Do schools make money from trips?

37
Found 29th Jan 2014
Just curious as it costs £1,499 for my sister to go Disneyland Florida for 7 days with shared accommodation of 3 people. Think it might be cheaper elsewhere.

The deposit is also non-refundable £150.
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Just out of interest is that food, trips, sundries included or extra?
I don't think so, but you do subsidise the teacher going for free so this will factor into it.
some schools have a policy: any "profit" is reinvested in other trips

don't forget the price includes tickets for staff as well - in effect you are paying for responsible adults to look after the children during the trip!
archer1204

Just out of interest is that food, trips, sundries included or extra?



It's food included. It says breakfast and evening meal.

agneepath

some schools have a policy: any "profit" is reinvested in other trips



I don't really think there should be any profit in the first place. Don't educational institutes get like half price on everything? There's kids who can't afford to go but pressure their parents because their "friends are going".
Having costed and booked many school trips, I can safely say that schools don't make any profit. However, all teachers places are usually paid for in the price you are paying, or they are very highly subsidised. Remember, you aren't just paying for the trip - you're also paying for the teachers to be responsible for, and supervise your children 24/7 for the whole visit.
archer1204

Just out of interest is that food, trips, sundries included or extra?

agneepath

some schools have a policy: any "profit" is reinvested in other trips


Whatabout all the entrance fees to disneyworld etc they arent cheap
archer1204

Just out of interest is that food, trips, sundries included or extra?

agneepath

some schools have a policy: any "profit" is reinvested in other trips



Educational institutions don't get half price on everything. Also, there are usually grants that students from underprivileged backgrounds can apply for, so that they don't miss out. However, these types of trip are very popular and there are never enough places for everyone who wants to go.
Mermoo

Having costed and booked many school trips, I can safely say that schools … Having costed and booked many school trips, I can safely say that schools don't make any profit. However, all teachers places are usually paid for in the price you are paying, or they are very highly subsidised. Remember, you aren't just paying for the trip - you're also paying for the teachers to be responsible for, and supervise your children 24/7 for the whole visit.



By paid for is that wages, travel costs, hotel costs and food costs added into the price?
KM4353

By paid for is that wages, travel costs, hotel costs and food costs added … By paid for is that wages, travel costs, hotel costs and food costs added into the price?



Not wages - just the total trip cost
Also insurance too! Any park tickets ??
KM4353

By paid for is that wages, travel costs, hotel costs and food costs added … By paid for is that wages, travel costs, hotel costs and food costs added into the price?



Do you know what their itinerary is?
All the trips I have organised include paying for staff and possibly subsidising people who may not be able to afford it.

No 'profit', nor any real discounts. Organising through a specialist company is hella expensive, organising it yourself is pretty hard work (I've always done the latter)
In theory schools are not allowed to make a profit on school trips (state schools anyway). A profit and loss account should be completed showing this. The shortfall is often covered by donations from the PTA or school fund. As said earlier if any profit is made, and it is unlikely to be a lot, this will be used against future trips. A lot of school trips will also allow for teachers to go free as part of the package booked. I know a lot of people complain about teachers having the trip paid for but, to be honest, you couldn't pay me enough money to spend a day with 200 hormonal teenagers at Thorpe Park!!!
School trip .... Disneyland Florida .... Educational benefit? I suppose there's merit in rodent research!!!
If you think you can do it cheaper yourself then go for it.

I question the educational value of this trip too.
No. School's aren't allowed to make a profit.

Most schools use educational trip companies who organise the itinerary, coaches, flights, hotels etc. these companies often have deals with suppliers of flights etc so get a better deal.

They usually include "free" teacher places at a ratio of 1:8/1:15/1:20 or similar. Obviously they're not really free but are included in the per student price. Schools don't really get to negotiate - if the company says 2 free teachers, schools would be laughed at if they asked: "what if we have only one, is it cheaper?". In any case, an overseas residential trip with say 50 students will mean what £50 per student? - not much when you're paying £1500 for an optional trip. It's often a required that at least 2 adult accompany students - in case there is an accident and a student is injured, it means one can go to the hospital and the other can supervise the rest. Trips are great and a lot of fun, but they're bloody stressful - consider how stressed parents get taking their kids on a flight or walking through busy cities abroad, now imagine doing that for 50+ kids. Trips are rarely a "jolly".

