Does medication for motion sickness actually works?

38
Found 24th Feb
Anyone suffer from motion sickness and have experience of whether medication actually works?

I have to go on the ferry to Spain in April and I get very bad sea sick on the ferry as it is a 24 hour journey. My in-laws have advised me to get medication but I am concerned that it will make things worse rather than better as I don't tend to react well to medication and suffer from their side effects.

Therefore there is no point in me taking medication if it doesn't even work or has limited effects.

Anyone got experience of whether these medication actually work or not and can advise me or recommend the medication I should buy?
Community Updates
Ask
38 Comments
I suffer from seasickness and used to spend a week at a time 24/7 on a boat with rough seas at times. What really worked for me was stugeron.

I also tried Avomine but it makes you very drowsy.
Edited by: "ScubaDudes" 24th Feb
My kids both used to get travel sick when they were younger, both boats and coaches , the travel sickness pills they used always worked , even now my daughter will take her travel wristbands with her on occasion. Might just be the placebo effect with them but she says they work for her .
Travel sicknesses pills worked for one of my kids but I'm still of the opinion it's a placebo effect.
tinkerbellian14 m ago

My kids both used to get travel sick when they were younger, both boats …My kids both used to get travel sick when they were younger, both boats and coaches , the travel sickness pills they used always worked , even now my daughter will take her travel wristbands with her on occasion. Might just be the placebo effect with them but she says they work for her .



I have read that it is certainly a matter of mind. That if you thought you were going to be ill, you will get ill so you should tell yourself that you are fine and that is supposed to help!

I don't suffer from motion sickness from any form of transport except for boats and I am fine for short trips but as this is a long trip I found that the last time I was on the ferry, I felt really bad with a headache and dizziness throughout the journey. I spent most of it lying down on the bed with my eyes closed but that did not stop the headache and dizziness.
Oranges work well. They look and taste the same going down and coming up

Ask you GP practise nurse (who will have access to your medical record and be aware of your sensitivities)
Or ask a phamacist

be aware that anything strong may affect your driving license eligibility & therefore insurance if driving
dont buy quack medication which have no single active ingredient

there are medications that contain hyoscine, promethazine or cinnarizine which helps with motion sickness.

no matter how much you tell yourself you are fine your inner ear will make you feel sick
Edited by: "mattsk" 24th Feb
Yes they definitely work, I always use them when going to theme parks and they always work a treat, usually use the ones from boots
Best thing to do is to stay on an open deck as much as possible. Motion sickness is mainly caused by disassociation of your balance and what you can see. If you can see the horizon, your vision and balance are connected and the nausea is lessened.
niconelove50 m ago

Yes they definitely work, I always use them when going to theme parks and …Yes they definitely work, I always use them when going to theme parks and they always work a treat, usually use the ones from boots


Do they give you any side effects? Any particular ones from boots? I stopped going on the theme park rides when I was a kid as I felt ill afterwards. I still loved the theme parks, but I just went on the train rides around the theme parks and avoid the big rides.
mutley123 m ago

Do they give you any side effects? Any particular ones from boots? I …Do they give you any side effects? Any particular ones from boots? I stopped going on the theme park rides when I was a kid as I felt ill afterwards. I still loved the theme parks, but I just went on the train rides around the theme parks and avoid the big rides.


Stugeron contains cinnarizine
Avomine contains promethazine


33321980-K8OFl.jpg
Edited by: "ScubaDudes" 24th Feb
Nope, not for me anyway. Only way i can deal with motion sickness is to go to sleep. I take a bunch of calms or as close to drowsy sleeping tablets as possible and go to sleep. If Im awake, im just ill and the planes are the worst. its like riding a rollercoaster for hours
ScubaDudes10 m ago

Stugeron contains cinnarizine


I googled stugeron when you mentioned it and it states cinnarizine. I am slightly concerned that one of the side effects is stomach upset as I tend to suffer from this when I take medication.
darthbacca3724th Feb

Nope, not for me anyway. Only way i can deal with motion sickness is to …Nope, not for me anyway. Only way i can deal with motion sickness is to go to sleep. I take a bunch of calms or as close to drowsy sleeping tablets as possible and go to sleep. If Im awake, im just ill and the planes are the worst. its like riding a rollercoaster for hours


I tend to be fine on planes, even long haul and through turbulence, but for some reason, I get affected on boats, even in calm waters. A colleague of mine takes valium for sea sickness, but I don't think that is a good idea!
mutley12 m ago

I tend to be fine on planes, even long haul and through turbulence, but …I tend to be fine on planes, even long haul and through turbulence, but for some reason, I get affected on boats, even in calm waters. A colleague of mine takes valium for sea sickness, but I don't think that is a good idea!


