it, you will only be scammed for higher insurance payments for no reason if you report it



    Fair enough. Now I've calmed down a bit this seems like one of the better outcomes and options.

    My car was damaged by another car whilst they was parking, a lovely scrape down the side of my car. The driver is paying for the damage to be repaired out of their own pocket.

    I rung my insurer to inform them of the incident. They didn't want any details but told me.

    I would be asked why I never claimed on the insurance if i didn't claim within 7 days.

    I had 3 years to make a claim on the damage caused.

    It would make no difference to my premiums if I did claim against their insurance as I was not at fault.

    This was a Tesco operative.

    Edited by: "antony4462" 18th Sep 2016

    antony4462

    My car was damaged by another car whilst they was parking, a lovely … My car was damaged by another car whilst they was parking, a lovely scrape down the side of my car. The driver is paying for the damage to be repaired out of their own pocket.I rung my insurer to inform them of the incident. They didn't want any details but told me.I would be asked why I never claimed on the insurance if i didn't claim within 7 days. I had 3 years to make a claim on the damage caused.It would make no difference to my premiums if I did claim as I was not at fault.This was a Tesco operative.




    You need to declare this now when renewing insurance or changing provider for next 5 years , it will have been logged, and yes it does increase premiums


    Edited by: "deanos" 18th Sep 2016

    I never gave any details not my policy number, name or address. they would have logged a call from number which was not my own. but I logged the time and date of the recorded conversation.

    The problem has been well explained . It is best to inform your insurer (to be on the safe side ) . However the problem comes when you insure net year . How many of us are foolish enough to reinsure with the same insurer these days ? Then when you visit a "compare site" you have to answer questions many of which will deny you quotes lust for revealing a "no fault accident". Not an easy question
    Edited by: "rogparki" 18th Sep 2016

    antony4462

    I never gave any details not my policy number, name or address. they … I never gave any details not my policy number, name or address. they would have logged a call from number which was not my own. but I logged the time and date of the recorded conversation.



    coolio

    Original Poster

    rogparki

    The problem has been well explained . It is best to inform your insurer … The problem has been well explained . It is best to inform your insurer (to be on the safe side ) . However the problem comes when you insure net year . How many of us are foolish enough to reinsure with the same insurer these days ? Then when you visit a "compare site" you have to answer questions many of which will deny you quotes lust for revealing a "no fault accident". Not an easy question



    I actually had to stay with the same insurer, they were the cheapest by several hundred £s across three major comparison sites, and direct insurers were almost double.

    I'm erring more towards not telling them. I've probably walked into doors harder than that car hit my rear bumper and I could do without the financial hassle.

    dkl_uk

    Fair enough. Now I've calmed down a bit this seems like one of the better … Fair enough. Now I've calmed down a bit this seems like one of the better outcomes and options.


    You seem to have made up your mind what to do.
    There are 2 risks here.
    RISK 1 If you report the accident truthfully with all the evidence you have there is a risk you may have to pay more insurance premiums - even though you are not claiming and have no damage. Of course you can always shop around and of course you should be bale to argue that such an incident hardly increases the insurance companies risk against you.

    RISK 2 There is a risk this incident could be revealed at a later date. You may perceive that the likelihood of this is low. But what you have to ask yourself is that should it be revealed what damage would that do?

    You have done the right honest thing by informing the police so why not extend it that little bit further - you know it makes sense.

    Banned

    1) you have told police and 2) you have it on dash cam so I presume the driver who swopped was also recorded doing that. if car is 100% fine then you don't need to tell insurance because there's nothing for you to claim . sure they don't have any insurance anyway

    Original Poster

    ceres

    Insurance policies are a special type of contract governed by the legal … Insurance policies are a special type of contract governed by the legal principle of uberimae fideii or utmost good faith. It obliges the disclosure of any information which might influence the insurer's assessment of risk.The greatest risk to you in not disclosing is that, in the event that you make a claim or someone claims against you, your insurance company discovers your failure to disclose and voids your policy because you have broken your contract with them.



    Thank-you for your detailed response.

    I would assume, in good faith, that a vehicle reversing into mine at ~2-3mph, causing no damage, doesn't impact upon a risk assessment of myself as an insured driver. Ultimately, I have called the police due to the change from a non-reportable offence to a reportable one when a person who was originally in the passenger seat got into the driver's seat and left the scene.

    If I were to receive a phone call from my insurer asking why I didn't report the accident, I would feel genuinely complacent in advising them that there is no damage, no risk, and that the other party was reported to the police for making off - and that's where I considered I had done all that was required of me.

    If it was 60 seconds later, I'd have been out of my car and inside of an Indian takeaway. I'd have absolutely no idea it even happened and due to the lack of damage, I'd be none the wiser as well.

    Original Poster

    ceres

    That isn't your call. The insurer decides what is material, not you. I … That isn't your call. The insurer decides what is material, not you. I think you misunderstand the meaning of uberimae fideii and the obligation it places on you. It has nothing to do with any assumption you might make 'in good faith'.



    So I can understand what motive you have in answering these questions, can you tell me whether you work for an insurance company or if you're just knowledgeable regarding insurance law?

    They want us to be honest but then penalise us, its a sad farce when honest people are driven to this type of choice. OP would like to notify their insurance but this is what its come down to. OP is involved in a accident through zero fault of their own, yet if they notify insurance company, they will likely penalise him.

    dkl_uk

    So I can understand what motive you have in answering these questions, … So I can understand what motive you have in answering these questions, can you tell me whether you work for an insurance company or if you're just knowledgeable regarding insurance law?


    shes a no win no fee solicitor X)

    only joking Ceres, though kudos for the knowledge you bring forth!!

    Original Poster

    Well, the police called me at 8am this morning and due to the fact there's no damage they will not pursue the other party. Separate to the fact the accident happened, I still have to wonder why the passenger and driver swapped over when he took off like a rocket, but, as with most things that involve crime today I cannot apply any logic to their thinking.

    Since the police don't care, I'll be leaving this particular incident under a rock where it belongs.
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