If food isn't included, it usually is, teachers can claim a food allowance, but it's rarely worth the effort as it involves keeping and submitting reciepts, evidence it was necessary and in some cases, that it represented best value. And as it's added to your pay, tax is deducted, so most don't bother.

There's also insurance, which for residential, overnight and high-risk activities it can get expensive. More if you want to include baggage etc. Even a walking trip down to the local park cost my department 50p per student in insurance.

£1500 for 7 days might seem like a lot, but if you look at everything it includes, it probably is about what you'd pay, if not less, if you did it independently. Food, insurance, coaches taking you everywhere, attraction entries all add up. A £600 flight/hotel deal on Expedia does make it look expensive until you add in those costs.

Schools don't actually have to offer subsidised trips of this sort, unless it is during school hours and is directly linked/essential to the curriculum. They're usually oversubscribed anyway.

I've organised a few of the essential/curriculum/school hours type trips and I've usually only charged students for ticket prices for the events and paid the cost of the minibus/train from the department budget (or in the case of a competition this weekend, from my own pocket). For these kinds of trips, we aren't allowed to select students based on ability to pay, so we usually offer them entirely on a first-come basis, run competitions or pick names from a hat.
darrengrover

No. School's aren't allowed to make a profit. Most schools use … No. School's aren't allowed to make a profit. Most schools use educational trip companies who organise the itinerary, coaches, flights, hotels etc. these companies often have deals with suppliers of flights etc so get a better deal. They usually include "free" teacher places at a ratio of 1:8/1:15/1:20 or similar. Obviously they're not really free but are included in the per student price. Schools don't really get to negotiate - if the company says 2 free teachers, schools would be laughed at if they asked: "what if we have only one, is it cheaper?". In any case, an overseas residential trip with say 50 students will mean what £50 per student? - not much when you're paying £1500 for an optional trip. It's often a required that at least 2 adult accompany students - in case there is an accident and a student is injured, it means one can go to the hospital and the other can supervise the rest. Trips are great and a lot of fun, but they're bloody stressful - consider how stressed parents get taking their kids on a flight or walking through busy cities abroad, now imagine doing that for 50+ kids. Trips are rarely a "jolly".If food isn't included, it usually is, teachers can claim a food allowance, but it's rarely worth the effort as it involves keeping and submitting reciepts, evidence it was necessary and in some cases, that it represented best value. And as it's added to your pay, tax is deducted, so most don't bother.There's also insurance, which for residential, overnight and high-risk activities it can get expensive. More if you want to include baggage etc. Even a walking trip down to the local park cost my department 50p per student in insurance.£1500 for 7 days might seem like a lot, but if you look at everything it includes, it probably is about what you'd pay, if not less, if you did it independently. Food, insurance, coaches taking you everywhere, attraction entries all add up. A £600 flight/hotel deal on Expedia does make it look expensive until you add in those costs. Schools don't actually have to offer subsidised trips of this sort, unless it is during school hours and is directly linked/essential to the curriculum. They're usually oversubscribed anyway.I've organised a few of the essential/curriculum/school hours type trips and I've usually only charged students for ticket prices for the events and paid the cost of the minibus/train from the department budget (or in the case of a competition this weekend, from my own pocket). For these kinds of trips, we aren't allowed to select students based on ability to pay, so we usually offer them entirely on a first-come basis, run competitions or pick names from a hat.


Good informative answer. Thanks darren.
A school trip to Disneyland...
I was taken to the National Coal Mining Museum !
I was taken to Camelot theme park, when it was closed for the winter.......

whoever thought that business admin kids would enjoy seeing how the office works and walking around a closed theme park wants shooting
Edited by: "StevenBrown" 30th Jan 2014
My daughters school are offering an 'educational'trip to Iceland for 3 days costing £650 !! That's before you consider spending money, think I may show whoever organises these hols sunshine staceys thread lol
why is a school organising a trip to disneyland?

that seems ridiculous (and ridiculously expensive) - is it in term time?

http://www.jillgeorgegallery.co.uk/artists/mach/pics/mach_hell_disneyland.jpg
Edited by: "seb" 30th Jan 2014
MBeeching

A school trip to Disneyland...I was taken to the National Coal Mining … A school trip to Disneyland...I was taken to the National Coal Mining Museum !



pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was shoved up chimney for 8 hours then back home for a good beating.
My kid can go to austria for 6 days, £900.