ah really? see on trains and boats im good, anything else im rubbish! even driving a car myself i get sick sometimes. Then I have to deal with it, it isnt great
Best one I (and kids, and grandkids) have found is Travella, by Nelson's. Not a believer in homeopathic meds etc, but for some reason these work really well. No longer available over the counter, but you can buy a big bottle of the tiny pills online. I got them from Turmeric & Honey for £16.95, you get lots for this (200). turmericandhoney.co.uk/dig…051
Obviously they won't work for everybody, but lots of people I know swear by them. For example, I was on a ferry from Aberdeen to Shetland, with my friends ill with sliding back and forward in the bunks, but I was fine. Also up the West Coast of Canada, my pal was poorly till I got her to take these.They'd have worked better if she'd taken them as recommended, (two under the tongue or sucked) a couple of hours in advance, then as needed, but they seemed to help a lot.
I suffered from travel sickness for years. Finally grew out of it at around 60! Always took Kwells. nothing else worked for me. And no, it is definitely not all in the mind.
My wife swears by Dramimine (adult and children variants)

Myself it has to be really rough to be effected but the pattern I follow is to ensure I have fully eaten before journey starts.

As mentioned above fresh air on deck with seeing the horizon is useful but that would be when already feeling ill.

The best I have ever found is with cabins, as mentioned above, to get your head down. In this position it rocks you like a baby sending you to sleep.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 24th Feb
mattsk1 h, 54 m ago

dont buy quack medication which have no single active ingredientthere are …dont buy quack medication which have no single active ingredientthere are medications that contain hyoscine, promethazine or cinnarizine which helps with motion sickness.no matter how much you tell yourself you are fine your inner ear will make you feel sick


every medication will have side effects. you need to check all of them and see which one fits best.
you have been given several suggestions, it would be a good idea to check them out
Bertz9924th Feb

My wife swears by Dramimine (adult and children variants)Myself it has to …My wife swears by Dramimine (adult and children variants)Myself it has to be really rough to be effected but the pattern I follow is to ensure I have fully eaten before journey starts.As mentioned above fresh air on deck with seeing the horizon is useful but that would be when already feeling ill.The best I have ever found is with cabins, as mentioned above, to get your head down. In this position it rocks you like a baby sending you to sleep.


i read that you should not eat if you suffer from sea sickness as you will increase the chance of vomiting, so i was planning not to eat anything. i did go on deck when i was on the ferry the last time i was there but it was freezing cold and raining so i did not stay on deck for long, but that would help if i could do this. i did find that being on deck certainly helped.

i lied down on the bed in the cabin because i felt so dizzy, but i think being inactive does not help to be honest, although reading google, it would suggest that lying down and closing your eyes is supposed to help.
mutley119 m ago

i read that you should not eat if you suffer from sea sickness as you will …i read that you should not eat if you suffer from sea sickness as you will increase the chance of vomiting, so i was planning not to eat anything. i did go on deck when i was on the ferry the last time i was there but it was freezing cold and raining so i did not stay on deck for long, but that would help if i could do this. i did find that being on deck certainly helped.i lied down on the bed in the cabin because i felt so dizzy, but i think being inactive does not help to be honest, although reading google, it would suggest that lying down and closing your eyes is supposed to help.


I can only suggest where you have been reading is wrong. Travelling on an empty stomach is proven to be one of the worse approaches.

Point 1 + 2 here, also some other points not above:
mentalfloss.com/art…ess
Edited by: "Bertz99" 24th Feb
I don't know why but this app isn't allowing me to quote the above post on the recommendation of homeopathic turmeric and honey for some reason.

Anyway, homoepathy is actually a pseudoscience.

Homeopathic remedies don't contain any ingredients: they are basically just water or sugar pills. Without any active ingredient, that ultimately amounts to a lot of money for not a lot of sugar.



Also, personal testimony does not count as good evidence. Science doesn't work like that. Although anecdotal evidence has its place in scientific theory: no theory should be solely dependent on anecdotal evidence.

One major problem with pseudoscience is that it places a strong and selective emphasis on anecdotes, and anecdotes alone, as support for its claims and theories.

John Jackson on his website critical-thinking.org.uk also tells us: Anyone who has been given a recommendation for a treatment should not be swayed by anecdotes alone, even though that person may genuinely be trying to help, and should check out the clinical evidence to support the proposed remedy.

Mutley, speak to your GP or a pharmacist. Tell them about your concerns. Your GP is most likely to know you better though, what you're sensitivities are, etc. They should also be able to reassure you of any side effects as well.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
Some cruise liners have green apples around the ship, in rooms, restaurants, bars etc. These are supposed to help. When our kids were young, they had travel bands. Also ginger is supposed to be very good.
cornishscouse15 m ago

Some cruise liners have green apples around the ship, in rooms, …Some cruise liners have green apples around the ship, in rooms, restaurants, bars etc. These are supposed to help. When our kids were young, they had travel bands. Also ginger is supposed to be very good.


