Drying out a conservatory

17
Found 13th Feb
I had a conservatory built before xmas and completed late January due to the bad weather...anyone got advise to keep drying it out...there is a lot of condensation every time I come home...I'm using a dehumidifier
any advice will be appreciated

2893535-s5rBw.jpg
Community Updates
Ask
17 Comments
You need ventilation to combat condensation.
What dehumidifier do you have and is there a radiator in the conservatory?
Is the plaster still drying out, that might be causing more condensation than what is usual, i used a window vac when i had my roof changed and plastered,
You could put all those fanlights on the first little opening to get fresh air in.
chocci54 m ago

What dehumidifier do you have and is there a radiator in the conservatory?


I second the radiator. Can only think that’s the difference between our conservatories, they’re pretty similar
Whoever built it for you needs to advise you. Did the builder involve those pesky Building Regs inspectors? (s)he should have. If there is no ventilation, it sounds as though it may not have been built properly.

If it s a screed floor, the rule of thumb is to allow 1 day per millimetre thickness for drying and that would be for good weather, not mid winter. Then lay the tiles or flooring. Hopefully, the flooring isn't down already.
Edited by: "ccnp" 13th Feb
Original Poster
Thanks for the replies...some people have say open the Windows but I was thinking it might be counter productive as the weather is so bad lately n cold that the moisture will go back in

I've got Ecoair DD128 dehumidifier in there at the moment

I opted for no radiator in the conservatory but I also have access to a heater

@ccnp i haven't laid the floor...I've left it to dry from mid January now...nearly 3 weeks to allow for the screed floor to dry as well as the plastering...I've left it as a empty room at the moment

One of the problems is it's not a southerly facing garden so at the best of times it's not getting as much sun
That's good. It will dry out with the window ajar as the relative moisture content of the air is lower than the screed/plaster. That will change over time.

Using a dehumidifier works (I used one) but be gentle now to avoid problems later. Strongly suggest you don't add the heater. Screed that is dried too quickly cracks and then you have the sound of grit underfoot. You can bodge a repair if that happens using a latex screed but you will always regret it.

Grim tough it sounds, you should plan on a minimum of 2 months and more likely three before covering the floor. Screed is normally a minimum of 2" think.

It looks like it will take forever looking forward but is nothing looking back and by spring you will be installed in there.
ccnp2 h, 20 m ago

Whoever built it for you needs to advise you. Did the builder involve …Whoever built it for you needs to advise you. Did the builder involve those pesky Building Regs inspectors? (s)he should have. If there is no ventilation, it sounds as though it may not have been built properly.If it s a screed floor, the rule of thumb is to allow 1 day per millimetre thickness for drying and that would be for good weather, not mid winter. Then lay the tiles or flooring. Hopefully, the flooring isn't down already.


conservatories generally do not fall within building regulations remit unless it is raised off ground level or in excess of 30m2

planningportal.co.uk/inf…s/3
I agree with leaving windows open a little ,
No radiator ? Conservatories are the biggest reason for central heating upgrades.
Edited by: "zzzz" 13th Feb
bruce2872 h, 4 m ago

Thanks for the replies...some people have say open the Windows but I was …Thanks for the replies...some people have say open the Windows but I was thinking it might be counter productive as the weather is so bad lately n cold that the moisture will go back in


As long as you're not actually getting water running or raining into the conservatory it'll be fine. At worst it's no wetter than the air inside, and when it's dryer outside it'll remove moisture much more quickly.
If you had it built Dec/Jan, its probably had a good soaking throughout its build. Mine was built in August Sun, and still had condensation for a few weeks. The concrete/plaster smell took another 5-6 months to go away.
bruce2872 h, 45 m ago

Thanks for the replies...some people have say open the Windows but I was …Thanks for the replies...some people have say open the Windows but I was thinking it might be counter productive as the weather is so bad lately n cold that the moisture will go back inI've got Ecoair DD128 dehumidifier in there at the moment I opted for no radiator in the conservatory but I also have access to a heater@ccnp i haven't laid the floor...I've left it to dry from mid January now...nearly 3 weeks to allow for the screed floor to dry as well as the plastering...I've left it as a empty room at the momentOne of the problems is it's not a southerly facing garden so at the best of times it's not getting as much sun


Open the doors twice a day to ventilate


Far less moisture in the outside air (Google relative humidity)
Also if you are getting condensation on the windows use this as a free dehumidifier - get a Karcher window vac and collect and dispose of the condensation every morning.

As long as no water is getting in to the conservatory it will dry eventually.
Two things. One you need heat in the room to make the air damp instead of the walls etc then you need a dehumidifier to extract it. There are two types of dehumidifier there is the compressor ones that can run in colder temps there desiccant ones and as far as I remember they need to be running at room temp to work. Either way the hotter the room the better both perform.

Ebay you can pick up a dirty old big dehumidifier run it for some time and then put it back on ebay,
Original Poster
Thanks again everyone

I'm using a dessicant dehumidifier through the night after using the karcher vac to suck clear up the condensation first

I then open the Windows during the day...sometimes I'll use the heater n then open the dehumidifier but never at the same time

The condensation is there most mornings or night dripping onto the window boards from the roof
Have you tried leaving the dehumidifier on all day and night without opening any windows etc.

The reason I ask is because I know it's not the same scenario but my house in general suffers from condensation and when I tried leaving the window open in the day in the Winter it was worse and it caused my mattress to get damp.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants