Posted 11th Jan 2022 (Posted 14 h, 8 m ago)
We decided to cut a door from our hallway to the garage. My builder saying normal internal door will be fine, but his carpenter said to me it is best to install a upvc door, which is secure and tight fit, that will stop all the cold coming inside to the house. Please anyone advise me. Thanks in advance
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And I would say that neither is correct. Building Control are likely to want a 30 minute FIRE door with intumescent strip. That's not that much more expensive than an ordinary door but it is heavier, requires 3 hinges and self closing mechanism.

Check with building control.

Not using the correct door would also invalidate any insurance claim resulting from an incident that spreads from garage to house. Could be fire. could be smoke. could be fuel spill

A surveyor would spot it even on a valuation report
18 Comments
  1. Avatar
    I would side with the carpenter. Unless your garage is insulated I imagine its quite cold this time of the year and all the cold will be coming straight into the house. Yes it is more expensive but for security and keeping the house warm it is well worth it.
  2. Avatar
    Author
    JJ90011/01/2022 18:51

    I would side with the carpenter. Unless your garage is insulated I imagine …I would side with the carpenter. Unless your garage is insulated I imagine its quite cold this time of the year and all the cold will be coming straight into the house. Yes it is more expensive but for security and keeping the house warm it is well worth it.


    The garage is not insulated. Thanks
  3. Avatar
    And I would say that neither is correct. Building Control are likely to want a 30 minute FIRE door with intumescent strip. That's not that much more expensive than an ordinary door but it is heavier, requires 3 hinges and self closing mechanism.

    Check with building control.

    Not using the correct door would also invalidate any insurance claim resulting from an incident that spreads from garage to house. Could be fire. could be smoke. could be fuel spill

    A surveyor would spot it even on a valuation report
  4. Avatar
    I would suggest a door that is fire rated.

    You might want to check with your home insurance company as to the standard of door you fit. They may well demand a certain specification of build and security.
  5. Avatar
    Check building regulations, but I believe it has to be a fire door, it will also need to be secure and draft proof because a garage door wont be, so an internal door would be unsuitable.
    Edited by: "melted" 13 h, 40 m ago
  6. Avatar
    Don't forget to get a surveyor to advise if a lintel is needed above the new door, it is likely to be a structural wall.
  7. Avatar
    Integral Garages and Fire Safety
    Internal doors to integral garages should be FD30 fire doors, and include smoke seals and self-closing devices. (These are the only doors inside a dwelling that require self-closing doors.)
  8. Avatar
    Agreed with the fire door suggestions.
    That was the advice we had when we did similar. I definitely wouldn't be using a regular internal door though due to any potential heat loss.
  9. Avatar
    We did something similar and had to have a 30min fire door fitted. There are also building regs concerning the thru flooring. It has to be able to prevent a flammable fluid from entering the main dwelling. So a step down into the garage is fine, but a level floor or step up into, is not. In last house had to build a single run of low blocks across the bottom door frame to get council to sign it off.
    Edited by: "airbus330" 12 h, 53 m ago
  10. Avatar
    Sounds like you know a few cowboys! Defo don't install anything other than a fire door. Ignoring the obvious reason for fitting a fire door it has the advantages of sound insulation as well. Insurance won't pay out either in the event of a fire, if the door is not fire rated, they also won't pay out in the event of a burglary.
    As others have mentioned there is also the case of structural work - will the door need a lintel?

    My parents house got broken into by the rear uPVC door - the thieves kicked the bottom door panel in! Insurance did pay out and the whole back of the house got fitted with Rhino uPVC doors & windows!
  11. Avatar
    harrythefish11/01/2022 19:29

    Don't forget to get a surveyor to advise if a lintel is needed above the …Don't forget to get a surveyor to advise if a lintel is needed above the new door, it is likely to be a structural wall.


    ^ This is very important so make sure you check, regardless I’d be getting a lintel of a suitable size and spec installed.
  12. Avatar
    simon580011/01/2022 19:36

    Integral Garages and Fire SafetyInternal doors to integral garages should …Integral Garages and Fire SafetyInternal doors to integral garages should be FD30 fire doors, and include smoke seals and self-closing devices. (These are the only doors inside a dwelling that require self-closing doors.)


    What if you're only ever going to have an electric car in there? (Actually no one I know of has used their garage to park a car in). I'll fess up though. Due to the low miles I was driving I used to park the car in the garage. Which is probably why I had a burglary attempt - burglar must've been convinced the house was unoccupied.
  13. Avatar
    We've the same set up, the door to the garage use to be the front door (as we moved the front door) & have what is now the garage internal door replaced with a 30 minute fire-door fitted with a self closer. We weren't allowed legally to fit any other type of door.
  14. Avatar
    Author
    Thank you all for your replies and I would go for a 30 min fire door and will install lintels.
  15. Avatar
    harrythefish11/01/2022 20:12

    What if you're only ever going to have an electric car in there? (Actually …What if you're only ever going to have an electric car in there? (Actually no one I know of has used their garage to park a car in). I'll fess up though. Due to the low miles I was driving I used to park the car in the garage. Which is probably why I had a burglary attempt - burglar must've been convinced the house was unoccupied.


    I had a discussion with a fire protection company a few months ago, I came away with the impression that the risk is equal, if not greater with an electric vehicle.
  16. Avatar
    cannotthinkofone11/01/2022 21:30

    I had a discussion with a fire protection company a few months ago, I …I had a discussion with a fire protection company a few months ago, I came away with the impression that the risk is equal, if not greater with an electric vehicle.


    I was going to say that I would think an electric car with a large lithium battery is likely to be a bigger fire risk than a petrol engine car. Unless the owner still has a hoard of petrol stored in plastic carrier bags from the petrol crisis.
    Edited by: "melted" 10 h, 10 m ago
  17. Avatar
    harrythefish11/01/2022 20:12

    What if you're only ever going to have an electric car in there? (Actually …What if you're only ever going to have an electric car in there? (Actually no one I know of has used their garage to park a car in). I'll fess up though. Due to the low miles I was driving I used to park the car in the garage. Which is probably why I had a burglary attempt - burglar must've been convinced the house was unoccupied.


    Its not really about having a car in the garage. The assumption is that a garage will contain more flammable products in storage than the other rooms in the house.
    I should have added in my last post that if you have any internal soil pipes passing through the ceiling into rooms above the garage they need to have smoke traps fitted.
  18. Avatar
    Author
    Received email from building control and they are saying I need to apply for building control application, as it is classified aa a controlled work.
    Edited by: "spa" 30 s ago
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