Placebo. Your beliefs and expectations may invoke a "conditioned response". Maybe because you've been told why they are there, to stop motion sickness. Possibly and most likely.

And according to WebMD: Ginger may be eaten in raw or candied forms, taken as a powder in capsules, or consumed as a tea. Although many people report that ginger prevents or eases their nausea from motion sickness, evidence is conflicting.

webmd.com/bab…iew
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
mattsk1 h, 7 m ago

every medication will have side effects. you need to check all of them and …every medication will have side effects. you need to check all of them and see which one fits best.you have been given several suggestions, it would be a good idea to check them out


Not the best advice. And the same goes for Bertz99 though both are well intended.

Speak to your GP Muttley. Anything else, speak to a pharmacist as they may have more time for you unlike a GP who is pushed for time.
Bertz9924th Feb

I can only suggest where you have been reading is wrong. Travelling on an …I can only suggest where you have been reading is wrong. Travelling on an empty stomach is proven to be one of the worse approaches.Point 1 + 2 here, also some other points not above:http://mentalfloss.com/article/78131/9-scientifically-proven-ways-prevent-motion-sickness


What is metalfloss.com?
Avatar
deleted568030
If you're concerned about medication it may be worth trying travel bands, there are numerous ones on Amazon. I don't suffer myself but we were on ferries in the Canaries recently and the sea was very rough, lots of people were really ill. Two people in our group suffered from sea sickness, one who just used tablets was so ill he had to to be helped off the ferry in a wheelchair the other used travel bands and felt pretty ropey but wasn't ill.
Just the first article I saw that concurs with my understanding.

If you would like another you can see NHS which states not to have a full stomach with food that is greasy or strong flavours (currys might be a bad idea). That is not the same as an empty stomach though which they also advise trying ginger and eating biscuits.

An empty stomach isn't what I would recommend. Good plain meal 40 mins before setting off has always done me well compared to when I haven't- except the time I was in a 30 ft vessel in a force 6 that jumped to 8 and needing to suck diesel through the injectors. Felt very poorly then.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 24th Feb
LemonHead34 m ago

Not the best advice. And the same goes for Bertz99 though both are well …Not the best advice. And the same goes for Bertz99 though both are well intended.Speak to your GP Muttley. Anything else, speak to a pharmacist as they may have more time for you unlike a GP who is pushed for time.


you cannot be serious?
OTC medications are safe to use with minimal side effects (provided you read dosage and use). its like trying paracetamol or ibuprofen if one doesnt work or has negative effects you cannot tolerate, you got to the next one or cetirizine vs loratadine or ferrous fumarate vs ferrous sulfate....
i could list them endlesly
mattsk54 m ago

you cannot be serious?OTC medications are safe to use with minimal side …you cannot be serious?OTC medications are safe to use with minimal side effects (provided you read dosage and use). its like trying paracetamol or ibuprofen if one doesnt work or has negative effects you cannot tolerate, you got to the next one or cetirizine vs loratadine or ferrous fumarate vs ferrous sulfate....i could list them endlesly


I don't actually disagree with you, it was because you said you need to check all of them and see which one fits best and have been given several suggestions and it would be a good idea to check them out though I may have misunderstood what you were saying. What I was thinking however is to speak to somebody who knows more about the OP's concerns, GP or pharmacist, and not rely on what people are posting on here despite this rather than trying everyone. My mistake. And I wasn't saying that OTC medications aren't safe either by the way. Sorry for misunderstanding what was written. Though I will continue to say, no one should rely on any information given here without checking it themselves first. Sometimes messages are posted that are poorly researched, ill-conceived, or downright wrong. Sadly, they can even be misleading and deceptive even though well meant.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
I'm going to be a little pedantic here though. Are all OTC drugs actually safe though? They are safe and effective when you follow the directions on the label and as directed by your health care professional. As I say, pedantic.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
LemonHead2 h, 5 m ago

I'm going to be a little pedantic here though. Are all OTC drugs actually …I'm going to be a little pedantic here though. Are all OTC drugs actually safe though? They are safe and effective when you follow the directions on the label and as directed by your health care professional. As I say, pedantic.


if we are being pedantic.... water is not safe either, drink 10litres in short period of time and suffer the consequences
dose makes the poison
LemonHead3 h, 52 m ago

I'm going to be a little pedantic here though. Are all OTC drugs actually …I'm going to be a little pedantic here though. Are all OTC drugs actually safe though? They are safe and effective when you follow the directions on the label and as directed by your health care professional. As I say, pedantic.