I did hear that some teachers have to go before the actual trip to do a risk assessment which is included in the price. You know to check the beds are soft and which way the doors open.
splatsplatsplat

pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was … pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was shoved up chimney for 8 hours then back home for a good beating.



I thought squeezing through a chimney at the Museum of Childhood was brilliant
If you are that concerned, ask for a complete financial statement of the trip, if you get no where do it as a FOI request.
splatsplatsplat

My kid can go to austria for 6 days, £900.I did hear that some teachers … My kid can go to austria for 6 days, £900.I did hear that some teachers have to go before the actual trip to do a risk assessment which is included in the price. You know to check the beds are soft and which way the doors open.



And I'm sure if they didn't do this and something happened you would be asking why they didn't do one?

Does she want to go? If yes, just pay it.
My older 2 are going away with school to France this year, she was £200 down from £270 for 5days they going and 1 day they go into Disney aswell as Eiffel Tower etc on other days, infact she leaves early hours of Monday morning next week.
My eldest is going for 5 or 7 days can't remember ( not had a meeting etc about just it yet and I paid almost a year ago so can't remember full details ) and it was £495.
Better not be in term time - councils can now take parents to court if they take their child away on holiday during term time....

only 8 hours...part-timer

splatsplatsplat

pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was … pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was shoved up chimney for 8 hours then back home for a good beating.

Daaaavvveee

And I'm sure if they didn't do this and something happened you would be … And I'm sure if they didn't do this and something happened you would be asking why they didn't do one?



That's right, cause if my son slept on a hard bed or got stuck in a doorway - I'll be first in line for a public inquiry!
splatsplatsplat

pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was … pfft, I would LOVE to have gone to a Mining museum, all we got t'was shoved up chimney for 8 hours then back home for a good beating.



That made me giggle...thanks.

We shouldn't really complain, as School trips are good for the children. I wouldn't want mine to miss out, although they might have to with this one, as its not just a weeks wage. oO
deleted57959

Why not if I remember my trips the teachers went to the bar while us kids … Why not if I remember my trips the teachers went to the bar while us kids ran around for 5 hours and everyone met at the coach at the end of the day



Sounds like a good School trip if you are a child. lol
My gf is a teacher. She explained to me about the trips she organises.

Usually, her admins look at prices and make a suggestion of appropriate bookings, they will consider various factors such as ratings, safety, distance from scheduled activities, other transport needs amongst others such as ease of access for disabled guests and facilities the hotel/resort offer..

When it comes to pricing the students will pay slightly more than the single booking to cover the costs of accommodation for the teachers whom will be accompanying the children on the visit. They may also have factored in a minor emergency cost.

The chances are that you will find a cheaper price, however consider that more than just cost is considered before a trip is booked.

Generally any surplus cash of which there would only be small amounts would usually go towards other trips- this would offset any teacher costs first thus reducing student/parent expenditure.

The school doesn't profit in anyway, and the money goes on the books for the relative department.

Unless, the course specifically dictates on signup that trips are pre requisite, eg spanish may require the student to do a 2 week exchange - they are optional.

If this is of concern you could always speak to the school/trip organisers, and perhaps put forward suggestions for future visits, although i dare say, its probably too late this one!

Hope that helps.
At the school I work at, the cost of the trip is inflated to cover paying for a couple of kids who they know won't pay the full amount but they have to let on the trip.
splatsplatsplat

That's right, cause if my son slept on a hard bed or got stuck in a … That's right, cause if my son slept on a hard bed or got stuck in a doorway - I'll be first in line for a public inquiry!



I think we both know i meant if anything serious happened. All people do is complain, if i had kids and the chance to let them go see different places and experience the cultures i would. Whether or not i could save X% wouldn't bother me.
MBeeching

A school trip to Disneyland...I was taken to the National Coal Mining … A school trip to Disneyland...I was taken to the National Coal Mining Museum !



Round my neck of the woods is that, and I still haven't visited it. Not even on a school trip
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