Being superfluous I would say wasting a GP's time for something rated below minor ailment is ludicrous as you have advised, regardless of best intentions.

Especially when you put into context that the NHS has put many initiatives in place for minor illnesses to be sought in the cheaper more cost effective manner via pharmacists (e.g Minor Ailment scheme) due to the cost analysis and primary cares stretched resources.

Fortunately, I don't think you need to worry in respect to mutley, from what I have seen she likes to ask and then is more than capable in being able to determine for herself.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 24th Feb
Bertz9924th Feb

Just the first article I saw that concurs with my understanding.If you …Just the first article I saw that concurs with my understanding.If you would like another you can see NHS which states not to have a full stomach with food that is greasy or strong flavours (currys might be a bad idea). That is not the same as an empty stomach though which they also advise trying ginger and eating biscuits.An empty stomach isn't what I would recommend. Good plain meal 40 mins before setting off has always done me well compared to when I haven't- except the time I was in a 30 ft vessel in a force 6 that jumped to 8 and needing to suck diesel through the injectors. Felt very poorly then.


Yeah. I read that you shouldnt eat heavy meals on the nhs site, so i guessed it would be even better if i ate nothing at all, as then there is nothing to bring back up

the article did not say you should eat something, it assumes most people will eat as they would be hungry sooner or later
LemonHead7 h, 18 m ago

I don't know why but this app isn't allowing me to quote the above post on …I don't know why but this app isn't allowing me to quote the above post on the recommendation of homeopathic turmeric and honey for some reason.Anyway, homoepathy is actually a pseudoscience.Homeopathic remedies don't contain any ingredients: they are basically just water or sugar pills. Without any active ingredient, that ultimately amounts to a lot of money for not a lot of sugar.[Video] Also, personal testimony does not count as good evidence. Science doesn't work like that. Although anecdotal evidence has its place in scientific theory: no theory should be solely dependent on anecdotal evidence.One major problem with pseudoscience is that it places a strong and selective emphasis on anecdotes, and anecdotes alone, as support for its claims and theories.John Jackson on his website critical-thinking.org.uk also tells us: Anyone who has been given a recommendation for a treatment should not be swayed by anecdotes alone, even though that person may genuinely be trying to help, and should check out the clinical evidence to support the proposed remedy.Mutley, speak to your GP or a pharmacist. Tell them about your concerns. Your GP is most likely to know you better though, what you're sensitivities are, etc. They should also be able to reassure you of any side effects as well.


My gp doesnt know much about me as i have rarely been to the doctor so there is very little medical history in my file. My body has a tendency to over react to anything foreign as it thinks i am being attacked and goes all out on a war path. I guess i have an overactive immune system.

medication is often considered foreign so my body thinks there is danger and goes all berserk. I may try the medicine before i go as then i would feel ill at home rather than on the ferry, if i do adversely react to the medication
mattsk3 h, 31 m ago

if we are being pedantic.... water is not safe either, drink 10litres in …if we are being pedantic.... water is not safe either, drink 10litres in short period of time and suffer the consequencesdose makes the poison


Point taken. I was kind of thinking of that to be honest. I was also being a little belligerent as well. Kind of the mood I was in.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
Bertz9924th Feb

Being superfluous I would say wasting a GP's time for something rated …Being superfluous I would say wasting a GP's time for something rated below minor ailment is ludicrous as you have advised, regardless of best intentions.Especially when you put into context that the NHS has put many initiatives in place for minor illnesses to be sought in the cheaper more cost effective manner via pharmacists (e.g Minor Ailment scheme) due to the cost analysis and primary cares stretched resources.Fortunately, I don't think you need to worry in respect to mutley, from what I have seen she likes to ask and then is more than capable in being able to determine for herself.


Good point. I admit I wasn't thinking of your general point.
mutley118 m ago

My gp doesnt know much about me as i have rarely been to the doctor so …My gp doesnt know much about me as i have rarely been to the doctor so there is very little medical history in my file. My body has a tendency to over react to anything foreign as it thinks i am being attacked and goes all out on a war path. I guess i have an overactive immune system.medication is often considered foreign so my body thinks there is danger and goes all berserk. I may try the medicine before i go as then i would feel ill at home rather than on the ferry, if i do adversely react to the medication


The things we do, all in the name of science.

Good luck.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 24th Feb
mutley110 h, 39 m ago

Do they give you any side effects? Any particular ones from boots? I …Do they give you any side effects? Any particular ones from boots? I stopped going on the theme park rides when I was a kid as I felt ill afterwards. I still loved the theme parks, but I just went on the train rides around the theme parks and avoid the big rides.


I've never had any side effects and the ones in the picture above
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants